MedIsInMyBlood

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When I got 9 interviews by the end of this summer, I was elated. I was sure I was going to get in somewhere. I was expecting multiple acceptances by around October/November and was expecting to have a choice of schools.

Well, 7 interviews later and I'm on 5 wait-lists (two at schools that don't rank their lists, two medium wait-lists, and one low wait-list) and have 2 rejections. I have completed 2 interviews recently and will receive word from those 2 schools in the next few weeks.

Is anyone out there with a similar experience?

Is this really rare? Or do schools not automatically accept many people right after the interview and put many ppl on the wait list? What do you think is the percentage of interviewees who get accepted right after the interview at most schools?
 
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Colbert

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Maybe it's something you're doing/saying at the interview. See if your school does practice interviews or has some resources you can access to see if you might be doing something wrong.

On the plus side, you're still on numerous waitlists, and there's a pretty good chance you get accepted off of one of them.
 

MLT2MT2DO

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Have you asked any of the schools you've been rejected/waitlisted what you could do to improve?
 
Aug 20, 2010
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damn dude, you just got me worried. i have been invited to 7 interviews so far and ive only gone on one. im hoping i wont be in your situation.

i agree with Colbert. there must be something wrong with the way you interview because you already got past everything else with your stats. good luck to you. maybe you'll get more interviews soon too. keep your hopes up!
 

Kevin Baker

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This is rare. Most schools end up taking >50% of people they interview. I'm not sure of the number of acceptees right after the interview, but I bet it is still high. I'd really focus on developing your interpersonal skills, and maybe even conduct an interview with someone, to see whats on the other side of the fence. You may not even want to prepare much for the interview, as if you're using the interview feedback section to memorize answers, this could be the problem.
 

cliquesh

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I think the acceptance rate for most osteopathic medical schools is like 50% once you get an interview. So if you interview at two schools, you should get in. You are either doing something strange or your grades are borderline.
 

koan

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I think it's pretty common for schools to put a lot of early interviewees on waitlist, until the season plays out a bit and they start forming a bulk of accepted students. It's a game for the schools too, in a way.

You should definitely be optimistic. If you're getting that many interviews, you are clearly "acceptable" material. I'd recommend getting somebody like a Pre-Health adviser to do a mock interview with you, and get some feedback quickly before your next 2 interviews.
 

swimchick

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I agree with the advice that's already been posted. If you're being rejected post-interview, it's most likely because of how you came across during the interview.
 
Aug 8, 2010
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Maybe it's something you're doing/saying at the interview. See if your school does practice interviews or has some resources you can access to see if you might be doing something wrong.

On the plus side, you're still on numerous waitlists, and there's a pretty good chance you get accepted off of one of them.
This. A wait-list is not a rejection and don't treat it that way. It sucks. For sure. But hang in there.
 

mmikey

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It is most likely your interview that is killing you. Most schools accept early to fill their class and secure deposits. I'm sorry but seek resources for interview help..
 

Sinfest

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Like others have said, it may be how you're interviewing. I think you should get a couple of your good friends, or a mentor, and have a mock interview with them. Take it seriously, and maybe they can provide you with some advice on how to improve your performance.

Good luck and keep your head up :)
 

Goro

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Your problem is either in the interview process, or in your file. If you have a less-than-stellar LOR, that may be hindering you.

In the interview, are you looking the interviewer(s) in the eye? Are you too nervous? At this point in the process, you should be used to it by now.

Coming across as an allopath-wannabe? Showing ignorance of osteopathy? Showing more interest in getting into med school, as opposed to actually wanting to take care of patients?
 

235750

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I'm getting some serious deja vu

I interviewed at 7 schools years ago and was only accepted to one I could not go to for family reasons. I emailed and called the other schools and asked, what was it??

One, which I won't name, said I spoke too much about knitting. I kid you not. Long story short, I come from a family of tailors and many of them don't speak English, and I don't speak their language either. So we knit and hang out. It came up because my interviewer asked what I did in my spare time, so I talked about my family and knitting. She acted like she didn't believe me so I pulled out a scarf I was working on. I told her why I thought it was fun, and said it was therapeutic. In the debriefing she said I should have brought a medical journal to read if I wanted to kill time and impress them.

After that it took me a few years to want to apply to medical school again. Honestly, I felt pretty hurt by that, not to mention completely disillusioned with the entire process.

3 other schools responded with a more believable yet perplexing answer: your MCAT was so great and your GPA so poor that you just made the cutoff. The then admissions dean at CU denver said in a phone interview that I'd have to be "the best candidate ever" in order to get win over my interviewer. Of course that's a ridiculous standard that I could not meet. Why they wasted my time and theirs...well I don't know. When I think of the thousands I spent on interviews, hotels and transportation to those schools...bah

So I had a bunch of waitlists that added up to nothing. But I tried again a few years after that to DO schools (and a few choice MD institutions) and things turned out well :thumbup: In fact, I made sure to bring my knitting stuff with me because I thought, f*** it, if a school thinks knitters aren't good enough for them, then I don't want them either. And at PCOM when I mentioned knitting, my interviewer smiled and pulled out a hat she was working on, and crazy coincidence we were using almost exactly the same material!

Sorry, I kind of hijacked this thread to vent. But honestly, if you read what I wrote, I think one of those two things could have happened to you.

Most schools won't bother telling you why they rejected you. A ---SHORT--- email to the assistant dean may work. But odds are, they won't respond. My undergrad had an interview workshop, maybe you could look into that
 
Aug 20, 2010
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I'm getting some serious deja vu

I interviewed at 7 schools years ago and was only accepted to one I could not go to for family reasons. I emailed and called the other schools and asked, what was it??

One, which I won't name, said I spoke too much about knitting. I kid you not. Long story short, I come from a family of tailors and many of them don't speak English, and I don't speak their language either. So we knit and hang out. It came up because my interviewer asked what I did in my spare time, so I talked about my family and knitting. She acted like she didn't believe me so I pulled out a scarf I was working on. I told her why I thought it was fun, and said it was therapeutic. In the debriefing she said I should have brought a medical journal to read if I wanted to kill time and impress them.

After that it took me a few years to want to apply to medical school again. Honestly, I felt pretty hurt by that, not to mention completely disillusioned with the entire process.

3 other schools responded with a more believable yet perplexing answer: your MCAT was so great and your GPA so poor that you just made the cutoff. The then admissions dean at CU denver said in a phone interview that I'd have to be "the best candidate ever" in order to get win over my interviewer. Of course that's a ridiculous standard that I could not meet. Why they wasted my time and theirs...well I don't know. When I think of the thousands I spent on interviews, hotels and transportation to those schools...bah

So I had a bunch of waitlists that added up to nothing. But I tried again a few years after that to DO schools (and a few choice MD institutions) and things turned out well :thumbup: In fact, I made sure to bring my knitting stuff with me because I thought, f*** it, if a school thinks knitters aren't good enough for them, then I don't want them either. And at PCOM when I mentioned knitting, my interviewer smiled and pulled out a hat she was working on, and crazy coincidence we were using almost exactly the same material!

Sorry, I kind of hijacked this thread to vent. But honestly, if you read what I wrote, I think one of those two things could have happened to you.

Most schools won't bother telling you why they rejected you. A ---SHORT--- email to the assistant dean may work. But odds are, they won't respond. My undergrad had an interview workshop, maybe you could look into that
the knitting problem is the dumbest reason not to take someone. people have different hobbies, why cant some ******* interview see that? glad you got into med school though! i like knitting too but im never patient enough to finish any projects i start haha
 
Nov 12, 2009
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this is alittle odd...i think it is most likely ur interview skills, have you rehearsed on any of the common questions? maybe u were lacking confidence during the interview? they are pretty good at spotting those....or maybe just a little out of luck..but well it is still early in the cycle to conclude anything, good luck!
 
Jul 2, 2010
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@ the OP, let us know a little about your background; scores, gpa, experiences etc. so we know we are dealing with.

Other than that, once you have an interview, the numbers aren't as important, you passed that test and now they just want to see who YOU are. So there has to be something you are doing in the interview that nobody is liking. I have a friend at a school that knows an interviewer very well. The interviewer had interviewed a guy with a 36 mcat and a 3.7 gpa, so on paper he was great, but he was rejected immediately b/c "he was a f***ing douchebag" (straight from the interviewers mouth). So just consider that (I am by no means calling you a douchebag btw), the interview is probably the most important step of the application process.
 

CopToEM

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Remember the most important thing... if they didn't like you, they would have rejected you. They didn't - they put you aside for a bit to see what else is out there and at the same time said, "don't get rid of this guy... we like him... but we need some more time to think about it."

As stated previously, that is by no means a rejection! At the end of the day, the best medical school in the country is the one who accepts you!
 
Jun 23, 2010
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Remember the most important thing... if they didn't like you, they would have rejected you. They didn't - they put you aside for a bit to see what else is out there and at the same time said, "don't get rid of this guy... we like him... but we need some more time to think about it."

As stated previously, that is by no means a rejection! At the end of the day, the best medical school in the country is the one who accepts you!
:thumbup:
 

TriagePreMed

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Sorry this is happening to you OP. You need to revisit your interviewing skills to see how you can do better. It sounds like you're good on paper but may be making a lot of mistakes on the interview.
 

DartosDO

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I think the acceptance rate for most osteopathic medical schools is like 50% once you get an interview. So if you interview at two schools, you should get in. You are either doing something strange or your grades are borderline.
Worst statistics EVER. Hope your not banking your acceptance based on that math.
 

cliquesh

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hah, I'm already a second year. It just shows the quality of DO students.
 

rjmn

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I think the acceptance rate for most osteopathic medical schools is like 50% once you get an interview. So if you interview at two schools, you should get in. You are either doing something strange or your grades are borderline.
I'm with Dartos on this one. This means that if you get 3 interviews, you have a 150% chance of getting in! :D
Just shows the quality of MD students.
 
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cliquesh

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What does this have to do with DO students? The statistics you posted are still bull****.
Because osteopathic medical schools like to accept applicants who cannot comprehend the laws of probability, like me, as well as applicants who cannot detect sarcasm off the internet.
 

TriagePreMed

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Because osteopathic medical schools like to accept applicants who cannot comprehend the laws of probability, like me, as well as applicants who cannot detect sarcasm off the internet.
It's just not that easy with text.
 
Oct 6, 2009
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Hang in there, OP.

I was somewhat confident when I started the application cycle. I thought I would have a decent chance to get into most DO schools..

BUT..

So far, I got 5 interview invites (only been to 3)..One acceptance, one waitlist, and one rejection.

Med school application process is just too random. You will never know what would happen next.

Anyway, good luck! (You probably should improve your interview skills..)
 

kuanileqa

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Feb 15, 2010
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Just remember. The purpose of an interview is for the school to see that you are a well-adjusted, socially adept, put together individual. If you go in terrified, scatter-brained or not well thought out on your stances, they will pass you by (even if you have stellar grades).

I knew someone who had a 3.9 and 40 on the MCAT but did not get in his first round because you just could not have a normal conversation with the guy!

They don't want to send out a really smart doctor who is not able to relate to patients even on the most basic levels.
 
Aug 19, 2010
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Wow. That's crazy. I don't see how you woudn't get off one of the 7 wait-list... or so one would think. Either way, I really wish you good luck in your next 2 interviews!!!
 
OP
M

MedIsInMyBlood

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Thank you to everyone who responded.

To answer some of your questions:

1. What could have been wrong during my interviews?

I don't think I was too nervous or anything like that. I actually think it may have been somewhat of the opposite. Given the fact that I had so many interviews lined up, I think that I didn't feel very anxious at all and perhaps you could say that I had no sense of urgency. Perhaps I was a little too calm and laid back?


2. Is my application on paper (GPA/MCAT/extracurriculars) borderline?

Before I got my 9 interviews, I did indeed think my application on paper was kind of borderline. But, after getting 9 interviews, I started to think my application on paper was great. I mean, how does a borderline applicant get 9 interviews?


3. Did I come off as just wanting to get into medical schools for other reasons than wanting to help others?

I don't know. I sincerely tried to answer every question honestly. I don't really have a "...and when my relative was diagnosed with cancer, I just knew that I wanted to be a doctor to help others in that situation" story.

4. Did I come off as ignorant to osteopathic medicine?

You be the judge: My answers to "Why DO?" were very upfront and honest: 1. DO schools emphasize primary care, which I believe will be my specialty of choice 2. OMM is a good option to have (an "extra tool on the tool belt" is how I described it) to treat patients, thought I realize that only 20-30% of all DO's use it consistently...

And I didn't really ever discuss the "whole patient approach", because I believe that MD's use this approach just as much as we will, and I've even seen studies that show no measurable difference between how a DO will look at patients as opposed to MD's. Thus, I didn't want to BS a response about the more whole patient approach that DO's have.


To iloveDrStill, that certainly reminds me of my situation. Good to see that things worked out for you later on.
 

TeamZissou

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the knitting problem is the dumbest reason not to take someone. people have different hobbies, why cant some ******* interview see that? glad you got into med school though! i like knitting too but im never patient enough to finish any projects i start haha
Seriously. The fact that whole thing happened brings into question the value of the "interview" as well as the qualifications of those who are conducting this "interview".
 
Jun 8, 2010
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Thank you to everyone who responded.

To answer some of your questions:

1. What could have been wrong during my interviews?

I don't think I was too nervous or anything like that. I actually think it may have been somewhat of the opposite. Given the fact that I had so many interviews lined up, I think that I didn't feel very anxious at all and perhaps you could say that I had no sense of urgency. Perhaps I was a little too
calm and laid back?
I guarantee that wasn't your problem, unless you were kicking your feet up on their desk and telling off color jokes, using inappropriate language (don't laugh, I saw this one happen at an interview), or generally talking to your interviewers like they were your beer buddies. Your interviewers should want you to be comfortable, but still professional.

Also, you might want to leave out the only 20-30% of DO's use OMT. That is an unnecessary add on that can be taken positively or negatively, but either way it is a risk that is not worth taking for next to no conversational value.

Another suggestion is to think about this like a medical school interview, not a DO interview. I hear people say "well it's the same as MD this or that..." Of course it is, so why not talk about it? Just because an MD is one way doesn't mean that a DO isn't that way and vice versa. So, if you think a physician is a particular way, then talk about it. Don't look at the question so narrowly. Remember the question is first and foremost, "why do you want to be a doctor," THEN why a DO, even though it's not asked that way.

Either way, I wish you luck at your next two interviews and that you get off of some of those waitlists.

Seriously. The fact that whole thing happened brings into question the value of the "interview" as well as the qualifications of those who are conducting this "interview".
I can't tell you how much I agree with this. I'm just glad that that poster ended up getting in.
 
Sep 19, 2009
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OP, Don't be afraid to mention things that you assume are "obvious". Mention it anyhow, how it fits into you as an applicant, and then use it as a selling point. Just like the integrative/whole person aspect of osteopathy you mentioned. Who cares if MD's do it too?! Make sure they know that you know what all it entails as it relates to osteopathic medicine. Sell the obvious as well as the subtle.

All the following is going to come across cocky as all get out. It's only because I'm going to condense it into a reasonable size and format for an internet forum. You cannot afford to be cocky. Be confident and proud, but never cross that line with interviewers, receptionists, or janitors. Evaluate your social skills and abilities (honestly) and make efforts to improve them regardless. The fact is, you've been doing something wrong.

Interviews are sales... it's just about selling yourself. This is not the time to be humble, or let your application speak for itself. Only YOU can give it a voice and after all, it is YOU! Bring yourself to the table and tell them why they shouldn't pass you by, even if your application is mediocre. You're the best damn thing to walk in that office all day and you need to convince them of it, while not being an arrogant jerk.

That mentioned... do your homework!! Know the school, what it stands for, where it came from, what kinds of research (if any) they do, and where it thinks its going as an organization. Figure out how you fit into all that. Tailor your answers beforehand to the major questions asked at most interviews (the big 3).

Address your weak points IF they bring them up, but frame it more like, "Yeah... X is a known difficulty. It's something I work on all the time by Y'ing. What I've learned from that is BLAHBLAH, and that really has helped me become who I am." I should know. I FAILED a course 4 times in a row during undergrad! No lie.

I am an underdog (decent MCAT, lower end GPA)... or was. I went into my first interview (of 5... I've got a breadth of "life experience") and tried to play the humble game and let my experiences and achievements speak for themselves. I mentioned them, but never brought any depth or volume to them with my interviewers. Guess what? Rejected.

I have gone in to three others since then and sold myself like Billy Mays would've. Now I'm trying to decide which of those three to go to, or if I should hold out for the last school next month.

You need to bring it OP! This isn't the playground and all those smiling faces at the interviews aren't your allies (until you get in that is!). You are among equals (and superiors) at this level of competition and they'll be out to make sure it's them over you. We can all be friends once we're sharing the trials of medical school.

Maybe I'll see you at my next interview. I'll smile and shake your hand. I'll look you in the eye and use your first name every chance I get. Then I'll go into the interview and tell them exactly why they should choose me over you (figuratively though, I never mention my competition even indirectly)... and know that I'm planning to beat you, OP! It's not personal, I promise.

Afterward, we'll go get drinks together at the hotel bar.

Good luck.
 
Mar 30, 2010
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OP, how many schools are you applying to and are you applying only osteopathic or both MD and DO?
 

JeetKuneDo

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I'm getting some serious deja vu

I interviewed at 7 schools years ago and was only accepted to one I could not go to for family reasons. I emailed and called the other schools and asked, what was it??

One, which I won't name, said I spoke too much about knitting. I kid you not. Long story short, I come from a family of tailors and many of them don't speak English, and I don't speak their language either. So we knit and hang out. It came up because my interviewer asked what I did in my spare time, so I talked about my family and knitting. She acted like she didn't believe me so I pulled out a scarf I was working on. I told her why I thought it was fun, and said it was therapeutic. In the debriefing she said I should have brought a medical journal to read if I wanted to kill time and impress them.

After that it took me a few years to want to apply to medical school again. Honestly, I felt pretty hurt by that, not to mention completely disillusioned with the entire process.

3 other schools responded with a more believable yet perplexing answer: your MCAT was so great and your GPA so poor that you just made the cutoff. The then admissions dean at CU denver said in a phone interview that I'd have to be "the best candidate ever" in order to get win over my interviewer. Of course that's a ridiculous standard that I could not meet. Why they wasted my time and theirs...well I don't know. When I think of the thousands I spent on interviews, hotels and transportation to those schools...bah

So I had a bunch of waitlists that added up to nothing. But I tried again a few years after that to DO schools (and a few choice MD institutions) and things turned out well :thumbup: In fact, I made sure to bring my knitting stuff with me because I thought, f*** it, if a school thinks knitters aren't good enough for them, then I don't want them either. And at PCOM when I mentioned knitting, my interviewer smiled and pulled out a hat she was working on, and crazy coincidence we were using almost exactly the same material!

Sorry, I kind of hijacked this thread to vent. But honestly, if you read what I wrote, I think one of those two things could have happened to you.

Most schools won't bother telling you why they rejected you. A ---SHORT--- email to the assistant dean may work. But odds are, they won't respond. My undergrad had an interview workshop, maybe you could look into that
That is bs. That person that interviewed you must have had something stuck up her behind. I'd think it'd be pretty tool-like to whip out the latest article from the New England Journal of Medicine while waiting for an interview.
 

mmikey

Accepted!
Jan 29, 2010
237
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That is bs. That person that interviewed you must have had something stuck up her behind. I'd think it'd be pretty tool-like to whip out the latest article from the New England Journal of Medicine while waiting for an interview.
One would instantly become a giant tool if they whipped it out.
 
Nov 26, 2009
7
0
Status
Pre-Medical
@OP- Good luck with the last two interviews; maybe they'll be more uplifting (?) I mean, 7 interviews is quite amazing and something I can only hope to achieve; I wish someone told you what was going on lol.

@iloveDrStill- haha, I can sort of relate (although my story doesnt have to do with the healthcare setting). I once interviewed at a magazine company only to be rejected during the 3rd (and final) interview. The reason? I picked the wrong magazine off the coffee table :rolleyes:. Apparently, the smart thing would've been to read the company's magazine during break...
 

drctother

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OP: Well for starters I think you are interviewing wrong, I dont think its stats. If I had to guess, its because you were probably giving cookie-cut pre-med answers. When asked why you want to study medicine do you say "well i want to save the world by curing HIV and cancer"? If you give answers like that, your 0/7 makes sense.

When I was asked "why medicine" I did give part of the cookie-cut answer "I want to make a difference" except I applied it using a very personal story and had both my interviewers crying. And no, im sorry but i know everyone thinks they have a personal story because Uncle X broke his leg and blah blah, but thats not good enough for admissions (I hope). If you are compassionate about giving answers, you will "touch" the interviewer. If you do give a personal story, make sure its actually something thats worth choosing to go into medicine. Not "my great grandpa died"

If you dont have a personal story, thats fine. For example, if I had decided to study medicine for other reasons (besides my personal one), I would talk about how I love to problem solve, I love meeting new people and building relationships, I love science etc

Also, if you applied to both MD and DO....maybe when they ask "why DO" your answer isnt believable enough. I ONLY applied to DO and I explained this

I dunno, in summary I find the 0/7 suspicious with regards to how you are interviewing. Fact: you get invited to most interviews because they are interested in you, thus you must be proving them wrong in the interview. Maybe you come off as extreme with your emotions (ie TOO relaxed or TOO stressed) which might show that you are weak with stressful situations. If this was combined with cookie-cut answers....well....

Good luck, you have the stats with the resume clearly or you wouldn't have gotten 9 interviewers. Although I disagree with this, the system will allow you to get into a medical school eventually because of your #s and resume regardless of how well you interview....its a #'s game and if you have had 9 interviews, you have a resume.
 

Prncssbuttercup

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Ok, here's my $.02, I think we're all in agreement it's the interview. No candidate would get 9 interviews if their stats were crap. That said, what is going wrong in the interview... You knew you had 7 or 9 lined up at the beginning, sooo, I am concerned you weren't just comfortable, you may have been cocky or lackadaisical, both of which would be bad. I am not saying you knowingly came off this way, but it is entirely possible that you subconsciously did it...

My coworker was waitlisted last year, and when he asked why the response was "he didn't display a passion for lifelong learning, he didn't impress them beyond the stats on paper, he came across as "overly confident", and he didn't have a strong-enough passion for medicine" he and I went over the questions he was asked in his interview, and were able to pinpoint where he went wrong:
they asked what he liked to read in his spare time: he said Forbes (Wrong answer), he was asked why he wanted to go into medicine: he said he has a passion for helping people, but in his mind he's thinking, "cause I want to be the boss" (wrong attitude)

Those two questions cost him his seat... had he answered differently on those two questions, he wouldn't have ever been my coworker...
 

panasonic52

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Going off of what SBB2016 said, think back to what your answers were. If you can remember some of them, review them with a friend to get their honest opinion. If you're comfortable with it, you could even post some of the answers here to get others' opinions. Either way, you definitely need outside analysis. Reviewing the answers in your own head wont help because you could be blinded to how they came off.
 

Prncssbuttercup

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For the record, because I will be applying at the same school, and hopefully interviewing, I took note of those questions, especially the question about reading in my spare time... Clearly they were looking for reading books on science or medicine, etc.... They basically looked at his response as a "you're coming for the $$"... as such, I am listening to audiobooks on medicine while I drive these days, as at least I won't be lying if I'm asked such a question!
 
May 12, 2010
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Seattle, WA
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Medical Student
For the record, because I will be applying at the same school, and hopefully interviewing, I took note of those questions, especially the question about reading in my spare time... Clearly they were looking for reading books on science or medicine, etc.... They basically looked at his response as a "you're coming for the $$"... as such, I am listening to audiobooks on medicine while I drive these days, as at least I won't be lying if I'm asked such a question!
While it is good to read books on science and medicine, I think they are also looking for reading something nonscience related. In most of my interviews I was asked what was the last nonscience book you read. I think they want to see that you have interests outside of medicine.

For the person who said they read Forbes that looks bad because it sounds like they are interested in money.

If I were you I would start reading nonscience books because they like to see that you are interested in other things. In a couple of my interviews, I had just read some James Patterson books and the interviewers and I spent time talking about them because they had heard of them and wanted to know how they were.

If you read the medical books because you like them, that's fine. but if you are reading the books so you can say that you read medical books in your spare time, the interviewers will see right through that. They want to see who you are, so trying to be someone else might actually hurt your chances of getting in.
 

panasonic52

7+ Year Member
Dec 7, 2009
310
20
Texas
^^ I really like James Patterson's books. But yeah, like futuredoc said, they'll be able to see through it if you didn't start reading something out of pure interest. My interviewers only asked "What do you like to read?" I told them I love thriller books and also fiction books that include ancient civilizations (mainly for the mythology). I don't believe I went wrong with it. I had really nice conversations with the interviewers who asked that. One even said his father is really into greek mythology, but he never understood why. So he was intrigued about why I love it.

Just be genuine. Don't look for the "perfect" answer. Obviously there are some things that should be avoided. But for the most part, if you're downright honest with them, then the communication is going to go a lot smoother.
 

Prncssbuttercup

Established Member -- Family Medicine Resident
7+ Year Member
Jul 15, 2010
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Where ever I am, I wish I was in Versailles
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It actually does interest me, but for the most part, right now, I don't have time to read for fun... I did however, read The Tiger, which while non-fiction, isn't a science book, but I've been waiting for it to come out since 1997... Either way, I agree, but I until recently, didn't do much reading of any kind, so I think that anything is a step in the right direction...