Pegasus

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Just wondering if I should do this sometime in May before internship, although my program does offer the course during orientation, I will be on a honeymoon the week prior, and so busy with wedding stuff, that I might do better to get certified before hand...how many of you are doing this?

Thanks
 
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beyond all hope

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The ACLS course is not that easy anymore. It used to be much easier several years ago. If you're not familiar with your resuccitation/arrhythmia protocols than you better pay attention during the course.

I agree the ACLS book is the best source.
 

Apollyon

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Ah, hell fire, I must be getting old. When I recert (like last week), I just show up, take the written, tube the head, identify strips, and get the hell pimped out of me on the megacode, and I'm done.

If somebody gets REAL snotty, I ask them why you DON'T routinely shock asystole.
 

southerndoc

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Originally posted by beyond all hope
The ACLS course is not that easy anymore. It used to be much easier several years ago. If you're not familiar with your resuccitation/arrhythmia protocols than you better pay attention during the course.
That's funny. The course pass rate has increased significantly since the early 90's. When I first took ACLS as a medic, it was very difficult. The last few courses I've taken have been really easy compared to the first course. I don't think it's better knowledge either. The instructors don't drill you as much during the megacodes.
 

vtach

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OK As an ACLS instructor, it has become a joke. Since the revisions in 1999-2000 when the testing became a group effort, and the cardiologists EF input, it has been a joke. It was much better when you had no help on Megacode and alot more fun as an instructor. Beyond all hope brings up really what I dislike about ACLS, not knowing what you are doing and thinking that the instructors will teach it. That is not the point. You should basicly know it when you get to the course and the course is the time to practice skills and polish/ask a few questions to clarify different points, but not to teach it to students who haven't even opened a book. I still love it when people come in and have memorized the Tachy protocols and acutually think that out in the field or in the ED you can guesstimate the EF! Or those who don't know a rhythm strip and thought it was going to be taught during the course. Ah the little things that make me chuckle.
 

12R34Y

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Just a lowly M2 here, but as an ACLS instructor i can say that i find the classes that i teach to be quite simple. We basically don't fail anyone. The megacode is essentially a big group effort and people can really slip through the cracks in my opinion. But, i just do what my coordinator tells us to do.

Back in paramedic school the ACLS instructors GRILLED you and it was one-on-one so you HAD to know your stuff.

Not that way anymore as "group adult learning" has taken over.
blah blah blah

later
 

EMRaiden

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I will agree that ACLS has changed a great deal since I first took it in the early 90's... then you actually had to work and study to pass. The last time I took it was on the computer and I was done with the entire class in 1.5 hours. It is entirely too PC... no one "FAILS" ACLS anymore, you are remediated until you achieve course completion.

It is a merit badge (without merit) and I'm glad the hospital system I work for doesn't require me to take it.

EMRaiden
 

jazz

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i took it during orientation -- didn't want to pay for it. thought the program should pay for that.
 

DrQuinn

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To the OP:

I dont' think its necessary to get an extra ACLS course. As an intern, you won't be the only one running a code... there will likely be a resident there with you, and they'll run it. A few months into your internship you'll start to feel comfortable and will be able to run them on your own. First thing to learn as an intern is to just take your own pulse and just see hwo they are run at your hospital.

Unlike me, at my place, I ran two codes my first day in the ED (first class of our EM residency program, no one there to run it for me!). Scary but I leanred quick. Now i LOVE running codes.

Q, DO
 

vtach

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Running a code is like riding a bicycle, you can quickly tell the old medics and critical care nurses who are now M3's, M4's and Interns......Once you learn how, you never forget. I have watched and thought it difficult to learn how to manage a code in the Hospital, usually to many cooks in the kitchen. When learning to make the quick decisions in a code situation you need initial guidance but the upper level residents need to back off. When I was a medic training new medics, the hardest thing to learn was to back off and let the new medic get into his/her own rhythm. There is more than one way to do things, and just to give gentle nudges when appropriate to keep them on the path. Only way to learn is to do.
 
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