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Quick question about teaching

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by dcc777, 06.12.12.

  1. dcc777

    dcc777

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    In order to be a TA at your university (as a grad student), do you have to be licensed through the Department of Education?

    How about once you have your PhD and choose to teach - do you have to be licensed through them then?

    Thank you!
     
  2. cara susanna

    cara susanna Predoctoral Intern

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    Not that I'm aware of.
     
  3. bmedclinic

    bmedclinic

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    when I was a GA teaching a few classes on the side at my univ to bring in some cash, I only had to send my dept chair my vita. It's surprisingly easy and a tad scary at the same time, imo.
     
  4. Pragma

    Pragma

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    I am not aware of needing any formal license from the Department of Education. Generally once you have received at least a master's degree, you have met some basic requirement for teaching at the undergraduate level. PhD for doctorate level...etc.

    But I do know that some institutions require some form of reassurance about your teaching. Some places actually have training programs built in to teach you how to teach. If you are adjuncting, some places may want copies of your course evaluations or peer teaching evaluations, or at a minimum a reference from someone familiar with your teaching experience.
     
  5. roubs

    roubs Ph.D. Student

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    I also thought DoE had nothing to do with licensing, which I thought was a state-by-state affair but I could be wrong. I know at the schools I've attended there's very little if any official business to go through to be a TA.
     
  6. erg923

    erg923 Psychologist-Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)

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    That is true. My wife is a teacher and its different in every state. Also, its called "certification." There is no "license."
     
  7. dcc777

    dcc777

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    Great, thank you for all the replies!
     
  8. futureapppsy2

    futureapppsy2 Ed Psych PhD student Moderator Gold Donor

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    No, teaching licenses only apply strictly (and sometimes even not so much there, what with alternative certification) to K-12 public schools. Private K-12 schools may prefer or elect to hire only licensed teachers, but they can also choose not to.
     
  9. PsychPhDStudent

    PsychPhDStudent

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    Yep, no licensing at the college level as far as I know. :)
     
  10. AcronymAllergy

    AcronymAllergy Neuropsychologist Moderator

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    As others have said--no licensing requirements here, either. We just had to have our masters, after which we could complete a "Teaching of Psychology" (or something like that) course and be eligible to teach.
     
  11. Sanman

    Sanman O.G.

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    Sorry to horn in on the thread, but here is a question for those that have taught, I got through grad school on RA positions as I had a well funded lab and did not really have to teach. I was considering adjunct positions now that I am done and working my post-doc job. However, it has been difficult for me to get such a position as there is a glut of adjuncts in my area and I have limited teaching experience (guest lectures, running seminars for younger grad students and externs, etc). Any suggestions as to where to go/when to apply for that first teaching position. Of course, this is made all the more difficult in that I work full-time and my schedule is not hugely flexible. I considered online courses and things like DeVry or U of Phoenix as a first class. Thoughts?
     
  12. Pragma

    Pragma

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    The easiest place would probably be your own school. They know you best and would be more willing to provide supervision/support and give you a position over an outsider.

    Otherwise, keep guest lecturing when you can and send your CV out to other schools in the area, starting with ones where you have connections. I recommend applying from most prestige first to least prestige if you are cold calling. DeVry/Phoenix would be last on my list and I am not sure having a class from those places would help your future job prospects.
     
  13. Sanman

    Sanman O.G.

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    I would consider my school, but the 500 mile commute is a bit of a deal killer! :laugh:

    Actually, a professor mentioned a TT position opening up if I was interested, but I don't want to live there. I'm mostly interested in clinically oriented positions anyway, but I wanted get my hand into teaching as well.
     
  14. cara susanna

    cara susanna Predoctoral Intern

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    They would accept T-T applicants from their own program? Lucky!
     
  15. Pragma

    Pragma

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    Yeah I have heard of that happening, but much more often it is "leave the nest" and politics.
     
  16. PsychPhDStudent

    PsychPhDStudent

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    Our department's lecturers (on the rare occasion they exist) seem to be mostly grads from our program.
     
  17. Sanman

    Sanman O.G.

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    Well it has happened, but you never really know until you apply and see what the committee really thinks...which I did not. However, when there are limited opportunities in the geographic area, it helps both the university and the person.
     
  18. Pragma

    Pragma

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    That's common. Not tenure-track job offers at a lot of places.
     
  19. PsychPhDStudent

    PsychPhDStudent

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    For what it's worth, my undergrad does seem to like to offer their graduates (as in undergrads...we don't have a grad program) T-T jobs if they want to come back. It's pretty nice, but I know...unusual. My research probably couldn't work out there, but it's a nice thought.
     
  20. Pragma

    Pragma

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    I don't think we are talking about the same types of jobs here. I am talking about professorships within a PhD Psychology program (which would require a PhD and sometimes licensure). Oftentimes, departments do not hire their own students because of a) the attitude that students should go elsewhere and "leave the nest", b) that you can get more variety by hiring people from outside, c) "you hired their student but not mine" politics, and d) probably lots of other reasons.
     
  21. Pragma

    Pragma

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    I don't see how it would help the person. I was on the TT market this year and fortunately got a TT job, but it definitely makes you humble given the state of the academic job market. How would having fewer jobs in an area somehow make it easier for any candidate? More competition = more applicants. How does that help an applicant? Most people apply nationwide and some jobs get hundreds of applicants for one spot.
     
  22. PsychPhDStudent

    PsychPhDStudent

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    I was originally talking about the type of jobs the OP was interested in, but then I commented that my undergrad relatively frequently offers T-T jobs to former undergrads who did the department proud. They had to go elsewhere for grad school/internship/post doc so I don't see it as too incestuous.
     
  23. Pragma

    Pragma

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    Oh yeah that is a different story. I thought you were suggesting that people were offered TT positions with a BA/BS. My mistake.
     
  24. Sanman

    Sanman O.G.

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    For the few people that got jobs there, it meant they did not have to re-locate (a giant positive if your spouse/family cannot move) and the university got someone that stayed there and taught for years. My school had it's share of young national hotshots and a good number left after building a reputation. I am also not really talking R1 here as I went to a State program and there are smaller associated campuses as well aside from the flagship. I did most of my work at the med school and did not really associate with the undergraduate institution outside of an RA position there and classes, so no real ties there anyway.
     
  25. Pragma

    Pragma

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    Agreed, awesomeness. Fortunately that worked out for me (not at my home program, but within the same city).

    So you are saying that they would rather hire someone from their program, because they are more likely to be loyal and less likely to leave the department after building their credentials?

    I suppose I could see that being a part of the decision-making process. But that is in opposition to most of what I have heard from multiple places. Loyalty only gets you so far when it comes to entry-level tenured positions. Funding, potential, and research record are (rightfully, I think) usually considered as more important factors at many places.
     
  26. Sanman

    Sanman O.G.

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  27. Pragma

    Pragma

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    Do the faculty in these situations run into political issues in hiring their former students? For example, why do we hire your student and not MY student?

    I actually know someone who was hired for a TT job by their own program, so I know it happens. Heck, I was interested in my own school because I liked it so much. I am just saying that the vast majority of faculty at various places I have spoken with about this subject suggest that it is too messy politically and there are too many good reasons to hire from the outside.
     
  28. Sanman

    Sanman O.G.

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    I know of one or two that got hired because their chairperson was a big wig, but they were also post-docs at the school as well while other students left. In the case I was talking about, my program has people at the flagship campus and the med school. There really are not any professors that have grad students (doctoral level) of their own at the other campuses (they can be on diss committees and teach classes though).
     

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