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Advice from Prof for Applicants to PhD Programs

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by DrClinPsyAdvice, Jan 22, 2008.

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  1. ducle7

    ducle7 Junior Member 7+ Year Member

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    Hello Dr. ClinPsy,
    Thanks for the great advice so far! Here are three more ques:
    1. How much does it matter to be in a prog with a child track vs. gen track for a person that's interested primarily in child clinical psych. (also, if the gen track offers a TON of child clinical experience-does this difference matter?)

    2. Some schools really talk about giving their grad students teaching experience--by way of courses on teaching as well as allowing grad students to be the instructor of record. How valuable is this really when applying to faculty positions after graduation.

    3. How much does teaching experience in general (such as SAT classes and undergrad TAing count) for future faculty positions?
     
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  3. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    So many factors go into the length of time that it can take to hear about offers following the interview. In some cases, it can be quick, but other schools may require approval at many levels before they can say anything.

    Three weeks sounds like a good amount of time to wait before sending a quick note. Perhaps you can just say that you are writing to check in, restate your enthusiasm for the program, and state that you understand that the process may require many steps on their end. That way, it doesn't seem like you are being pushy, but you are reminding them that you are out there and still interested. In many cases, you may get a nice email back with a brief update on where things stand.
     
  4. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    Being socially inappropriate.
    Being rude to students or staff.
    Arrogance.
    Not being informed about the mentor's research (at least a little!).
    Behaving inappropriately during the student parties (no hooking up or getting drunk!).
    Not having any questions about the program.
     
  5. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    I have seen personal disclosure in a personal statement work very well once, and fail miserably many dozens of times. The one time that it worked was a beautifully written essay in which the person was able to use their experience to develop informed hypotheses, critique the literature from a scientific perspective and generate novel observations. The disclosure offered a nice foray into the statement, but did not dominate the essay.

    With this once exception, it usually comes off terribly, and immediately raises questions about the motivations for pursuing grad school work.

    That is not to say that someone with a past history of symptoms cannot become an excellent researcher and clinician. In fact, many of the field's greatest contributors are known to be conducting "Me-search" on their own ailments.

    I would suggest thinking carefully about your true motivations for grad school and your career. If your past experiences served as a motivator to explore psychology, and you have since discovered a field and scientific discipline that you now enjoy for a variety of other reasons, then this may be the right path for you, and perhaps you can emphasize these other reasons in an essay.

    If you feel that the interests in science and methods are somewhat of a smokescreen for your true passion, then think about what would be the best program for you. Perhaps something more clinically focused or advocacy focused with help you feel like you were pursuing your passion without having to distort it for admission.
     
  6. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    Hard to say without all of the details, but if you present your ideas in a way that expresses your interest in the work, your knowledge of the field, and your dedication to science, it is hard to imagine that this would go wrong. As you mention, it will be important to offer the appropriate respect for the theory that is espoused in the paper, and your deference to your advisor. But perhaps if you bring it up as something that 'got you thinking,' rather than in any sort of antagonistic, contrary way, it would seem like nice fodder for an intellectual debate/discussion. And that can make for a very fun interview!
     
  7. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    1. Great question. In fact, I think that if you go to the APA Society of Clinical Child Psychology webpage (Division 53) Clinical Child Grad School Directory, there are some FAQs with this one in it. A child track means that there are courses, pracs, and an overall climate of child work. Sometimes a child track also has a national reputation for child work. So these are pros. But great child experience can also be obtained from a few great advisors in a general program. So, there's no definite right or wrong answer, but it is important for you to be an educated consumer.

    2. TA experience won't help you get a job, but teaching experience most certainly will (especially at a liberal arts college). Even at a Research Institution, some teaching experience will be important, and you will be very glad to have some course preps under your belt before you begin the publish, perish track! It saves you tons of time that you can dedicate to research instead!

    3. I am not sure I fully understand the question, but if you mean non university teaching, then I would say that this will not count very much for a future faculty question. But it can help you develop your skills and comfort level in front of the classroom, and that can be invaluable!
     
  8. Ilovecows

    Ilovecows 2+ Year Member

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    Hi Dr. ClinPsyAdvice,


    I'm not sure if you'll be able to make sense of my question, but I tried to word it as best as I could...

    The school I attend (Canadian) calculates ones Cummulative GPA using sessional scores such that whether one takes 1 course in a semester and gets a 4.0 vs. takes 3 courses in a semester and gets a semester score of 4.0 , it counts equally into their CGPA calculation.


    So in effect, one could raise one's GPA quite a bit by taking one additional course and doing quite well.

    So, my question I guess then is: would professors be aware of this when looking at my transcript? I have taken a full course load every single semester. But if I take one course in the summer semester, and this one course raises my GPA quite a bit, would they even be aware that is was this one course that helped drive my GPA up? And if they were so aware,would they care?

    Would my 3.92 --> 3.97 (or what have you) be treated the same way as someone who had a 3.97 from their full courseload?

    And also, this applies to meeting the average GPA to some certain schools.Take for instance a school say that has a 3.7 average GPA of entering grad students.
    So, someone who has a 3.7 average after 4 years of undergrad taking full courses vs. someone who had a 3.6 GPA after 4 years of undergrad taking full courses and then took one course in the next semester and raised it to a 3.7. Would they be evaluated equally? Would their GPAs be equivilant in the professors eyes just because they are equivilant on the transcript?


    Thanks for answering, it's really nice of you to do this. Your school/students are lucky to have a mentor such as yourself.
     
  9. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    Wow - lots of details to figure out on this one.
    I doubt that many know about Canadian GPA formulas, so it maybe appropriate to include a brief note in the application that helps people understand how to interpret the GPA.

    Beyond this, I think GPA really is a dichotomous variable. Once you are over a 3.4 or 3.5 or so, you will probably look fine on that measure and then evaluated on other credentials. I suppose a 3.9 or so may elicit an extra note of shock and praise on the person evaluating your application, but really there is no sense of choosing someone over another based only on tenths of a point. If your GPA exceeds a basic cutoff, then they focus goes on other things instead, and research experience (for instance) will start to play a much bigger role. I'd take a 3.4 with experience over a 4.0 with none any day.
     
  10. Ilovecows

    Ilovecows 2+ Year Member

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    Hmmmmmmm

    If American schools don't know how to interpret the Candian GPA way, or may not know how, then would they take it as it came if I didn't include any such explanation?

    At my school, a 3.7 = 80%, 4.0 = 85% +. But other Canadian schools have a 9.0 system, and others still use as 4.3 GPA system. If no note of explanation was given....would we all be lumped into the same sorting strategy?


    And now, a different question: I have a diversity of research experience. There's nothing that's particularly cohesive about the experiences except for them resting under the umbrella term of Psychology.
    The one good thing about this maybe is that I can say I've been exposed to diverse areas of the field??

    However, I may potentially have a publication in the area that I'll be applying to for graduate studies. (fairly good possibility)
    I already have a submitted publication (but in a completely different area that is not of any interest to me whatsoever for grad school)
    I've held a SSHRC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council) award for the summer that just past (not in an area I will be pursuing for grad studies), and will be applying for one for this upcoming summer (very very directly to what I'll be applying for for graduate studies)


    I know professors look for research fits/matches. How would my diversity of experience affect how well I can establish my fit? Would it help or hinder? Does the one potential publication in the area of interest to me greatly help? Does the one submitted publication (1st authored) in the area of non-interest help me at all?

    (I'll be applying in 08 to start in 09).


    Thanks so much, and sorry for the long question.
     
  11. JockNerd

    JockNerd 5+ Year Member

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    When I applied, my recollection is that most schools' applications listed the denominator they wanted they wanted the GPA to be out of (i.e. there would be a blank field followed by "/4.0" or whatever). Several included a little conversion legend on the application forms. I ended up having to do about 3 different conversions of my gpa.
     
  12. Therapist4Chnge

    Therapist4Chnge Neuropsych Ninja Faculty Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    That seems to be par for the course, though I don't know if Canadian programs do it the other way. I had to do hand-calculations based on various formulas...it was like a little quiz! :laugh:
     
  13. empathiosis

    empathiosis 7+ Year Member

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    I'll be interviewing at a PsyD program on Monday. What types of questions should I expect to be asked? Also, if you ask students to tell you about themselves, how much of answer do you expect? I'm older so I have a lot to tell but I just want a sense of how much it's appropriate to tell. Thank you!
     
  14. brightness

    brightness 7+ Year Member

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    LOL, do people actually do that?
    Its kind of awesome, but a realllllly bad idea.
     
  15. psypsypsy

    psypsypsy Member 7+ Year Member

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    Ooh, they do! Every year, there's a prospective who comes who just behaves so inappropriately when around the grad students. They're funny stories to tell from year to year...
     
  16. Ilovecows

    Ilovecows 2+ Year Member

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    Hey Dr. ClinPsyAdvice,

    Thanks for all your fantastic advice to everyone thus far!

    I was wondering.... does the reputation of one's undergraduate school affect one's chances of getting into graduate programs? Do professors even care about one's undergraduate school?


    The uni that I'm attending is one really good university. It is one of the best Canadian schools...but also one of the toughest. (Probably the other Canuks on here can take a guess) but I was wondering, was it worth my hard effort?
    Will a GPA of 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, etc at my school be worth the same weight as a GPA of the same at a let's say less prestigious & easier school?

    THANKS !!
     
  17. jh2550a

    jh2550a 5+ Year Member

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    Thanks for taking the time to answer our questions. I have just one: How early is too early to accept an offer? It is my first choice school.
     
  18. Therapist4Chnge

    Therapist4Chnge Neuropsych Ninja Faculty Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    If it meets all of your needs....yesterday. :D It helps free up spots for others (if you have multiple offers). There is no advantage to hold out. Some people can negotiate other little things....but most just accept the offers.
     
  19. JockNerd

    JockNerd 5+ Year Member

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    Accept the offer and withdraw your applications everywhere else! Or, if you think maybe your second or third choices could offer you something to sway you (big fellowship or whatever), don't accept just yet but still withdraw everywhere you know you won't be going.
     
  20. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    Please see some of my comments above about pubs - they are not the end-all, be-all that students seem to think that they are.
    Research experience is good, no matter what the area. If you have some work in an area relevant to your grad school interests, that is also great. But I'd suggest describing all of it, and most importantly, what you have learned from each experience that has helped you develop into an independent scientist.
     
  21. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    Sorry - i do not know very much about PsyD programs. I suspect that if you are asked to talk about yourself, you may want to discuss your research (and perhaps clinical) interests. You might explain where these interests came from, and what your professional autobiography involves, but minimal detail would probably be sufficient.

    In addition to your interests, you also may be asked to talk about your goals after graduation and what you perceive to be the match between your interests and the program where you are applying.
     
  22. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    Oh yes! You wouldn't believe what some people think is appropriate on interview weekend!

    (Don't be one of those people!)
     
  23. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    Yes, it definitely makes a difference. Your GPA is kind of calibrated based on the school you went to. All 4.0s are not created equal!
     
  24. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    If you feel confident in your decision, Accept Now! If you need more data, hang in there.

    If you decide now, you are helping to free up the log jam the occurs between April 1 and April 15. It is very bad form to hold more than 2 offers at any one time because it clogs the whole system. So quick decisions are good (as long as you feel comfortable making them!)
     
  25. waitingizfun

    waitingizfun

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    Thank you so much for your thoughtful answers!!

    I just have one quick question about follow up email. I did an interview about three weeks ago and I didn't write a thank you email afterward. (I still don't know if it's necessary.) Do most people write it? Would it be weird and out of nowhere to email the prof. now and ask for my status? How would you feel about getting an email three weeks later?
     
  26. jcam17

    jcam17 2+ Year Member

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    I was put on the waiting list at my top choice school. They said I should hear back regarding any changes by march. Should I contact them and affirm my interest, or inquire about my place on their "short list?" Is there anything else individuals on the wait list can do that might move them up the list? Also, how soon after hearing I am on the wait list would this be appropriate?
     
  27. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    You should ABSOLUTELY write a thank you note after you interview somewhere!
    As for sending one now....better late than never....
     
  28. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    There is usually not much you can do to change your position, except to periodically let them know that you are still out there, available, and interested. Others may fall off the wait list as they get other offers. So, keep in touch.
     
  29. Ilovecows

    Ilovecows 2+ Year Member

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    I have a couple qs re: letters of rec and Stats

    1. If a professor asks you to write yourself a letter of rec and then he/she says they will sign it, what are awesome things to say about yourself? What are some lines that one can add in that really capture a readers attention in a good way? What are some lines that one should entirely avoid?

    2. How important is who you get the letter of rec from? I know you had answered before that getting a letter from someone who knows your research interests vs. some famous person is better, but how much attention do profs pay to WHO wrote your rec letter?

    --
    3. I know you said before in your responses that the specific courses one takes are relatively unimportant. But I've heard that at least the stats marks and stats courses you've taken are important. Is that true? It somewhat makes sense...but ...I want to know from a DCT

    4. I'm in my final year of studies, so will be graduating this year. I plan to appy to start in 09. But before I start, would taking some graduate level courses before applying be a good idea? What (if anything) would it add to my application?

    Thanks Dr.ClinPsyAdvice!
     
  30. CPsyc

    CPsyc

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    DrClinPsyAdvice,

    I was wondering if it is common for interviewers to ask you what you do for a living. I'm currently unemployed but do some volunteer work (it's once a week) and am looking for an RA position in my area. I don't know how I would answer the question in a way that would portray myself in a positive way. I'm afraid that if I say that I'm unemployed it will leave a bad impression (e.g., that I'm either lazy or have a poor work ethic). How do you think I should answer the question if I'm asked about my occupation?
     
  31. Markp

    Markp Clinical Psychologist 7+ Year Member

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    Better than saying drug dealer or prostitute... Simply tell them you took time off to have the flexibility to interview.

    Mark
     
  32. empathiosis

    empathiosis 7+ Year Member

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  33. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    #1. The truth is that so many letters are so good, that they all end up seeming the same. So, anything that seems vague and generally plain ol'complimentary is fine. But a great letter might make some favorable comparison between this applicant and the advisor's history with students in the past. Or, it may offer some details about a specific skill or area of competence that the applicant possesses - this helps to make the letter stand out and be less vague.

    #2. Yes, WHO does matter, but mostly if it is someone that the potential mentor works with, respects, or know about in the field. This doesn't mean someone famous necessarily - just someone who may overlap in research interests. This isn't a must, but it sometimes helps. I know that it plays a big role for me when reading letters.

    #3. Nah, not a big deal. I doubt many people scrutinize the transcript at all. Personally, stats was my worst undergrad grade, and it didn't seem to affect my application experience at all.

    #4. Grad level courses are nice to have on your record, because it shows that you can do grad level work. But I still say that research experience trumps all else for improving your application when it reaches the short list.
     
  34. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    I never heard anyone ask that. It is probably assumed that you are either an undergrad or someone working in a low paid RA position (or at McDonald's while volunteering for a research project).
     
  35. Ilovecows

    Ilovecows 2+ Year Member

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    My prof just told me that when writing letters for students she doesn't like, she makes "letters subtly show red flags". I'm supposing you can't figure out her actual manouvers, but what could letter writers say that could be so covertly under-the-table professor-speak bad? Or is that a secret?

    Really super curious.
    Thanks!
     
  36. Therapist4Chnge

    Therapist4Chnge Neuropsych Ninja Faculty Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Hopefully the professor can let the person know if they won't be able to write them a strong LOR, though sometimes the person still wants one. Since it is a LOR and they are signing their name to it, honesty sometimes mean taking the good with the bad.

    I've been asked for recommendations (on the biz side) and I always try to be honest with my evaluation. If the person is a good candidate, but they have things they need to work on....let's say better time management skills. I'd probably phrase it something like this: "Mr.Smith has shown strengths in X, Y, and Z, while continuing to work on improving her time management skills". Or if they are aiming to work in a supervisory role, but I don't think they are there yet, I'd write something like, "Though Mr. Smith currently works in a technical role, he aspires to eventually be in a supervisory role, and would benefit from further mentoring and guidance in his next position."

    A LOR can tank a person by saying something like, "Mr. Smith does not work well with others and frequently misses deadlines because of poor time management and under developed interpersonal skills." Hopefully that person lets the student know that they should look elsewhere for a LOR, instead of tanking them.
     
  37. cara susanna

    cara susanna 7+ Year Member

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    Yeah, okay, so I was considering joining this forum and this thread cemented it. So hi everyone, I'm new here!

    I was wondering if I had any chance whatsoever of even being considered by any program if my GRE Quant is in the 500's. I haven't taken the test yet, but I'm worried (I'm taking a course in March so hopefully that will help, but we'll see). This is just quant, though; my verbal score is pretty good (above 600) on the practice tests. My GPA is a 3.7 right now, if it helps, and I was told that I'll have strong LORs. I also have research experience, including some clinical research.

    Thanks so much!
     
  38. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    No offense to your prof, but that sounds mean! If I write a letter for someone it is a good one. And if it is someone that I don't feel I can recommend, I suggest another letter writer.

    The worst thing that one sees in a letter is 'damning with faint praise.' But this is rare, since most people ensure that they will receive only favorable letters.
     
  39. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    It's very hard to guess these things from just a little info. But the best thing to do would be to visit the websites of clinical programs you are interested in. By APA rule, they must list the stats of their incoming classes for the past 5 years. You will see whether folks have come in with scores in your range.
     
  40. ClinicalGal

    ClinicalGal 7+ Year Member

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    Oh no! I did this... but only because i thought that's what you're supposed to do... write all about your interests, research, plans... and then tailor one paragraph to the school... other thoughts anyone?
     
  41. cara susanna

    cara susanna 7+ Year Member

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    DrClinPsyAdvice: Thanks. My target schools tend to list GRE quant in the 600's, I was just wondering if they'd overlook a 500 if I was strong enough in other areas and had a good verbal.

    Edit: ChiaChia: Ohh, that makes sense.
     
  42. chiachia

    chiachia 5+ Year Member

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    i could be wrong but i think the comment had more to do with not speaking about interests in research, what research you want to do, what your experiences are thus far and then how that ties into the specific school and just talking about how psychology helps people and you want to help people and then just jump into that paragraph out of nowhere...
     
  43. Markp

    Markp Clinical Psychologist 7+ Year Member

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    $20 bucks spent on the Princeton Review GRE book was worth it's weight in gold for the Quant section. Work all the problems until you understand how to approach each type of problem... the numbers change but the concepts don't raised my score dramatically. Your Mileage May Vary, but $20 seems like a low risk proposition which is why I suggest it.

    Mark
     
  44. cara susanna

    cara susanna 7+ Year Member

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    Thanks for the advice, but I've tried every prep book in the business and nothing's helped. So if the course doesn't work, I'm basically out of luck.
     
  45. PsychResearchGo

    PsychResearchGo 2+ Year Member

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    DrClinPsyAdvice.....Thank you so much for offering to help out in this way! It is greatly appreciated.

    I have a question about finding work as a full-time research assistant. What do you think are the best ways to find a position of this type? I've been out of school (in undergraduate psych) for many years now, and I no longer have any contacts with professors. Any thoughts or suggestions?

    Thanks!
     
  46. Therapist4Chnge

    Therapist4Chnge Neuropsych Ninja Faculty Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    My 2 cents......

    1. Hit up every local college and university (research through the web and make some informed contacts via e-mail / telephone).

    2. Contact your county/county APA office and see if they can put you in touch with people. There is often a disconnect between the students and practicing professionals, and in my experience the county/state associations have been very open to working with students. It can be very hit and miss, but sometimes people know people who are conducting research. I'm not sure if it will have FT positions, but it might be a way to network.
     
  47. kyril

    kyril 5+ Year Member

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    hello cara susanna! i am someone who has always scored very well on verbal tests, but very very poorly on quant. ones (back in the day when the SAT's were like the GRE and the high score was 800, I got a 800 V and a 550 Q). i took a kaplan classroom prep course in hopes of increasing my Q score, and, honestly, i found it a waste of time. my verbal was already fine, and most of the course time on V was spent with students who struggled with the various V sections, and especially ESL students, and most of the students were actually more advanced than me with quant, except for a few who had forgotten fractions, long division, etc. and were understandably FREAKED OUT and their questions took up most of the teachers time. the teacher was also pretty bad (awful really) at getting back to me if i had questions. after the class, i found no improvement on my Q practice tests, and ended up teaching myself using both a basic college math textbook and princeton and kaplan books, and i pulled my score up 100 pts, which helped a lot.

    if i had it to do over, i would have taken the kaplan online course and kept access to TONS of online testing resources but saved myself $600 + dollars, and maybe spent that extra $$ on private tutoring for the parts that i really struggled with. in the end, the Q GRE seemd to me to be about basic math concepts (if you don't know how to do the math, which is mostly junior high level, you are toast), the bizarre annoying problems that the GRE contains, and tricks to attack them quickly and find out what the question is really asking, because so often an geometry problem is really about algebra, etc. i tackled the first two aspects of the GRE on my lonesome and did alright, but i never master the "tricks" to the GRE, and i think a tutor could have really helped me with that and made me more competitive. just my 2 cents.
     
  48. thedrandmr

    thedrandmr 2+ Year Member

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    I was in pretty much exactly situation. I'd been out of school for 10 years, working in private industry, and had no contact with former professors. I found the two best things to do were volunteer and network. Through a combination of the two, I got involved in a lab with a well-known researcher who then wrote great letters of recommendation.
     
  49. thewesternsky

    thewesternsky 10+ Year Member

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    Dear DrClinPsyAdvice,
    I have a few questions about waitlists.

    1) How does the waitlist process work?

    2) Do all schools have waitlists? Are there schools that simply make offers and if all the students go elsewhere, then there are no incoming students that year?

    3) Is it acceptable to inquire about your place on a waitlist? Is it better to ask a graduate secretary or your professor of interest?

    Thank you so much for your help!
     
  50. ArthenaDent

    ArthenaDent Clinical psych FTW! 2+ Year Member

    21
    0
    Jan 28, 2008
    Champaign, IL
    Here's how I got my full-time research assistant position:
    1. I found people whose research I really like. (I did this as part of the grad school application process.)
    2. I asked my undergraduate research supervisor (with whom I had an excellent working relationship) to vouch for me. Since you don't have contact with professors, I'm not sure whom you could ask to serve as a reference.
    3. In the summer, when many labs are making budgetary decisions, I e-mailed the professors whose work I admire. I apologized for the unsolicited e-mail, then asked if they were in need of extra help.
    4. Two labs e-mailed back, expressing interest. Both contacted my reference person before doing this.
    5. Through e-mails and phone calls, I was able to reach an employment agreement with one of the labs. I politely turned down the offer from the other one.
    6. I had never been to the town where my new job was located, so I asked around. Hearing it was a nice place to live, I found an apartment and moved there sight unseen!

    I got my job because I e-mailed at the right time, was willing to relocate, and put myself out there. Definitely don't be afraid to contact labs/workplaces you're interested in, even if they're not advertising a position. My lab never advertises, not even when they really could use the help!
     
  51. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

    489
    31
    Jan 22, 2008
    Well, sadly they might unless there was something that led them to look more closely. If you have any connections or have an advisor who may send them a heads-up to look out for you, then that could help them make sure that they take a closer look.
     

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