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Advice from Prof for Applicants to PhD Programs

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by DrClinPsyAdvice, Jan 22, 2008.

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  1. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    Using PsychInfo, find profs doing research in your area of interest. Write to them directly and ask them if they need assistance. If they say no, ask them whether they know anyone who does.
    Also, join the listserves of APA divisions or other professional societies that match your interests. Look for postings about RAs, or if you see postings for a postdoc, write to them and ask whether they also need RAs (usually a postdoc posting means they have a grant, which means they might also need RAs).

    Be very persistent! It's tough, but you'll find something!
     
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  3. cara susanna

    cara susanna 7+ Year Member

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    Okay, thanks. I guess I'll just work even harder to raise my quant and hope for the best.
     
  4. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    Good questions. This varies from school to school. In many cases, it is based on specific slots for each advisor. If they do not get the student who they first made an offer to, then they ask their second choice. So, it is a within-lab situation. In other cases, it is a program-wide waitlist. And still others do not have a waitlist, as you described above.

    Sure, you can inquire about your position. It would probably not hurt your chances at all if you ask in a respectful way. In fact, it may convey that you have decisions to make and need to know (and that you are interested in them).
     
  5. PsychResearchGo

    PsychResearchGo 2+ Year Member

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    Thank you for the advice! I'll make sure to proceed with that.
     
  6. bluelight44

    bluelight44 2+ Year Member

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    Hi, DrClinPsyAdvice :

    I have a quick question:

    I e-mailed my POI regarding my application status, and I received his reply telling me that it was unlikely that I would be admitted. Does it matter if I don't reply to this e-mail and thank him (it is really awkward to say thank you for telling me I am rejected). But I feel not so good because we contacted each other long time ago and he actually showed a great interest in my application also strongly encouraged me to apply to their program at the very beginning.

    Thank you!
     
  7. Ilovecows

    Ilovecows 2+ Year Member

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    Hi Dr. ClinPsyAdvice:

    Thank you so much for your advice on this matter (long question --sorry!):

    I have a choice on who to work for before applying to graduate school. I'll be applying in 08 to start in 09. One of my professors told me that the work you do before you apply to grad school is absolutely the most critical piece of work you do. (it's what counts the most given all your research experience).

    #1 How true is that?

    #2. I have three choices of who to work for.

    A) A professor who has given me a SSHRC award (last summer), loves me to bits, thinks I'm just awesome etc. I'll have another SSHRC grant award if I work for her. The chances of getting a publication with her are absolute none. I'm not so interested in her work....

    B) A not-famous professor, not-all that well known but is doing exactly what I want to do for graduate school. I'll probably get a publication (first-authored) out of it because it was I who approached him with the idea, did a lit review, applied for ethics, submitted proposals to the university psych pool etc. But from him, I won't get a SSHRC award because he's just come to Canada and hasn't applied yet for one.

    C) A professor whom I also did work for last summer. And wants to give me a SSHRC grant for this year. I'm somewhat interested in his work. The chances of me getting a publication with him are slim but not none.

    So, of the three choices it's: A) gotten a SSHRC grant and will get another (evidence of continuity?) ,no publication. B) from the states, no SSHRC grant, but first-authored publication. C) will get a SSHRC grant (no continuity from last year tho)

    You mentioned a few times that pubs are not the be-all-end-all things they are thought to be. So then is having a SSHRC grant better? Is having a SSHRC grant from the same person I had a SSHRC grant with last year better than having a SSHRC grant from a new person?

    SSHRC = Social Sciences and Humanties Research Council Award (like NSERC but on the Social Side)

    Thanks!
     
  8. psybee

    psybee Psychology Grad Student! 5+ Year Member

    Hello Dr!

    Your advice has been great - I've read the whole thread and it's helped calm some serious nerves - thank you so much!!


    I have a question myself. I was given an interview invite to my top choice, via email, which asked me to schedule faculty and grad student interviews. I responded to the two interviewers right away, and as of a week ago, my professor had offered up some days and times, and asked me to select one, which i did (i said that X day was perfect, any time, but that it was still early enough that if day X was a problem for the other interviewer, Y and Z would be possible too). the other interviewer said that day X was fine for him too, and just to let him know what time on day X the professor had chosen, and he'd schedule his meeting with me accordingly.

    That was a week ago, and i haven't heard from the professor since. Should I send the prof a follow up/reminder email, or would that be pushy? in a professional setting, i would likely send an email, but i am of course a) over-thinking this - i love this program and it is my top choice, and b) have never had to schedule a meeting with someone who, to me, anyway, is so powerful or senior in status and yet not had an assistant as an intermediary. at the same time, i know at this program grad students are treated as junior colleagues (another great aspect of the program), and so i may be treating the whole process more formally than this program, or professor, does.

    anyway, i know this is a nit picky question, but etiquette in academia sometimes seems a lot more fluid and amorphous than in the 9-5 world, and i want to make sure i get off on the right foot...

    many thanks
     
  9. hopinghokie

    hopinghokie 2+ Year Member

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    DrClinPsyAdvice, my husband asked me to post this question for him to get your opinion (other posters feel free to respond too)...

    He has an interview at one of his top choice schools and has not personally sent an email yet to his POIs introducing himself and expressing his interest in working with them. He wants to send an email just stating that he hopes to meet them while he is down there for his interview and reaffirming his interest in their research. The question is it too late in the game to send this kind of email since he's already been selected for an interview or is it better late than never?

    Thank you very much!!!
     
  10. empathiosis

    empathiosis 7+ Year Member

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    Let's see what the DR. will say but I think at this point it's definitely too late and unnecessary. He's already gotten an interview and he'll get to meet them and tell them how enthused he is about their work. But maybe others would think of it as a polite gesture. I'm often a bad judge of these things.
     
  11. empathiosis

    empathiosis 7+ Year Member

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    DrClinPsyAdvice, How do you suggest handling thank yous? Should they be sent to the DCT, every prof one interviewed with and students, if they hosted you? Also, is e-mail ok or should they be snail-mailed? Finally, should they be short and sweet or is it ok to elaborate, perhaps even further answering a question if you feel you didn't answer it fully during the interview? I appreciate your response!
     
  12. LeeS

    LeeS 7+ Year Member

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    Dear Dr. ClinPsych,

    Like everyone reading this thread, I am very thankful for your answers.

    I was hoping you could clarify the "High" Alternate list situation some candidates may find themselves in. I know that it means that in a given admission year a candidate is likely to get into the school but with a chance of not gaining funding.

    Why would they stick an applicant on the list without interviewing them? Should people on a High Alternate list position have high hopes of eventually being accepted in said school as admissions process comes to an end? and is it likely, they will get in without funding? Especially, at schools were 100% funding is usually provided?

    Kind Regards and thanks again!
     
  13. GiantSteps

    GiantSteps 5+ Year Member

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    Professor,

    There is friendly debate on another SDN Thread (the Only One Interview Thread) as to the benefit of contacting either the admission's office or one's POI, if one is not accepted, in order to learn how one might improve one's chances (what were your areas of weakness) for a future application. I contend that, if someone did not even make the interviews, the admissions people or the POI will have little to say other than a regurgitation of the rejection letter since they would hardly remember the applicant. If one made the interview but was still cut, I am sure the professor would at least remember the applicant but still would have little to say other than generalities about there being many fine applicants for only a few spaces (accept for a rare response that the professor was unable to bring on anyone due to funding). In short, if a rejected applicant contacts you, do you have anything helpful/ constructive to tell him/ her or can you only offer more kind words of condolences?
     
  14. Hain Adam

    Hain Adam 2+ Year Member

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    I have another question. :D

    Today I got an e-mail from my top choice that I am waitlisted for acceptance without interviews, so if enough people who got accepted decline their offers new spots will open and I will be able to get in. The e-mail said that they have a limited number of spots, otherwise I am a very strong candidate who they'd like to have in their program. I am assuming that the biggest reason they have such limited number of spots might be issues about funding. My question is: would it be appropriate for me to ask them if I could increase my chances of acceptance by funding myself at least in the first year? Would that actually work? Thanks!
     
  15. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    I know it is hard, but send the note. Be gracious and kind. It's a small world out there, and this same person could be your reviewer for manuscripts, grants, or tenure one day.
     
  16. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    You may be over-thinking this a bit. Work with the person who's interest matches your interests. More than any grant or pub on your CV, it will be your knowledge, enthusiasm, and experience about a specific area of research that will essential for matching with a mentor. Assuming that your credentials are OK, a well-written essay conveying the factors listed above makes all of the difference.
     
  17. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    A single polite, respectful email prompt never hurts. As long as you acknowledge that they are very busy, and that you just wanted to double-check that they received your message, it should be fine. I think when one does this routinely or seems to express a ton of anxiety (or gets annoying) in the email, then it can spell trouble. But sometimes a little nudging is helpful, and may even be appreciated.
     
  18. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    If he is about to meet them in person, it does not seem necessary to send an advance email. I suppose there are pros and cons that could make either decision here an OK decision. But if I got such an email, I might feel it was a little unnecessary. In-person communication is always so much more effective anyway.

    (Having said this, if I DID receive such an email, it wouldn't turn me off to the applicant at all. I'd probably just shrug it off and assume that the applicant is very interested...and that's not so bad either)
     
  19. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    Short and sweet, unless there is something you genuinely want to convey. Expressing interest is always good. Email vs snail mail does not matter at all. And a note to the DCT and potential mentor (and perhaps the grad student who housed you) would be plenty. In fact, just 1 of these notes would be fine, with a sentence in there asking for them to please pass along your gratitude to the others.

    Thank you notes will not get anyone in (or keep anyone out) of grad school. But it is a professional gesture that expresses gratitude in a way that seems quite appropriate after one has been hosted at a program for a day-long interview. I've heard so many faculty talk about how surprising it is that students do not do this as often as they used to!
     
  20. scienceisbeauty

    scienceisbeauty 2+ Year Member

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    The clinical schools that I'll be applying to are very research focused.
    Now. I have to decide what to do.

    Either, I can work (paid work) in a hospital setting as a clinician that is very much involved in the type of reseach work I want to do (but there's zero research component in that particular job). *Or* I can do pure research (unpaid or paying in dimes and nickels) in an area completely unrelated to my interests.

    What do you suggest?

    Thanks,
    SIB
     
  21. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    Not sure I am familiar with this exact term, as it is described here.

    If I tell someone that they are a high alternate, then that usually means that they are quite high on the wait list and as soon as someone declines an offer (or more funding comes through), they will be getting a call. Not sure how many PhD programs out there are admitting students without funding - that sounds scary.
     
  22. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    I generally agree with your comments. There is often not that much to say, and if not invited for an interview, then it is hard to remember the applicant. Contacting profs with these kinds of questions after April 15 may be a bit more likely to yield a response, if only because we are all so swamped right now with admissions, that it is hard to dig through the piles of folders to offer an educated response.

    I have had a few students contact me after an interview, and I did have something specific to tell them. In these cases, the students seemed not yet 'ready' - either because they had not seriously thought about what kind of research they wanted to do in grad school, or because as a research assistant they seemed to do chores, but not develop any research ideas/hypotheses of their own. We don't expect much on the interviews in these regards, but many successful applicants can speak in some detail to ideas that they are more/less excited about. So, this was feedback that helped the students seek different experience on their RA positions, and think more critically about their interests.
     
  23. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    Some programs are OK with self-funding and others are not. If the funding comes from something like a NSF grant, then they will do back flips to get you! But if you mean from your own personal savings, this may be less welcome.

    You may want to wait a few weeks to see how things shake down with the other applicants, and then mention the self-funding option later. It can't hurt to offer the possibility!
     
  24. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    I'd suggest finding a third option! Neither of these sounds ideal.

    Or perhaps you can work a little in both places?

    Ok, if you're forcing me to make a decision, all other things being equal, I might say that the research experience might be better. Perhaps you will learn new methodologies or ideas that you can then apply to your area of interest? Also, the research job may yield a letter of rec for you from someone who can attest to your research skills?

    This is a tough one, but if you want a research focused program, then I think the research job may win out here.
     
  25. scienceisbeauty

    scienceisbeauty 2+ Year Member

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    Yipes, I should have asked this question a while back...buuuuuut

    I know in interviews, POIs might ask how how one would handle conflict / how one has handled conflict in terms of relationships with professors etc

    I have a story about conflict, a big scary story. Basically, I was taking an honours thesis stream psych program. But, my advisor and I got into a major disagreement over really ridiculous (in my opinion) things. He lied to others about the conflict, placed me at the centre of blame, etc. I resolved this by first speaking with him to ask if we could lessen the tension between us, and that I'd be willing to drop a few other responsibiities to devote more time to the lab. He forced me to drop 2 classes and add 8 hours to my lab work time.

    I thought it was resolved. However, he continued to talk about how I was an "undedicated student" and cost me a scholarship (literally!!). So then, I talked to the thesis head and showed her all of the emails that my advisor and I had sent back and forth. I did this to prove that he was making up stuff.

    When the thesis head saw this, she immediately said. Hmm..that's not how your advisor told me it went down. It's so unfortunate that he'd lie when you had such pure proof.
    We talked about options for resolving the tension between my advisor and I. She said I drop the honours thesis stream entirely. She said that since I have 2 pubs, have done 2 independent projects, and have wonderful relations with other faculty members, that should be okay.
    In fact, she said: I wouldn't keep working under him even if I were 10 feet seperated and in a different country.

    So when it came to talk to my advisor: I was *super nice*. I gently told him that due to the tension in our relationship, I'd prefer to not pursue the honours thesis stream and would instead work on a non-thesis stream. I said that this decision consequently would affect my ability to work in his lab. However, I graciously offered to finish up the study I was working on with him. But said I wouldn't work beyond this 1 extra month. He didn't respond.

    Oh, and by the way, he left the department and went to another university in the states. Then after he left, he emailed me and said he was very sorry for being so mean to me. (heh). He said that I was smart to talk to him about how to lessen the tension and how it was appropriate of me to talk to the thesis head so he could get a (his words, his words) "kick in the nuts".


    So. Can I say that I have had experience with resolving conflict and use this as an example? Or does it sound so mean? Or would it make me sound petty? one-sided? or "trying to be funny"? I dunno.

    - Just curious -
     
  26. empathiosis

    empathiosis 7+ Year Member

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  27. Girlie87

    Girlie87 2+ Year Member

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    So, I think this is relevant...I'm an undergrad and will be going to my first conference soon. I'm co-authoring a poster, and very excited. Any advice, esp. concerning interactions with the big guys? I want to apply to PhD programs, and I know a few research orientations I enjoy and that I'm going to need lots of help getting into school.
     
  28. SpoiledKiwi

    SpoiledKiwi 2+ Year Member

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    Thanks so much for answering questions! I just have one that I've been thinking about for the past couple of days.

    I'm currently a junior in college and can't decide between taking a year off or applying to grad school. I have an ok gpa - 3.4 general, 3.95 psych (having taken all of my psych classes). I screwed up my gpa in my freshman year because I was taking all premed classes. I've been an RA in my advisor's lab for a year and I'm currently in the honors program.

    When I apply, I'll only have a 3.4 and my experience as an RA. By the time I gradaute, I'll have around a 3.5, experience as an RA, first authorship on a paper, and a presentation at a conference.

    My question is, how do grad schools take into account that by the time you graduate your credentials will be much better than what is currently on your applications? Would it be better to take a year off and make sure that all of that stuff is on my CV?
     
  29. LedZepp007

    LedZepp007 5+ Year Member

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    This may or may not have been asked already (I hope not--I didn't have time to read every post in this thread, unfortunately), but I will ask anyways. I have been invited for three interviews and I am somewhat frightened by my competition (naturally). I am guessing that each professor who is accepting students for the upcoming term is allowed to take one or two students for their lab. So, how many applicants do POIs generally invite to interview and of these how many usually get accepted? I know there is probably quite a bit of variability between schools, but this is something I am worried about nonetheless. Thanks a lot.
     
  30. Markp

    Markp Clinical Psychologist 7+ Year Member

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    They will often take 2-4 interviewees for each slot. You shouldn't worry about your competition, as there is nothing that you can do about them and focusing on them does little but add to your stress level. Stay focused on being yourself, relaxing, and asking questions about the program. You should know why you think that you are a good fit for the program. Focus on you and not your competition.

    Mark
     
  31. Markp

    Markp Clinical Psychologist 7+ Year Member

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    Meet lots of people and ask them about their work. Networking is an awesome way to build rapport and to not be just another faceless name in the pile. Stay excited and find out as much as you can from the types of programs that you are interested in.

    Mark
     
  32. cara susanna

    cara susanna 7+ Year Member

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    May I ask for further elaboration on that? Do you mean that the students never did any independent studies of their own?
     
  33. Ilovecows

    Ilovecows 2+ Year Member

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    Hello Dr.ClinPsyAdvice,

    I think from all my "conversion of GPA questions" what I was really trying to get at is....

    Generally, what %age numerically is representative of a 3.5?
    Generally, what letter grade represents a 3.5?

    There's all this talk here...I hear and see on grad school's websites that you must have a 3.5 etc. But they are talking in States terms. Really, what does a 3.5 mean?

    This would help clear things up for Canadians I think since we work on varied systems. There you guys are more uniform?

    Thank you Dr.ClinPsyAdvice
     
  34. clinhopeful

    clinhopeful

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    You can find explanations of this on the web:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GPA#North_America
     
  35. BorntoRun

    BorntoRun 5+ Year Member

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    LeeS, am I reading this right, that you were made a high alternate somewhere without interviewing there? Was it at a place that typically doesn't do interviews? From everything I've heard, that's a really unusual situation to be in!
     
  36. lavalubby111

    lavalubby111 2+ Year Member

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    DCTs don't often have the time or care just so much to respond to so many questions from people. How do we know you aren't someone just trying to "pull the wool over our eyes"?
    You said that you're from a competitive research university, but how are we supposed to ensure the truth of this? Or even the truth of you being a DCT? Maybe you're a grad student, or some random person.
    I'm just saying. Someone had to ask it. Better the new person who no one knows of yet. I can always create a new account if someone gets mad at me for asking.
    Because I told my friend about this site, and she said "are you sure it's a DCT" and to her I had to respond with no.
    And if you are a DCT how come you don't have that advisor badge on your profile? Shouldn't a moderator on this forum have given you one?
     
  37. Hain Adam

    Hain Adam 2+ Year Member

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    I see the critical thinking coming in play. :laugh:
     
  38. lucyguard

    lucyguard 7+ Year Member

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    I asked the same thing in another thread but I think this may be a better place to get a good answer.

    Question: I only got one interview so far (and it looks like this will be the only one). If during the interview I am asked about other programs I'm applying to and other interviews I have lined up (like you said the POI may be interested in knowing about the "competition"), will it hurt me to say that I only got that one interview? Will I seem like a not so competitive applicant because no one else was interested? How could I handle that question?
     
  39. JockNerd

    JockNerd 5+ Year Member

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    I understand your skepticism, but I'm not sure how there could be a solution to that or what you would expect to come of the post; it's not as if it would be appropriate for the DCT to state what program he or she is with.
     
  40. Therapist4Chnge

    Therapist4Chnge Neuropsych Ninja Faculty Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    I verified that he is who he says he is, and that he is from a competitive research university.
     
  41. lavalubby111

    lavalubby111 2+ Year Member

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    Good! I think that the DCT deserves one of those advisor badges. The kind that Dr.Neuro (who is on the mentor forum) has.
     
  42. Lindz

    Lindz 5+ Year Member

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    Actually, I met someone from SDN during the interview process - a very nice and competent person I might add - who is from the school where the DCT works. In fact, he alerted the DCT to this blog and got him involved. I can assure you, he is legit.
     
  43. deener84

    deener84

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    Hi Dr.ClinPsyAdvice,

    First off, I want to thank you for being so kind as to answer everyone's questions! I've read the whole thread and found your responses extremely helpful! I know there have already been some questions asked about how to best prepare for interviews, but I'm going to be interviewing at my first choice school and, for the first time, I will be interviewing with 2 graduate students as well. I was just wondering what to expect from an interview with graduate students, since I have never done this before? One of them has been working in the lab of the professor whom I would like to work with, so I'm assuming I should be familiar with the grad student's research, but I don't even know what lab the other grad student is working at, so not sure how to prep for that. I am also interviewing with several faculty members, many of which I did not actually indicate a desire to have as an advisor in my personal statement. Should I still read all their research articles? Or just have a general idea of their research? I'm not really sure if they are interviewing me for their lab or just to see if I am compatible with the program as a whole.

    Finally, I have been told that it is not a good idea to have an assistant professor as your mentor if you can help it, because a more established professor will help you be more competitive for a tenure-track position later on. Is this true? What if you can work with a pretty famous professor, but he isn't doing much research any more, is that also a bad idea? It seems so hard to manage to not only secure a spot in a program with a good reputation but also be lucky enough to work with a professor whom you get along with and who is well-established in the field and still producing lots of research!

    Thank you SO much for all your help!!
     
  44. KimS03

    KimS03

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    Thank you in advance for your guidance in this sometimes difficult process!

    I am a student of School Psychology, with an M.S. and one year internship left to certification. Although I deeply respect and appreciate the field- I am not completely satisfied by it, for reasons too lengthy to get into! I have applied to some Clinical and Counseling Psych PhD programs, to be able to have some alternate options to consider for next year- apart from doing an unpaid full time internship in a field I am not entirely dedicated to or passionate about!

    To my surprise I have an interview in a week (yay!) for a program. I KNOW they will address this issue, particularly because it is for the same school that I attend now- and some of the faculty overlap programs! I have a feeling that there are some sour feelings about my decision to switch tracks.

    I am wondering which approach to take:
    1. That I deeply respect the field but it does not satisfy my own curiosities and interests, and be truthful about the things I dont like in my current field and why clin/couns psych is a better match
    2. That I just want to continue my education in children's mental health, and downplay the dissatisfaction with my current program.

    Although I always think that honesty is best and want to be truthful about my reasoning, I simultaneously do not want to offend those professors whose program I am leaving, and who have a say in my admissions decision.

    Any thoughts? Thanks!!
     
  45. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    Although the situation ended up OK, I think this is a tough story to tell on an interview without some potential red flags coming up. When someone asks about a conflict story, I think they are really asking, "How open are you to feedback and how can you grow from adversity?" So, a he said-she said story usually sounds ugly, potentially unprofessional, and it does not typically meet the objectives. I would tell they story in a way that discusses what you learned, and shows little controversy.
     
  46. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    Jan 22, 2008
    Ask lots of questions, be enthusiastic, and just learn. One of my mentors once told me that so many students introduce themselves at conferences. Most all were appropriate, professional, etc. Consequently, the only people he remembered are those who stood out in a bad way. It turns out this is true. So, I would not worry about it too much. If you are generally appropriate, you will not make a bad impression, and the interaction is more for you to learn than to make an impression
     
  47. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    Jan 22, 2008
    A large proportion of psych applicants were previously pre-med, so this is a common story. The difference between a 3.4 and a 3.5 on your CV will not make a big difference. The RA experience and Honors thesis is a much bigger deal. If you think you are ready to be a grad student, apply now.
     
  48. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    Jan 22, 2008
    2-5 interviewees for every slot, usually.
    sometimes more funding comes up after interview day, and they can accept 1 more than they thought!
     
  49. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    Jan 22, 2008
    There's a difference between someone who is a good RA (follows directions, does what is asked of them), and someone who is on track to be a good independent scientist (can come up with hypothesis, critique the literature, etc). Someone who does the former but not the latter sometimes does not come off well in an interview. It seems they are applying for a RA position, rather than to become a Ph.D
     
  50. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    Jan 22, 2008
    3.5 is about a B+ average. 3.0 is a B. 3.7 is A-, and 4.0 is an A
     
  51. DrClinPsyAdvice

    DrClinPsyAdvice SDN Advisor SDN Advisor 7+ Year Member

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    Jan 22, 2008
    It's Ok to be skeptical...but if you are interviewing at a program where the DCT does not have time for students or does not care, then think twice about that program! This is our job, and you need to make sure that you are in a place that cares about training.

    Thanks for info on this 'badge.' I never heard of that, but will look into it.
     

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