1. What do you find most helpful? Give us your feedback on the 2019 SDN Member Survey to help further the SDN mission (and win prizes!)
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Hey Guest! Check out the 3 MCAT Study Plan Options listed in the 'stickies' area at the top of the forums (BoomBoom, SN2ed, and MCATJelly). Let us know which you like best.

    Also, we now offer a MCAT Test-Prep Exhibitions Forum where you can ask questions directly from the test-prep services.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. This forum is for support and discussion only. Please promote test prep materials/services (including AMAs) in the Special Offers subforum only. Thanks!
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Dismiss Notice

a little strategy for a desperate 2nd timer..please!!

Discussion in 'MCAT: Medical College Admissions Test' started by trustforward, Mar 10, 2007.

  1. trustforward

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2007
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    3
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    alright, i'll be brief: took the january MCAT (1st time) and looks like i'll need to take it again.. (luckily i forcast my own fate well and i registered for the may 11th exam about 3 days after i took it in january.)
    so there's T-2 months until the may MCAT, and i'm finding myself almost more overwhelmed this time around b/c i'm not recalling everything well enough to just practice, yet there's certainly not enough time to retake notes, etc. etc. (plus i have only a few hours/ day during the week to study). anyone been in this boat? any direction would be much appreciated:scared:
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  2. lifeistough

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Stay focused. Realizing that you can take the time you have, allocating a schedule, in this case of panic, I suggest. Why? Schedule promotes structure, stability in times of anxiety. Focus on taking the panic "energy" and transforming into "intensive" studying.

    Neighbor, before beginning to start building the house, we need a plan, and layout of what materials we have and will need to get. Once we have checked ourself that the material and a course of schedule that is beneficial to you is created, we can now start putting the bricks together.

    I cannot stress how important it is that in this process to remain calm. First, we can start by telling ourself that the time is constant. During break at work, maybe bring some flashcards you might have made last night and review some of the notes that you made. Create pictures and mnemonics for yourself to help you remember concepts.

    Lay bricks on one at a time. For example, I am weak or not sure about work-kinetic energy theorem. I need to review that. OH no! What about the oxygen containing compounds, I don't know that either!! Tell your mind that you realize you are weak in an area or areas (speaking of myself), but that I need to first focus on one concept before I can focus on the other.

    Wow, what just happened. Well, the student who was in panic, just took charge and was firm and realized his/her strengths, but also told themself that if I am going to improve panicing isn't going to help. Now your mind knows that you have a plan, so the mind is saying, well, things may be a mess (in my case, as I am studying for this exam, too) but at least I know that I have a plan and that I am going to master a concept one at a time.


    Imagine 45 rubber ball being frantically thrown to your side of room. You have to put them into the basket bin before the trash is going to be taken up at a certain constant time. You have to choose what the plan is. You can aimlessly try to grab all into your arms and put them in. Impossible, right?

    Or you can act quickly, and hold one ball, walk over to the trash and throw it in. You repeat the process. When you are holding ball 24 notice the time, 34 notice the time. When the clock stops and the trash man comes to take it, you know you have done your best. You were faithful to the plan.

    There may be some balls still on the floor, but there was not enough time. You did your best. Basically, stay calm, master a concept at a time, (you can do this by not comparing the one concept to all the other concepts that are left.



    Remember, one brick at a time. If you are not happy, by the last day to reschedule an MCAT exam (April 5 for April 12 test date) count the ball already but in. If you have put in many, take the test, if not push back date and continue with plan. I hope this has helped.


    Best regards, (the bricks can be found on MCAT interpretive manual 2005, on www.aamc.corg
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  3. docolive

    docolive DOColive
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2005
    Messages:
    832
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    lifeistough---that was awesome!!
     
  4. neurofreak

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2007
    Messages:
    467
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student
    what i would do is go over all the concepts and not focus too much on the details (remembering the big picture is really really important and may be a reason for why you didn't do as well in jan). but i'd also look at the score and try to pinpoint what went wrong. was it the verbal? did you run out of time? were you nervous? unsure of the material? try to figure out EXACTLY what went wrong because otherwise extra "studying" may be futile.

    gluck. rape that test in may :)
     
  5. lifeistough

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2005
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    neighbor trustforward:

    I forgot one other important thing. When the day approaches, i.e. May 9 before 11:59 p.m.(last day to reschedule for May 16 test date), you must remember that you did your best. You can forget everything I said, I just remember this: You did your best and now you (on that day i.e. May 9) will choose to reschedule or continue with the day of test. What is important is that you make that decision to move forward or stay at camp and work a little harder.

    Look at it as an investment. You get to decide when to take the test based on how you feel if you are prepared, (exciting, right?) Somebody told me this and it helped, (name is Alex) so I am only telling you this because I would expect the same from others (unprofitable servant).



    Because you mentioned that you didn't pull a high score, first time, aim really high. I heard a true story from an honorable prisoner of war from our country in Vietnam. While he was captured, the others in the cell would keep saying, this "month" we'll be out. This "month" came by and nothing happened. This went on, and some didn't get out. Why? Broken heart. They set a time, and when it didn't happen they were sad. And kept pushing. The POW I am speaking of, though, said "I'll get out" didn't put a time on it, because he honestly didn't know. In the same way, trustforward, you want to get lets say a 35+, the second time around, to send a message out to the medical schools. You don't know when you'll get it, but you will.


    And finally, I remember being in a position in a high jumping board in a pool with "buddies" kept saying common go, go. I felt really uncomfortable, it made me want to wait longer and maybe not go. I was afraid. Some will argue, if you wait to long, you might quit. No, I disagree. You quit, when you step off the diving pool. The trade of practicing medicine is a worthy field, what an amazing honor to get to serve people. And when the patient comes in, he's see's not his doctor, but his servant, loyal and entrusted to take care of them. Isn't that neat? It will be more, stay on the "diving board."


    Best regards, sir/madam (if I made a mistake).
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...

Share This Page