wadels

7+ Year Member
Oct 24, 2011
58
37
Texas
Status
Pre-Medical
I have a strong history of involvement and leadership in college. I have also done a lot of research (800+ hours, plus holding a full time research position now). However, I haven't been able to do much shadowing, so I'm working on that aspect right now, trying to find a hospital that will take me in for an extended period of time.

I've applied to roughly 10 "lower tier" MD schools across the country. What are my chances of getting in? Would they improve after I successfully complete an SMP?
 

GrapesofRath

2+ Year Member
May 5, 2015
5,320
3,803
Status
Non-Student
Key question is do you have an upward trend? If you have several recent semesters of strong work it'll definitely help your case.

A good plan would be to give all the Texas schools a shot this cycle(except UT San Antonio and Baylor) and see what happens. If it doesn't work out, do an SMP or something else to raise your GPA(DIY post-bacc works also) and ace it. That will help your chances alot. Not sure I would really recommend bothering with OOS lower tiers, gyngyn always talks about how many of those schools don't consider texas residents because they know how much of a long shot it is for them to attend.
 
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wadels

7+ Year Member
Oct 24, 2011
58
37
Texas
Status
Pre-Medical
Key question is do you have an upward trend? If you have several recent semesters of strong work it'll definitely help your case.

A good plan would be to give all the Texas schools a shot this cycle(except UT San Antonio and Baylor) and see what happens. If it doesn't work out, do an SMP or something else to raise your GPA(DIY post-bacc works also) and ace it. That will help your chances alot. Not sure I would really recommend bothering with OOS lower tiers, gyngyn always talks about how many of those schools don't consider texas residents because they know how much of a long shot it is for them to attend.
Thanks for the advice. I guess I'll start my TMDSAS today then. Hopefully that train hasn't left the station yet...

If you don't mind, could you elaborate on what you mean by a long shot? As in the schools don't think that Texas residents will end up attending?
 

GrapesofRath

2+ Year Member
May 5, 2015
5,320
3,803
Status
Non-Student
Thanks for the advice. I guess I'll start my TMDSAS today then. Hopefully that train hasn't left the station yet...

If you don't mind, could you elaborate on what you mean by a long shot? As in the schools don't think that Texas residents will end up attending?
The track record of Texas applicants leaving the state for medical school is so poor that many simply don't bother considering them anymore. Those who do leave Texas for medical school either a) get into a top tier school b) get alot of good merit money that serves as incentive for them to leave.

If you haven't started your app I would strongly recommend waiting till next cycle to apply. As is, your at best a borderline candidate with that sGPA, even top candidates put themselves at a real disadvantage applying this late. Wait till next cycle and by doing that you have a shot to improve your GPA over that time which will really help your case if a year from now you can apply with a sGPA in the 3.25-3.35 type range instead of 3.07 while also having an upward trend
 
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wadels

7+ Year Member
Oct 24, 2011
58
37
Texas
Status
Pre-Medical
The track record of Texas applicants leaving the state for medical school is so poor that many simply don't bother considering them anymore. Those who do leave Texas for medical school either a) get into a top tier school b) get alot of good merit money that serves as incentive for them to leave.

If you haven't started your app I would strongly recommend waiting till next cycle to apply. As is, your at best a borderline candidate with that sGPA, even top candidates put themselves at a real disadvantage applying this late. Wait till next cycle and by doing that you have a shot to improve your GPA over that time which will really help your case if a year from now you can apply with a sGPA in the 3.25-3.35 type range instead of 3.07 while also having an upward trend
Huh, that's interesting. I never knew they looked at Texas students that way. Kinda sucks...

Yeah, that's what I thought. Now for improving my GPA, everyone talks about this, but I'm graduated and working full time, so how would I go about that? Just sign up for a few upper level science classes and hope that they fit into my work schedule?
 

GrapesofRath

2+ Year Member
May 5, 2015
5,320
3,803
Status
Non-Student
Huh, that's interesting. I never knew they looked at Texas students that way. Kinda sucks...

Yeah, that's what I thought. Now for improving my GPA, everyone talks about this, but I'm graduated and working full time, so how would I go about that? Just sign up for a few upper level science classes and hope that they fit into my work schedule?
Well the odds for you of getting into a TX school are far better than getting into those lower tier OOS schools anyway.

However you can manage to take the classes is what you'll need to do. The more upper level classes you can take the better. Like I said if a year from now you can apply with a 3.4/3.3 instead of a 3.3/3.07 it'll help your case alot. Obviously you have to do what you have to do pay bills and make ends meet but realize in terms of medical school admission improving your GPA is a far bigger priority than gaining any kind of work or research experience. Like I said, obviously if you need to work significant hours in order to pay bills you have to do what you have to do, but you really do need to find a way, however long or whatever it takes to get some good upper level science grades. If you have to work significant hours and can't take as many classes, perhaps try and spread out your classes over two years instead of one. Obviously not ideal, but if you wanna get into med school you gotta make sacrifices along the way(hopefully your MCAT doesn't expire soon). Good luck.
 
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