• A new admissions hurdle is becoming more common: the CASPer test. Learn more about it at a free webinar hosted by SDN and PrepMatch on May 6th. Register now!

Taurus

Paul Revere of Medicine
15+ Year Member
Jul 27, 2004
3,098
353
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician

19 most-recruited physician specialties
Angie Stewart - Tuesday, July 14th, 2020

Healthcare recruiting activity is shifting toward medical specialties, with this category representing 78 percent of Merritt Hawkins' physician search engagements in a year's time.

Merritt Hawkins, which operates under AMN Healthcare, is a national physician recruitment and healthcare consulting firm. Merritt Hawkins based its "2020 Review of Physician and Advanced Practitioner Recruiting Incentives and the Impact of COVID-19" on a sample of 3,251 permanent physician and advanced practitioner search engagements conducted from April 1, 2019, to March 31, 2020.

The 19 most-requested searches by specialty:

1. Family medicine
2. Nurse practitioner
3. Psychiatry
4. Radiology
5. Internal medicine
6. OB-GYN
7. Cardiology
8. Hematology and oncology
9. Physician assistant
10. Anesthesiology
11. Hospitalist
12. Certified registered nurse anesthetists
13. Gastroenterology
14. Neurology
15. Orthopedic surgery
16. Pediatrics
17. Urology
18. Dermatology
19. Pulmonology
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Cognovi

Knowledge worker
5+ Year Member
Feb 10, 2016
631
685
bit.ly
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
1) How many physician specialties are there?
2) When did NP, PA, and CRNA become physician specialties?
 
  • Like
  • Haha
Reactions: 11 users

redoitall

7+ Year Member
Mar 30, 2012
429
98
The Big State, USA
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
FYI
I just heard some stats, which I believe are legit, presented at a national meeting. Now these are pre-covid. They relate to a survey sent to radiology practicies. I don't know what the response rate was, but it seems significant.
1- Prior to COVID 90% of practicies were hiring
2- 50% of practices said they were desperate
3- The three most difficult specialties to hire were in order Neuro, Breast and MSK.

Since COVID, approx volumes decreased by about 30 to 40%, so these numbers will adjust. But still radiology should be doing relatively OK given the current need.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 4 users
About the Ads

GadRads

7+ Year Member
Oct 13, 2012
602
344
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
I wonder where radiology/nuclear medicine falls on the demand schedule.
 

Abraxas65

5+ Year Member
May 30, 2014
304
188
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
1) How many physician specialties are there?
2) When did NP, PA, and CRNA become physician specialties?


In-regards to #2 its when physicians started acting like whipped dogs instead of the leaders of medicine and therefore the healthcare system as a whole.
 

geniusindisguise

2+ Year Member
Sep 6, 2017
11
1

19 most-recruited physician specialties
Angie Stewart - Tuesday, July 14th, 2020

Healthcare recruiting activity is shifting toward medical specialties, with this category representing 78 percent of Merritt Hawkins' physician search engagements in a year's time.

Merritt Hawkins, which operates under AMN Healthcare, is a national physician recruitment and healthcare consulting firm. Merritt Hawkins based its "2020 Review of Physician and Advanced Practitioner Recruiting Incentives and the Impact of COVID-19" on a sample of 3,251 permanent physician and advanced practitioner search engagements conducted from April 1, 2019, to March 31, 2020.

The 19 most-requested searches by specialty:

1. Family medicine
2. Nurse practitioner
3. Psychiatry
4. Radiology
5. Internal medicine
6. OB-GYN
7. Cardiology
8. Hematology and oncology
9. Physician assistant
10. Anesthesiology
11. Hospitalist
12. Certified registered nurse anesthetists
13. Gastroenterology
14. Neurology
15. Orthopedic surgery
16. Pediatrics
17. Urology
18. Dermatology
19. Pulmonology


Per full report: “high number of practicing physicians, such as family medicine, will generate a comparatively high number of searches. But how does the picture look if specialties are ranked by number of search engagements/job openings as a percent of all active physicians in a given specialty, or by what Merritt Hawkins calls “absolute demand?”

1. HEM/ONC.
1.1%
2. RADIOLOGY
0.8%
3. PSYCHIATRY
0.6%
4. UROLOGY
0.6%
5. CARDIOLOGY
0.5%
6. FAMILY MEDICINE
0.5%
7. GASTROENTEROLOGY
0.5%
8. NEUROLOGY
0.5%
9. OB/GYN
0.4%
10. DERMATOLOGY
0.4%“


Even more impressive when adjusted for speciality size.
 

NDcienporciento100

2+ Year Member
Feb 3, 2019
325
139
Per full report: “high number of practicing physicians, such as family medicine, will generate a comparatively high number of searches. But how does the picture look if specialties are ranked by number of search engagements/job openings as a percent of all active physicians in a given specialty, or by what Merritt Hawkins calls “absolute demand?”

1. HEM/ONC.
1.1%
2. RADIOLOGY
0.8%
3. PSYCHIATRY
0.6%
4. UROLOGY
0.6%
5. CARDIOLOGY
0.5%
6. FAMILY MEDICINE
0.5%
7. GASTROENTEROLOGY
0.5%
8. NEUROLOGY
0.5%
9. OB/GYN
0.4%
10. DERMATOLOGY
0.4%“


Even more impressive when adjusted for speciality size.
1) How many physician specialties are there?
2) When did NP, PA, and CRNA become physician specialties?
I believe in a not to far off future they will make pathways for NPs and PAs to become more and more autonomous. Financially they make less then half a non specialist and a quarter of a specialist. Insurance and people wielding the power of money are in charge and most of them see only dollar signs. I personally feel that procedural fields and highly subspecialized fields like radiology will be the last to go. But in the family practice world PAs for better or worse are already functioning independent.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

2brads

5+ Year Member
Jan 4, 2014
52
61
I would keep the MH numbers in perspective (especially the starting salaries). The practices who end up utilizing MH to recruit are doing so because for whatever reason they cannot recruit appropriate candidates themselves. Typically this is because of location. So the MH starting salaries are skewed upwards because the groups using MH are essentially desperate. If you are just out of fellowship looking for your first job, do not use this data as an anchor point to start negotiations. In other words, don’t get an offer then try to say “But MH data shows the typical starting salary of $423k”. Most starting salaries for good practices in places you’d like to live are somewhat less than that.
 
About the Ads

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.