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4th Year Advice

Discussion in 'Pediatrics' started by ESPNdeportes, Mar 8, 2007.

  1. ESPNdeportes

    ESPNdeportes Member
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    So 3rd year is winding down, and I've made the decision to go into Peds! We're starting to plan our 4th year rotations, so naturally I'm full of questions.

    My goal in 4th year is to become as prepared for intern year as possible, while still having a little bit of fun :) So, I want to take as many peds electives as I can.

    My school has only 3 months of required rotations that I cannot fulfill with a peds rotation: Two months of sub-I's in medicine, and 1 month neuroscience (could possibly do child neuro but its a lottery system so I'm not banking on it). I'm currently signed up for a Peds sub-I in July, and we have an outpatient requirement that I can fulfill with peds.

    So, my question is what electives in peds should I take to best prepare for internship?

    Here is what I'm planning on taking in addition to the sub-I and outpatient month: 1 month PICU, 1 month NICU, 1 month ID. I also want to take an elective in derm because I don't think I've gotten very good exposure so far and of course, because its an easy month. If I take all of that I would get my required 9 months of rotations plus my two months off.

    So what do you think? Any reccomendations? Thanks in advance
     
  2. 14022

    14022 Unregistered Abuser
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    Honestly, I think you are crazy. NICU and PICU? That's insane. I would do one at most, maybe even neither one. My required sub-I was in the NICU and it maybe made my first week of NICU my intern year a bit easier, but after that all my co-interns who didnt take NICU in med school were at the same level. PICU you wont likely so until your second year, so by that time the experience really wont be that valuable. I really dont think anything really prepares you well for intern year. It is going to be hard regardless of how much you do this year. If you HAVE to do one, definately do NICU since in most programs you will be in the NICU in your intern year, unlike PICU. Other than that, take rotations that are interesting to you. If you want to do fellowship, I would do a rotation in that area to meet some people and get some exposure.

    BUT since you probably already decided that you aren't going to take it easy, I would recommend a few things. If your school is like mine and allowed 2 week electives, I would try to do two weeks in a few of these things....peds radiology (learn what test to order in certain clinical situations and get a leg up on reading basic xrays and ct's)...peds ent (look at as many ears as you can...it is by far the hardest clinical exam skill in my opinion). Anything longer than 2 weeks in these would be miserable. I think peds ER is also good. Good mix of actual emergency cases and primary care cases being seen in the ER. You may do a few procedures as well. And you learn how to figure out what the kids have and how to go about figuring it out since many kids come up to the floor from the ER already with a work-up and diagnosis.

    But please dont stress out too much about being prepared for internship. Have fun and try to decompress as much as possible 4th year! :D
     
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  3. oldbearprofessor

    Staff Member Administrator Rocket Scientist Physician Faculty Verified Expert 10+ Year Member

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    I agree that doing both PICU and NICU as a 4th yr med student is a bit much. What about going overseas for a month or two? If, as your user name suggests, you habla español, there are lots of good possibilities.

    Rads is a good suggestion as is derm. What about a community service month, epidemiology or something like that?

    good luck and let us know how it goes.

    OBP
     
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  4. OP
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    ESPNdeportes

    ESPNdeportes Member
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    Hehe thanks for the suggestions. Guess I'm a little over ambitious, but I really haven't talked to anyone so I had no idea!

    I've set up a meeting with my schools chair to chat about things.

    I guess no PICU but instead I'll sign up for a month in hem/onc or cardiology
     
  5. UVa2005

    UVa2005 Junior Member
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    I completely agree with the above posts. You are going to be doing pediatrics the rest of your life. This is the time you get to explore things you won't have much exposure to later in life. You can still do a peds focus (like peds derm, peds radiology, etc) however I agree with other non-peds things or even going abroad. Have fun!
     
  6. blanche

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    I would have to echo the 'explore other things' sentiment. As a current 4th yr, I've done a few peds rotations but really tried to see things that I won't get a chance to again. You don't realize it (especially during 3rd year!) but being a medstudent has privledges. You can rotate through different specialities and be relatively ignorant, and it's entirely ok--even expected. You don't have the responsibility of a resident yet. I wanted to see radiation oncology, ophthalmology, radiology, anesthesia and ENT so that at least when the time comes to call a consult or review a patient's chart, I have some vague idea of their language. You'd be surprised, just a brief rotation on various specialities can teach you a whole lot--what sort of exam they expect prior to seeing a patient, for example.
     
  7. group_theory

    group_theory EX-TER-MIN-ATE!'
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    Nothing wrong with doing both PICU and NICU ... I did both as a sub-I and they were all very fun and a great learning experience. It is certainly good exposure to the field and might convince you to head towards Peds Critical Care or Neonatology as a career (a good head start esp for peds critical care as PGY2 may be a little too late to decide if you want to go into it or not)

    Besides, it is never too early to understand vents, ABG/VBG/CBGs, and TPNs/PPNs ... as well as fluid management in kids. Also good ID exposure too

    I can honestly say, even though the hours were long, I had a fun time in both the PICU and the NICU.

    I also did adolescent medicine and am now convinced that it is certainly not for me.

    -Group_theory
    (currently a MS4, since I don't want to give any misconception)
     
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  8. OP
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    ESPNdeportes

    ESPNdeportes Member
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    Well, thanks for the help guys. Got our scheduling done today.

    In addition to my two sub-i's in medicine, and one month neuroscience, I signed up for:

    1 month peds sub-i
    1 month away TBD
    1 month peds ID
    2 weeks peds radiology
    2 weeks ekg
    1 month peds ED
    1 month derm

    2 weeks off in November, 4 weeks in January off, 2 weeks off in March (trip to Vegas!!). Will also be going on two mission trips through my church throughout the year.

    I'm definitely excited about my schedule. Good balance of rotations, not too tough, but I'm definitely not slacking.
     

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