Slowpoke

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I was wondering if anyone could point me in the right direction for schools known for training excellent academic physicians?

I'd really love to end up doing a mixture of teaching, research, and clinical work.

Where to start looking? Any suggestions?
 

sully677

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I was wondering if anyone could point me in the right direction for schools known for training excellent academic physicians?

I'd really love to end up doing a mixture of teaching, research, and clinical work.

Where to start looking? Any suggestions?
Stanford
 

penguin24

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I think it would matter moreso where you went to residency at. Thus, training at a large academic hospital (such as Stanford as noted above) would open the doors to an academic career as an attending. Sure, going to a research-oriented med school would also help, but IMO not as much as going to a research-oriented hospital for residency.
 

d1ony5u5

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Academia has always been a bit of an elitist field, and will always be. For this reason you'll get the best chances by attending brand name universities and doing well in them/getting yourself published in their research. The pedigree is very important.

Other than that, which speaks more of the idiosyncrasies of the gatekeepers than of the quality of work that can be done, just your drive should be enough. You could go to one of the lower tier schools and thru hard work and dedication, foresight and intelligence, become a phenomenal researcher/academician. It would simply be easier if you were to attend schools like JHU, HMS, P&S, Stanford, UCSF, etc...

Also, I have heard that it helps to shoot for a residency in a large academic program (affiliated with a university), rather than a community based program. Again, not that it is impossible if you attend the community programs, just that it becomes a bit harder...
 

Slowpoke

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I think it would matter moreso where you went to residency at. Thus, training at a large academic hospital (such as Stanford as noted above) would open the doors to an academic career as an attending. Sure, going to a research-oriented med school would also help, but IMO not as much as going to a research-oriented hospital for residency.
Makes sense. Though could you argue that going to a research oriented med school would give you a better chance at a research oriented hospital for residency, assuming scores are comparable.

I guess my underlining question is which medical schools are more research oriented (excluding the obvious top tier ones), ranging from mid to lower tier as those are the ones I have a reasonable chance at.
 

Narmerguy

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Academia has always been a bit of an elitist field, and will always be. For this reason you'll get the best chances by attending brand name universities and doing well in them/getting yourself published in their research. The pedigree is very important.

Other than that, which speaks more of the idiosyncrasies of the gatekeepers than of the quality of work that can be done, just your drive should be enough. You could go to one of the lower tier schools and thru hard work and dedication, foresight and intelligence, become a phenomenal researcher/academician. It would simply be easier if you were to attend schools like JHU, HMS, P&S, Stanford, UCSF, etc...

Also, I have heard that it helps to shoot for a residency in a large academic program (affiliated with a university), rather than a community based program. Again, not that it is impossible if you attend the community programs, just that it becomes a bit harder...
Yup.
 

Slowpoke

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Academia has always been a bit of an elitist field, and will always be. For this reason you'll get the best chances by attending brand name universities and doing well in them/getting yourself published in their research. The pedigree is very important.

Other than that, which speaks more of the idiosyncrasies of the gatekeepers than of the quality of work that can be done, just your drive should be enough. You could go to one of the lower tier schools and thru hard work and dedication, foresight and intelligence, become a phenomenal researcher/academician. It would simply be easier if you were to attend schools like JHU, HMS, P&S, Stanford, UCSF, etc...

Also, I have heard that it helps to shoot for a residency in a large academic program (affiliated with a university), rather than a community based program. Again, not that it is impossible if you attend the community programs, just that it becomes a bit harder...
Thank you, this is great insight. I will surely be applying for a few of the top tiers, but I'm not reassured by any means that I'll get into any of them.
 

penguin24

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Makes sense. Though could you argue that going to a research oriented med school would give you a better chance at a research oriented hospital for residency, assuming scores are comparable.

I guess my underlining question is which medical schools are more research oriented (excluding the obvious top tier ones), ranging from mid to lower tier as those are the ones I have a reasonable chance at.
Yes, you are correct in that statement. Going to a research-oriented med school does give you a better chance of landing a research-oriented residency. I won't argue w/ you there.