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Definition - palisading nuclei

Discussion in 'Step I' started by osli, 02.13.08.

  1. osli

    osli Senior Member

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    I've seen this pop up in a qbank question or two, and I'm struggling to get a good definition. I know what palisading means regarding fences or cliffs, but what exactly are they talking about when applied to a malignancy?
  2. DragonWell

    DragonWell Moderator Emeritus

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    Based on my path reading, my simple understanding is that palisading is where the nuclei line up, almost looking like a wall or fence, and pseudopalisading is where they are lined up with necrosis next to them like in a glioblastoma.

    Palisading:
    [​IMG]

    Pseudopalisading
    [​IMG]

    I'm sure you know all that already, but I've never come across a good explanation of why the cells do this in certain neoplasms. Do the questions you're looking at require a deeper understanding than this?
  3. Jonathan13180

    Jonathan13180 Senior Member

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    Palisading-Ependymoma The cells are called Antoni A/B cells, whereas the space between them i think is called a verocay body.

    Pseuodopalisading- Homer Wright Rossettes-Medulloblastoma. As is shown in the pictures above-with medulloblastoma, the cells are "palisading" around an empty space, whereas in ependymomas, they are around a blood vessel.

    Not sure if this helps? Why do the cells do this? I have no idea.
  4. osli

    osli Senior Member

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    Wow, a response with pictures! :thumbup:

    I guess I know what the tumors look like and can identify them from histological inspection, but I was afraid that the push away from "buzz words" might leave me with a question attempting to describe 'palisading' that didn't ring any bells with me. Kaplan has used 'palisading nuclei' in a couple of questions, but perhaps the USMLE won't. I guess I'm worried they wouldn't say "nuclei lined up like fence posts" but something retarded like "replication centers migrating under influence of transcription factor 2x&8p:3r#". :laugh:
  5. lankysudanese

    lankysudanese antibiotics fetish

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    palisading nuclei are also seen in basal cell carcinomas of the skin.
  6. osli

    osli Senior Member

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    That and glioblastomas are where I've seen them pop up most often in descriptions. :thumbup:

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