jrg0214

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Jul 18, 2016
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Hi everyone! I'm in a unique situation and could use advice.

I just graduated with a BS; I finished everything with an overall GPA of 2.98. I had an upward trend in junior and senior years (3.43 and 3.94 respectively).

I took the MCAT to standardize the competitiveness of my application and potentially set myself up for post-bacc/SMP; I scored a 507.

I am a married 24 year old living in CA and would rather not drag my family across the country unless I can get the biggest return for my time and financial investment.

Frustratingly, I feel like I am spending a lot of time trying to distance myself from my academic past, despite having bettered myself and my study habits. In my senior year, I completed 18 unit semesters while working 25-30 hours a week to financially provide for my family.

Folks, what would be the best way to convince medical schools that I can handle the academic rigor? What programs should I pursue or look into?

Thanks for reading up until this point!


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jrg0214

2+ Year Member
Jul 18, 2016
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Pre-Medical
What is your overall sGPA?
sGPA 2.83.

It's abysmal, obviously; however, all of the low grades came from a number of years ago. Senior year sGPA = 4.0 w/ 19 BCPM unit hours (Cell/Molecular Biology, Organic chemistry, Microbiology, Bioethics, Research)
 

esob

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The "upward trend" in your Jr/Sr years will be viewed as less of an upward trend and more of a "everyone knows the majority of 3k and 4k level classes are mostly fluff by this point in your career". The only exception is if you were something like a Chem major doing Quant/Pchem etc or engineering. Add 10 points to your MCAT and apply to DO schools, receive degree, call yourself a doctor, case closed.
 
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Figure out how many classes you need to get your sGPA up to =>3.00. If you complete a 1 year post-bac (and earn straight A's) and apply early and broadly to DO schools during the 2018/2019 cycle, then you have a decent shot.
 

12glaucoma34

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sGPA 2.83.

It's abysmal, obviously; however, all of the low grades came from a number of years ago. Senior year sGPA = 4.0 w/ 19 BCPM unit hours (Cell/Molecular Biology, Organic chemistry, Microbiology, Bioethics, Research)
That is a HUGE problem. It is one thing to say my cGPA is 2.7 and my sGPA is 3.4, but that GPA is going to require a lot of work to get above 3.0. That is where the MCAT can assist, you need to slaughter that test in addition to getting nothing but As from now on.
 

Ad2b

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The best way to prove to medical schools that you can handle the rigor is take classes and get A's and B's + solid MCAT score.

As someone who has sat in a similar situation but gave myself time (truthfully, that gift of time was NOT my choice), my GPA now is 30 years older than my GPA that is similar to yours.

I'm not saying you need to take a 30 year break but I am suggesting to give yourself a few years space between "now" and when you can "prove" yourself.
 
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jrg0214

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Jul 18, 2016
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Bumping my own post for additional information.

Thanks for taking the time to reply, all. It's appreciated.

So, here's the rub. I am going into my local CC for an 18 unit all-science semester in an attempt to raise that sGPA. I cannot attend a university due to financial constraints.

The responses here seem to infer that my 507 MCAT truly is too low.

Despite adding post-bacc coursework at a high GPA (let's assume for a moment that will take place), is the MCAT truly that low to not get a single bite (DO/"low yield")?

I'm looking at @En3rgy 's post. 18 additional units of BCMP @ 4.0 will raise the sGPA to 3.08. This is sufficient to prevent pre-screening, but senior year @ 3.9 and one semester of post-bacc may be insufficient to convince schools I'm reformed. What do you think? On the right track?
 
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jrg0214

2+ Year Member
Jul 18, 2016
4
1
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Pre-Medical
The best way to prove to medical schools that you can handle the rigor is take classes and get A's and B's + solid MCAT score.

As someone who has sat in a similar situation but gave myself time (truthfully, that gift of time was NOT my choice), my GPA now is 30 years older than my GPA that is similar to yours.

I'm not saying you need to take a 30 year break but I am suggesting to give yourself a few years space between "now" and when you can "prove" yourself.
I'm happy to take the time as needed, but I also want to be continually doing what I can to get closer to pursuing my calling. I think doing some preliminary transcript repair is helpful. If anything, it helps instill confidence in myself for success.
 
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workaholic181

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I'm happy to take the time as needed, but I also want to be continually doing what I can to get closer to pursuing my calling. I think doing some preliminary transcript repair is helpful. If anything, it helps instill confidence in myself for success.
A 507 is fine for DO in general but given the rest of your application at this point wouldn't make you competitive.

If I were you OP I would boost my GPA to over 3.0 by taking CC classes, then apply to SMPs. Your MCAT is good for SMP programs. Perform well in one of those and you could get into medical school.

But be advise there is little to no room for error for you going forward, and this will take several years and a lot of money just to get into med school someday down the line. You can do it but it will be really taxing so you gotta ask yourself if this is what you want.