ACH and NE

Discussion in 'MCAT Study Question Q&A' started by BloodySurgeon, May 12, 2008.

  1. BloodySurgeon

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    I read two contradictory things and I would like to know ppl's input on it. I remember reading somewhere that if you inhibit the ACE then there will be a lack of depolarization because the presynaptic cleft needs to reuptake the ACH and only one action potential can be done per receptor on the membrane.

    However, in another passage it says.. blocking the reuptake of NE (norepinephrine) into the nerve terminal, leave more NE in the synapse where it can continue to stimulate the receptors on the member. Increasing sympathetic responses.

    Common sense leads me to believe the second over the first, however, this may be a question of difference between ACH vs. NE making both statements correct. Does anyone else know which is right?
     
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  3. physics junkie

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    I read two contradictory things and I would like to know ppl's input on it. I remember reading somewhere that if you inhibit the ACE then there will be a lack of depolarization because the presynaptic cleft needs to reuptake the ACH and only one action potential can be done per receptor on the membrane.

    However, in another passage it says.. blocking the reuptake of NE (norepinephrine) into the nerve terminal, leave more NE in the synapse where it can continue to stimulate the receptors on the member. Increasing sympathetic responses.

    Common sense leads me to believe the second over the first, however, this may be a question of difference between ACH vs. NE making both statements correct. Does anyone else know which is right?

    When NE reuptake is inhibited the synaptic cleft is flooded with NE. The terminal synapse doesn't reuptake AcH. It waits for AcHE to cut it into Choline and Acetyl-CoA and then manufactures it again. If AcH sits in the synapse a normal person's muscles will get continuously excited. The nerve gas "sarin" that was used in tokyo subways a decade ago does exactly this.

    My guess is that the second statement is right. Can't believe that I remember this stuff.
     

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