bluestreaks

5+ Year Member
Jun 11, 2012
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I did 21 interviews, roughly the "top 25" schools if you listen to US News. Since I gained a lot of experience, figured out what works, and had quite a bit of success (with interviews themselves, not just decisions), I thought I would share what I learned to all of you who want to prepare for interviews.

The Key: Many applicants view interviews the wrong way, in my opinion. To me, it was my time to take control of the conversation and put out exactly the impression that I wanted them to get. You have the spotlight and power to present yourself and your achievements/activities in whatever light you choose. Your confidence and charisma are your greatest assets, and you can use them to make almost anything seem incredible. You shouldn't be scared - you should be excited, since this is one of the few times you really get to control this process!

Disclaimer: these aren't the only ways to be successful in interviews. You can disagree, and if you do, post! Many things depend on your personality and how you naturally talk to people. Charmers have the advantage, but prep always helps level the playing field!



BEFORE THE INTERVIEW:

1. Reread your application
This includes personal statement, secondaries, and activities section. You will be asked about your apps, and you want to be fluent in them, otherwise, it will sound like you made things up. Also, try to remember one specific and meaningful anecdote from each experience that expresses its significance. It's always better to use specific examples rather than general statements to show what you did.

2. Learn about the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
UPDATE - some of this may be outdated now. In any case, learn about the current state of healthcare in the US and relevant current issues.
About half of my schools asked about this. Nothing too difficult! Usually just, "What your thoughts?" or "What do you think will happen?" I recommend tackling this by learning what they key points are - what the overall goal was, what some key changes are (eg no lifetime caps, you can remain on your parents' insurance longer, patients with preexisting conditions can't be turned away), and problems with it. It's good to show that you acknowledge the good and the bad, and then state your overall opinion. I basically said I support it and its intentions, but I worry about how it will play out with respect to reimbursements, financially for the US, and for small businesses. It's ok to say "I don't know what will happen." I did every time (after showing I knew about it), every single time, my interview was very pleased and said, "That's a great and honest answer, because I don't know either!" Several applicants have told me they didn't receive this question often. But if you do, and you don't have a good answer, it's very difficult to fumble your way through, and you can't afford that. Interviews who ask this tend to be ones on the actual admissions committee in my experience, rather than doctors who volunteered to interview.

3. Study the school you're doing to be interviewing at
You will usually get asked "Why our school?" Unless it's a top 5. Even then, you still want to convince them that you fit their school in particular if you want to get in. This means going through the MSAR and their website. I think the most helpful thing is staying with a student host before your interview, and asking them. Or PM students on SDN, asking what the school is REALLY about. I made a Word document outline that I would fill out for each school. Here's what I would makes sure fill in: Class size, curriculum (integrated or normal then abnormal? traditional 2 year basic sciences, or compressed basic sciences?), grading system, clinical exposure, student organizations/interest groups you'd like, about the city itself, programs you'd like to do, and any unique or notable aspects about the school. Use a few basic bullet points to remember what you want to touch on; I used curriculum, student life, location/other as my guide.

4. Practice out loud
Below, I will write out common questions. At least practice the first three in front of a mirror or recording yourself. Then do it with another person. This is important though - you'll probably find that it's awkward doing the "about me" speech, and difficult not to ramble. In real life, you won't be that self conscious during the interview because it will be a fun conversation. You likely won't even feel like you're giving a rehearsed speech and you'll be surprised that you speak much more comfortably. So I would recommend that for the big question topics, you organize your thoughts into about 5 bullet points each. For example, though I practiced "about me" out loud, I really only went into the interview with 5 bullets in mind that I wanted to cover: family background, academic journey, pre-med experiences, leadership, and hobbies. That way, you have a road map to refer to, and you don't forget to leave something important out.

5. Try on your clothes
Do it. Slim suits are sexy IMO.

6. Handshake
Don't offer your fingers. Confident handshakes. I've gotten compliments on them during interviews, and you want to get off on the right foot. Insert a joke about weak handshakes and you've broken the ice and already shown you're a fun person.

7. Don't stress over this the night before. Nothing is more valuable than being relaxed and confident.



GENERAL INTERVIEW ADVICE

1. Smile!
This is so important. You may be dying inside, but smile. This is your chance to show them things besides your scores, grades, and research. My advice? Separate yourself from the pack by showing that you're a real, genuine, and likable person. They'll want you. There are so many people that are stiff, or who look like research robots, that this will give you an edge. If you are extremely nervous, then take control by smiling and saying, "Hey I have to be honest, I get pretty nervous in formal interviews, so sorry if I stutter every now and then!" They will probably smile, appreciate your honesty, and try to make you more comfortable. They're nice people!

2. Balance between confidence and arrogance
You don't want to sound self-depreciating, but you don't want to sound like you're full of yourself. They won't pick you for their class. Being confident goes with smiling, speaking in an appropriate volume, maintaining eye contact, and even showing excitement and enthusiasm when discussing yourself and things you've done.

3. Read your interviewer
Some have been a little more serious (though still nice!), so for those, I would talk more about accomplishments and maybe research. The vast majority have been chill as ____, so I would never hesitate to joke around or go off on entertaining short tangents. I'm not saying you should do only this, but believe me, if you can handle the humor appropriately, they will absolutely love you and you will stand out. Essentially, aren't those the two things you want? Be very careful with humor, since you have to make sure your interviewer is receptive to it. Don't treat student interviewers as "more chill" by default, since you should take them just as seriously. Some student interviewers are more intense than faculty since they feel more pressure to take on a professional role. But my best interviews have been filled with jokes and funny stories. I even compared iPhone apps for 20 minutes and played games during an interview at Hahhhverrrdd. Just make sure you leave time to get the important points across.

4. Ensure you get your whole picture in
Sometimes, they won't ask you the questions you wanted to answer. If you're nearing the end of your interview block, and you really want to discuss your music background, world travels, or research experience, then be direct! Say "Actually, there was one more thing I'd like to bring up that I think has been pretty important - do we have a few minutes left?" Don't be shy! It's your interview.

5. Prepare questions for them - show off more!
Almost all interviewers have asked me if I have questions. Even if you don't, you should come in with some and pretend you do. Here's the trick - you can use questions to your advantage by asking questions that continue to make you look like an appealing applicant. For example, "I know that there's the Clinical Foundations course that spans the curriculum, but how are things like values, compassion, and professionalism really integrated into the curriculum? These are issues are really important to me, and I want to see how much I'll get exposed to them during med school." You can use your tone to make it sound not "suck up-y" It shows that you researched their curriculum and that you also have an appreciation of things that are less tangible, but very important. The beauty is that they will proceed to tell you how their school offers just what you're looking for and how their program is a good fit for your goals and needs. You can use questions like these to show more about yourself, and to get them to convince themselves you belong there. Need more questions? I often asked about camaraderie among students, how accessible faculty were for research and academic help, aaaaand how students new to city can identify local community needs and how to start a program to address them. See what I did there? But yes, ask your own questions too! I found I usually didn't have any after doing my research.

6. Don't forget the touchy-feely side of medicine
Many physicians (and patients) are complaining that the quality of personal care has gone down (which isn't always the doctor's fault - bureaucracy). I always made a point to include that I was well aware of the value of being a human that others could connect with, which interviewers loved (I heard them say, "You really hit the nail on the head" a lot). This can help set you apart from applicants who focus on research and medical education only. If you have experience working with others intimately, or even things like suicide hotlines, don't forget to bring them up. Let them know that you can learn all the science, but that you won't let go of that compassion in you. You can mention how many health problems are really related to other issues in a person's life, that may have to do with family, work, or emotion.



COMMON INTERVIEW QUESTIONS

1. Tell me about yourself
You should have prepared for this! Like I said, have your key bullets/road map ready. Try to keep it around 5 minutes too. This question usually comes up on closed file interviews (where they don't look at your file beforehand). You may want to cover a bit of question 2 (below) if you have time, since it may not get asked separately. I think it's always best to include things beyond the typical premed experiences. Talk about your cultural background, travels, cool hobbies, non-medically related endeavors, odd jobs... They've always loved those things most. Mention the relevant premed stuff too, but don't forget about what I mentioned in the previous sentence. Stand out as a person, not a premed machine!

2. How did you decide on medicine?
This goes hand-in-hand with the first question. Spend time before you go in, and try to think of a unifying thread that makes your whole story make sense! I did somethings that weren't medically related at all, but I said, "...and that's how I realized I didn't want to do business!" You didn't have to know you wanted to be premed from the age of 5. I didn't. Highlight your ups and downs in getting there, so make it honest and convincing. Mention your clinical work though! You have to have been exposed to the job you want to do, at least a little!

3. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
See number 2 in "BEFORE THE INTERVIEW", above. They probably just want to see that you keep up with what's going on and that you developed your own opinion. You poli-sci and econ majors can probably offer additional insight.

4. Biggest strengths and weaknesses
Try not to be cliche! Thinking of unique things... like you respond well to criticism. If you do say something somewhat cliche, then come prepared with a very short anecdote or example that highlights how exceptionally true that strength is for you, in particular. It's always good to demonstrate through examples in interviews, but keep them short, since they often ask for three strengths. Now for weakness - don't use the cliche "I'm a perfectionist" or "I take on too many responsibilities." Be honest, and pick something that's true! Show you're humble. Don't pick something absolutely awful, but something they'll believe. I said "I get frustrated very easily and can be very stubborn at letting things go." You can use your tone to your advantage here to come across as honest, but light-hearted, and smile!

5. Why our school?
See number 3 in "BEFORE THE INTERVIEW".

6. Discuss a time where you failed at something
Make this very honest, and use it to show that you can admit failure and own up to things. Being able to acknowledge your mistakes shows a lot about you, and you can really let them see what kind of person you are with this question. I'd advise that you explain what happened, own up to everything, then show how you're learned from it and made yourself a better person. Use your genuine smile. Smiles go a long way!

7. Why did you decide to attend ________ school for undergrad? (or grad)
I wouldn't stress about this one. It may be nice to explain that you had a goal in mind, and that the location of your school offered the environment or programs you wanted to reach them. You may use this to come across as someone who takes initiative and does things with a sense of purpose. You can tie this into why you chose to apply to their school, if you can relate your motives.

8. Biggest issues in healthcare/medicine and how would you address it?
You may want to do some research and have one or two things prepared. Use this to demonstrate your understanding of current issues, and your ability to identify solutions. For example, I discussed preventative care, and tried to include things like creating more recreation centers and safer parks for children to have places to get physical activity, especially in poorer areas and inner cities, on top of my other solution ideas.

9. Why should we accept you/what makes you unique?
In a way, your answers to these two different questions are very similar. Many schools have explained that they want "one of each type of person". So if they already accepted the saxophone playing lacrosse player, they won't take another, even if he/she has higher stats. You want to highlight all the things that make you stand out, to convince them that you can add something to their student body that nobody else can offer. Show how what you bring will enhance the lives of your future peers. They probably have seen that you can handle their curriculum academically, which is why they interviewed you. This may also be a good time to bring up any family you have in the area. If you did your research, and they have a huge talent show each semester that's a big part of student life, show how your hobby would be great for it! Do they have a 5k that many students do? That's great, because you're an active runner! Are they big on rural care? Then show how your experiences are relevant, highlighting that they offer exactly what you need. FIT is the key word. You want to fit their school, but also stand out. Talk to students through the host program, SDN, and the interview day itself, as they walk around, to see what they're like. Duke, for example, seemed to me to be very big on work hard/play hard. They seemed to be very into keeping physically active as well as studying.

10. What do you do for fun?
Favorite question. Almost always got asked this. I've been very aggressive about using answers to kind of make yourself look good, but for this one, I think it's best to just say what you do and show a ton of enthusiasm. Nothing has to be medically related, and I think it's better if it isn't. It's great to mention specific clubs or events you participated in that are related to your activity. If you play guitar, don't say you just play. Tell them about how you found some friends to jam with, and how you played at that bar one night! Smile a lot and get really into it. People are attracted to other people who look like they're having fun. They will like you, and also recognize that you have balance in your life and ways of dealing with stress.

Other less common questions:

11. Biggest influences
They may specify that it has to be an influence to do medicine, but otherwise, you can name anyone if you have a good reason. I even said Jimi Hendrix once, since I interviewed with a rock fanatic, and I do idolize Hendrix.

12. How would a friend describe you? (in three words?)
Again, try to stay away from generic, and don't make them too gloat-y. It's good to offer a mix of impressive, fun, and unique adjectives.

13. If you could cure a disease, what would it be and why?
Come in with this prepared already. Psychological diseases count too!

14. Proudest/happiest moment?
I really can't help you with this.

15. Time you had to use teamwork
Doesn't have to be work related. I often used music or sports, depending on my interviewer, just to give you ideas.

16. Time you had to work through a disagreement
This is a perfect time to show that you can admit when somebody may have a better idea or that you were wrong. Also, demonstrate that you know how to listen and compromise. Many applicants think they need to be the ones who are right. Set yourself apart.

17. Time you had to go against orders
Be very careful with this. Use this to demonstrate that you think on your own, and that you went against the grain because you truly thought it was the right thing to do. Don't pick a time when you disobeyed orders for the wrong reasons, unless you really can explain how you were wrong, and learned from it. So you could take this in two different ways.

18. Books you've recently read
Before you decide on your book, think of how awkward it may sound to explain certain stories to someone who has never heard them before. Maybe a manga isn't the best idea.




MULTIPLE MINI INTERVIEWS (MMI)

1. No right answer
These are often designed so that there is not a clear correct answer, obviously. I highly recommend that before you commit to an opinion, you tell your interview that you want to explore both sides of the coin first. Then come up with your answer. More important than having an answer is being able to identify why these are such tricky situations and why both sides have merit. This will impress them more than an instant opinion.

2. Teamwork activity
If you have a group activity, one of their goals is to evaluate how well you communicate. You should ask your partner(s) often if they are following you, and if what you're doing is working for them. Check that you are on the same page. Use analogies when appropriate to show that you're able to present a task in different ways to help another person learn. It's more important to communicate well and use teamwork than to finish the tasks and look like a dictator. I've had aggressive people try to stand out and they end up looking like fools. No school wants a student like that.

3. I'm stuck
If you get stuck with a difficult situational question, you can always say that you would refer to your supervisors and higher-up professionals for advice. You don't have to have the right answer in these (honestly). As a doctor, you will not always know the answer and will often ask supervisors about what to do. Show that you know these resources are available and that you will take advantage of them when you need them. Knowing when to ask a questions is important, and better than making a decision without being fully informed.

4. Don't forget the touchy-feely
If you have a question where you need to explore some kind of problem a patient or student is having, don't just look at physical symptoms. Always acknowledge that there may be family, cultural, emotional, sexual, or religious, issues that factor into the problem they're having. You will have to work with many types of people, so impress them with the fact that you're aware of these issues and how they may have physical manifestations. Not everything is treated by a pill!

5. Don't expect a resolution
You may have to role-play and try to resolve a problematic situation. Some schools even use actors. Don't get frustrated or panicky if you're not able to provide a resolution during the given time. Even if you're doing great, they will continue to add layers of complexity and resist your suggestions, probably because they want to keep you in the fire for the full 8-10 minutes to see how you handle it. Just keep trying and keep your cool, because they may never tell you, "Ok, you fixed it. Thanks!"

6. Debate station
Not all MMI schools do this. You will probably be assigned a side, and you have to defend it until they call time, even if you don't agree with it. Just be sure that you don't falter - keep defending your side! If they offer a debriefing period, then you can be honest about your actual views and tell them that your opponent raised great points.




AFTER THE INTERVIEW

1. Ask if you can have their email to ask questions and send a thank you note.

2. Smile when you say goodbye. I swear to god, it's effective.

3. Send a thank you note, either in email or an actual letter. I always did email. Do this within about three days, before they forget you or interview a bunch of other people! Also, do it soon, since who knows, you may catch them before they submit their evaluation of you.

4. (optional) Don't check SDN's school specific page nonstop because you will stress out.




WHAT IMPRESSED INTERVIEWERS?

1. Easy-going, amicable attitude
2. Awareness of how culture, emotion, religion, sexuality, etc. can affect health
3. Enthusiasm when I talked about what I like
4. Admitting faults honestly
5. Knowledge about their school
6. Relating each experience back to how it gave me skills relevant to being a doctor
7. My hobbies and travels




FINAL NOTES

Yes, smiling is very important. Basically, you have complete power during your interviews to make even the most trivial experiences sound like the most important things in the world, and absolutely relevant to your decision to pursue medicine. If you're lacking a little in one field, (like I could have done more clinical), you can use the interview to really embellish your experience. My advice, again, is that you illustrate your points with short examples and anecdotes. Specifics! Finally, you many notice that I often said to be honest with mistakes you made and owning up to them. Interviewers have loved it when I've been honest about things and have shown that I can acknowledge when I screw up and that I learn from mistakes. You will look mature if you handle those well.

Practicing helps, but I think it's best to preserve a set of bullet points for the big questions, to act as a road map. Figure out what makes your interviewer tick, and use your smile, charisma, and enthusiasm regarding your life stories to make them fall in love with you. I've had interviewers tell me on the spot that they will ensure I'm in, and that they really hope I'll pick their school. It's not worth being nervous, because honestly, the interviews themselves are always the most enjoyable and fun part of the day, in my opinion.



Feel free to contact me with questions, random inquiries, or whatever!
 
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Jan 31, 2012
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Sup. Yes I did that many interviews, to roughly most of the "top 30" schools. Don't ask how much it cost, don't even want to talk about it.

I was wondering what you all thought if I made a detailed thread about my interview experiences, the most common questions, how to prepare, what to expect, (including MMI), and what kind of answers seem to get glowing responses during interviews. I've had success and kind of gotten it down to a science. And yes, I KNOW there isn't one way to act or answer questions, before some people begin shooting me down.

I gained a lot of experience and learned what works (at least for me), and I'd just like to pass it on for those who care enough to lurk on SDN. I'd like to hear what you all think!
20 interviews?! Dang dude, you must have been to almost half the states already! Anyways, I'd love a thread like that.
 

IslandStyle808

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Sup. Yes I did that many interviews, to roughly most of the "top 30" schools. Don't ask how much it cost, don't even want to talk about it.

I was wondering what you all thought if I made a detailed thread about my interview experiences, the most common questions, how to prepare, what to expect, (including MMI), and what kind of answers seem to get glowing responses during interviews. I've had success and kind of gotten it down to a science. And yes, I KNOW there isn't one way to act or answer questions, before some people begin shooting me down.

I gained a lot of experience and learned what works (at least for me), and I'd just like to pass it on for those who care enough to lurk on SDN. I'd like to hear what you all think!
Definitely for it! :thumbup::thumbup:
 

sector9

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People are always looking for interview advice. I say go for it!
 
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bluestreaks

bluestreaks

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20 interviews?! Dang dude, you must have been to almost half the states already! Anyways, I'd love a thread like that.
Yep, it was quite the journey! Thanks for the feedback, I didn't think people would actually care much. Should I make it a separate thread in place of this one, or do it here? Thanks for the support!
 

Aerus

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I'd definitely read it!
 

LizzyM

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Don't forget to add to the Interivew Feedback (link at the top of every page on the forum) as this is most helpful next year to people who are interviewing.
 

Marika11

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I would suggest writing it and submitting it to SDN to potentially get it published as an article. If you're not sure how to go about doing that, PM me.

(sent from my phone)
This is a good idea. I'd read it.
 
Oct 5, 2012
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I was wondering what you all thought if I made a detailed thread about my interview experiences, the most common questions, how to prepare, what to expect, (including MMI), and what kind of answers seem to get glowing responses during interviews. I've had success and kind of gotten it down to a science. And yes, I KNOW there isn't one way to act or answer questions, before some people begin shooting me down.

Yes, would love to read that!
 

Narmerguy

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Don't forget to add to the Interivew Feedback (link at the top of every page on the forum) as this is most helpful next year to people who are interviewing.
+1 :thumbup:
 

yehhhboiii

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It would definitely be nice if you posted some of that information in the interview feedback section. The answers that people posted helped a lot, especially when interviewers threw questions at me that I wouldn't have anticipated otherwise.
 
Jan 8, 2013
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FOR THE SAKE OF HUMANITY JUST TELL US ALREADY!!!!!!! Lol I would love to hear about your experiences and advice! Btw how the hell did you get 20 interviews!?!?!? Either your parents must be well known for making school donations, or you had one hell of an MCAT!
 

NickNaylor

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FOR THE SAKE OF HUMANITY JUST TELL US ALREADY!!!!!!! Lol I would love to hear about your experiences and advice! Btw how the hell did you get 20 interviews!?!?!? Either your parents must be well known for making school donations, or you had one hell of an MCAT!
Lol, these are not the only methods by which you get a lot of interviews.

Additionally, relevant info people asking for details might want to know about the OP is your stats, the total number of schools you applied to, and the decisions you received or have received already as a proportion of your interviews.

(sent from my phone)
 

TheKDizzle

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Sup. Yes I did that many interviews, to roughly most of the "top 30" schools. Don't ask how much it cost, don't even want to talk about it.

I was wondering what you all thought if I made a detailed thread about my interview experiences, the most common questions, how to prepare, what to expect, (including MMI), and what kind of answers seem to get glowing responses during interviews. I've had success and kind of gotten it down to a science. And yes, I KNOW there isn't one way to act or answer questions, before some people begin shooting me down.

I gained a lot of experience and learned what works (at least for me), and I'd just like to pass it on for those who care enough to lurk on SDN. I'd like to hear what you all think!
Definitely go for it! I was thinking about doing something similar, but then I realized my senior-year self wasn't gonna let it happen. I wonder if I ran into you anywhere along the way.
 

MedPR

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Sticky if it's legit.

Sent from my SGH-T999 using SDN Mobile
 
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bluestreaks

bluestreaks

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Presuming that many of your interviews resulted with acceptances!
Yes haha. No my parents didn't make any school donations either.

How about this - I'll try to submit an article. That's not the same as a sticky is it? I asked NickNaylor for help since he offered. And then, if people want, we can do a Q&A in a separate thread or even this one?

And if any of you interviewed this season... I probably saw you somewhere lol.
 
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LizzyM

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It would really help, too, if you completed an MDapplicant thing and link that to your SDN screen name.
 
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MedPR

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Yes haha. No my parents didn't make any school donations either.

How about this - I'll try to submit an article. That's not the same as a sticky is it? I asked NickNaylor for help since he offered. And then, if people want, we can do a Q&A in a separate thread or even this one?

And if any of you interviewed this season... I probably saw you somewhere lol. For those curious, I gotten into about half so far, just waiting on a few more, withdrew from the others.
Sounds like a good idea. I interviewed at 9 MD schools but none were top 30 so we probably didn't cross paths :(

Sent from my SGH-T999 using SDN Mobile
 
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bluestreaks

bluestreaks

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It would really help, too, if you completed an MDapplicant thing and link that too your SDN screen name.
I know, but I'm sorry - that makes my personal info a little too accessible, and with that many puzzle pieces available, people I know could piece together who I am. I was going to do general interview advice. LizzyM, you were thinking I should do it place by place? I'll tell anybody specifics if they PM me though!

And @MedPR, I've always wanted to meet somebody with that many posts on SDN haha.
 

NickNaylor

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I know, but I'm sorry - that makes my personal info a little too accessible, and with that many puzzle pieces available, people I know could piece together who I am. I was going to do general interview advice. LizzyM, you were thinking I should do it place by place? I'll tell anybody specifics if they PM me though!

And @MedPR, I've always wanted to meet somebody with that many posts on SDN haha.
If you don't want your account linked to your username, you can still create a MDApps anonymously. It really helps the community when detailed and fully completed MDApps are available to browse - connected with a SDN username or no.
 
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bluestreaks

bluestreaks

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Ok, I'll get to that. For now, I'm drafting the article. I welcome anybody's input too!
 

TwinsFan

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Stats and a review of reasons you felt your app was strong vs. any feedback your interviewers gave you on why your app was strong. Also a decent list of ECs or other key parts of your app.

Congrats on the interviews/acceptances BTW!
 

LizzyM

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I know, but I'm sorry - that makes my personal info a little too accessible, and with that many puzzle pieces available, people I know could piece together who I am. I was going to do general interview advice. LizzyM, you were thinking I should do it place by place? I'll tell anybody specifics if they PM me though!

And @MedPR, I've always wanted to meet somebody with that many posts on SDN haha.
Well, the Interview feedback is the place to tell people about each place separately. It makes sense to do it that way as interviews are different lengths at different places, open or closed file, with a faculty member or a student, etc, etc.

You could always fill out the mdapplicant info after you matriculate so that your personal info is a moot point... (if anyone could identify you from your undergrad instituition, etc.)
 

sinombre

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I know, but I'm sorry - that makes my personal info a little too accessible, and with that many puzzle pieces available, people I know could piece together who I am. I was going to do general interview advice. LizzyM, you were thinking I should do it place by place? I'll tell anybody specifics if they PM me though!

And @MedPR, I've always wanted to meet somebody with that many posts on SDN haha.
Don't you think people you know might figure out who you are solely because you've revealed that you've interviewed at more than 20 (top) schools? There aren't that many applicants who have been as successful as you have.
 
OP
bluestreaks

bluestreaks

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Don't you think people you know might figure out who you are solely because you've revealed that you've interviewed at more than 20 (top) schools? There aren't that many applicants who have been as successful as you have.
lol. If only I was withoutaname like you

@LizzyM yes I'll make my MDapps after I decide on a school, good idea.
 

Narmerguy

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If you don't want your account linked to your username, you can still create a MDApps anonymously. It really helps the community when detailed and fully completed MDApps are available to browse - connected with a SDN username or no.
Agreed. The detailed ones are really the most useful, it's hard for people to learn much when the information is vague ("MCAT between 30-35", "Some Research", etc).
 

GorillaPanic

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50% acceptance rate so far is pretty good. How many you waiting to hear from still? Waitlist?
 
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bluestreaks

bluestreaks

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50% acceptance rate so far is pretty good. How many you waiting to hear from still? Waitlist?
It's been above 50%... only about half have responded with decisions, since many are nonrolling. I withdrew from others before they could give decisions. Just so you know this isn't advice from someone who did lots of interviews and failed most.

I'm almost done with it. Should I post it here for feedback first? Or just a new one? I will try to make into an article, but for now, I'd like to get it out there for you all to see and offer feed back.
 
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TheKDizzle

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I know, but I'm sorry - that makes my personal info a little too accessible, and with that many puzzle pieces available, people I know could piece together who I am. I was going to do general interview advice. LizzyM, you were thinking I should do it place by place? I'll tell anybody specifics if they PM me though!

And @MedPR, I've always wanted to meet somebody with that many posts on SDN haha.
Who are these people?! :laugh:
 
OP
bluestreaks

bluestreaks

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Ok here's the first draft. I will probably elaborate more and add things, but I wanted to get most of my thoughts down. Give me your feedback if you want to. I'm going to get some exercise, but I'll be back in a few hours. Thanks! :)


Edit - just see my original post for it now
 
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NickNaylor

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Good post. Basically act normal (control your weirdness), be thoughtful, and use common sense. And smile.
It's pretty surprising how many people fail to do one or more of these very baisc things. I don't think you're even oversimplifying the process. It really is that simple.
 

MilkIsGood

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Nice writeup. I went on 18 interviews myself. In hindsight, I wish I didnt but most of my interviews were before Oct 15, and I didnt want to cancel any interviews without an acceptance in hand. I still cringe at how much it cost, even with using free airline miles and my undergrad scholarship paying for some expenses too.
 

Tots

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Interesting. Thanks :thumbup: BTW I was only asked about healthcare reform once out of 19 interviews....:laugh: