Academia phamacist salary question, instructor vs. professor?

Aug 27, 2010
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Academic Administration
Instructors are typically non-tenure track, have not completed a residency (after a Pharm.D. if in the practice department), may not have a Ph.D. or postdoctoral experience and are usually limited to teaching labs. Some places they may teach extra courses.
Depending on the school an instructor may be eligible to become an assistant professor after 5 years and some places instructors may never be eligible to become assistant professors unless they complete the residency, Ph.D., etc

An assistant professor is typically where most PharmDs with residency or PhDs start. After 5 years you are evaluated on your teaching, service and scholarly activity and move on to Associate...etc

I absolutely love my job and would not trade it for the world. There are some people on the forum who dislike (rather hate) academia but I thank the Lord every morning for my job. I absolutely have to report to no one (probably once a year), total autonomy, love learning and reading new stuff, super flexible, get money to do research, can take as much time off if needed for emergencies/children/etc. Having done retail and worked in industry, I can tell you that on a scale of 1-10 (10 being the highest) for how much I like academia, I can say it was around 2 for retail, 7 for industry and 10 for academia. I dont know if it is for everyone though and it might just be my personality, but I would work at my current job for exactly 1/2 the pay.
 
OP
C
Oct 1, 2010
25
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Pre-Pharmacy
Instructors are typically non-tenure track, have not completed a residency (after a Pharm.D. if in the practice department), may not have a Ph.D. or postdoctoral experience and are usually limited to teaching labs. Some places they may teach extra courses.
Depending on the school an instructor may be eligible to become an assistant professor after 5 years and some places instructors may never be eligible to become assistant professors unless they complete the residency, Ph.D., etc

An assistant professor is typically where most PharmDs with residency or PhDs start. After 5 years you are evaluated on your teaching, service and scholarly activity and move on to Associate...etc

I absolutely love my job and would not trade it for the world. There are some people on the forum who dislike (rather hate) academia but I thank the Lord every morning for my job. I absolutely have to report to no one (probably once a year), total autonomy, love learning and reading new stuff, super flexible, get money to do research, can take as much time off if needed for emergencies/children/etc. Having done retail and worked in industry, I can tell you that on a scale of 1-10 (10 being the highest) for how much I like academia, I can say it was around 2 for retail, 7 for industry and 10 for academia. I dont know if it is for everyone though and it might just be my personality, but I would work at my current job for exactly 1/2 the pay.

That is very interesting, thank you for your response.

How many days do you get off per year? Is it the same as a high school teacher? My father teach physics and math at high school and he likes his job quite a bit.

Also, are you saying that it takes a Pharm.D + 1 year residency to start out as an assistant professor?
 

297point1

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Aug 17, 2009
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I was one happy camper when I saw that I am making precisely one standard deviation over the national salary average for my position.

As far as days off goes, I'm on a 12 month appointment, so I don't get summers off like high school teachers do. But I do get 39 days (!) of PTO, including vacation, holidays, floating holidays, and the week of Christmas.

I can't say there's much else I'd rather be doing now.
 
OP
C
Oct 1, 2010
25
0
Status
Pre-Pharmacy
I was one happy camper when I saw that I am making precisely one standard deviation over the national salary average for my position.

As far as days off goes, I'm on a 12 month appointment, so I don't get summers off like high school teachers do. But I do get 39 days (!) of PTO, including vacation, holidays, floating holidays, and the week of Christmas.

I can't say there's much else I'd rather be doing now.

Wow 39 days of paid time-off days? Isn't that way more than what a retail pharmacist would get? Sounds nice
 
Aug 27, 2010
19
0
Status
Academic Administration
I was one happy camper when I saw that I am making precisely one standard deviation over the national salary average for my position.

As far as days off goes, I'm on a 12 month appointment, so I don't get summers off like high school teachers do. But I do get 39 days (!) of PTO, including vacation, holidays, floating holidays, and the week of Christmas.

I can't say there's much else I'd rather be doing now.
Pretty much the same at my school. Actually a few more if I add up all the Christmas, New Year, MLK day, etc. And then the extra sick days and ya it is easy enough to get some work from home days if you really needed even more time off....
 

SomeGuy

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I was one happy camper when I saw that I am making precisely one standard deviation over the national salary average for my position.
If only I could find a source of national average salaries and standard deviations, I could figure out precisely, but not accurately (???) what you make in a year ;)
 

owlegrad

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Mar 19, 2009
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If only I could find a source of national average salaries and standard deviations, I could figure out precisely, but not accurately (???) what you make in a year ;)
Bureau of Labor Statistics. Maybe that was part of the joke though?
 

297point1

Never faster
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Aug 17, 2009
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North Haverbrook, Odgenville, AND Brockway
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Academic Administration
If only I could find a source of national average salaries and standard deviations, I could figure out precisely, but not accurately (???) what you make in a year ;)
The Standard Deviations were listed right below the mean salary in the link on the first post.

Oh, I see...accurate vs. precise. :eyebrow: It's been a while since I've taken statistics.