Advice on MD or DO

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by goldenjims, Dec 28, 2001.

  1. goldenjims

    goldenjims Junior Member

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    OK,

    I have been accepted to several DO schools and am still waiting to hear from MD schools. My two in state MD schools are likely to accept me, wishful thinking I guess but it looks pretty good. Let's say that I am accepted by both MD schools, I truthfully cannot foresee myself picking on school over the other. I guess I see it as getting pretty much the exact same education, with the OMM addition at DO. Anyone have this kinda situation when applying? What made you go one way or the other? After six years of battling to get into any med school, this is a grateful place to be for me. It is foreign to even have to make a decision over a couple of schools. I'm used to the postcard rejection notices. Any advice is appreciated.
     
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  3. cchoukal

    cchoukal Senior Member
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    I think there are probably a number of other threads addressing this issue, so a quick search should turn up what you're looking for... My own advice, though, would be to go to an MD school if you get into one, unless you have some profound and specific interest in osteopathic medicine. There will be disagreement with this statement, I'm sure, but generally speaking, it's harder to get a choice MD residency with a DO degree than with an MD. Yeah, you can maybe specialize in most anything you'd like with a DO degree, but you'll probably struggle to get in and feel like you're always having to prove yourself. The OMM you'd get at a DO school (and my understanding is that many DO schools have been de-emphasizing this over the decades...) could probably be learned elsewhere is some kind of fellowship. Anyway, like I said, there's a buttload of differing opinion on this, so go seek it out...
     
  4. double elle

    double elle Senior Member

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    If you are even remotely interested in finding out what OMM is like, why don't you make an appointment and go see a DO that specializes in manipulative medicine? I love OMM and will certainly practice on my patients, however I know that some people are not quite sure of it. My opinion is that ANY skill that has the potential to relieve pain or make the patient more comfortable is worth learning. If you, or anyone you know, has some sort of problem..lower back, neck, shoulder, anything...suggest they go to a DO and see if they/you like the results. If you honestly find no difference, your decision is made.

    Good luck!
     
  5. double elle

    double elle Senior Member

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    I guess I should also add that I am a 1st year at KCOM, where OMM is heavily taught. Based on how much OMM we have throughout the week, if you honestly didn't like OMM....you would find a lot of your time being 'wasted' learning all that we have to learn.
     
  6. Mr. Eastern Medicine

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    Also, study acupuncture!!
     
  7. drusso

    Physician Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved

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    I disagree. Most all career opportunities will be available to you as a DO just as if you were a MD. The emphasis of your education will be different---likely very primary care oriented. It would be more expensive to take OMM classes after medical school than during medical school if this is indeed a modality you are considering incorporating into your practice. You have to consider both lost income and course fees. DO schools are not de-emphasizing OMM; in fact, there is more of an emphasis now than ever. Most schools have between 300-500 hours of instruction, plus a required clerkship in OMM. Choose DO schools because 1) You like the approach to patient care; 2) You want to learn OMM; 3) The DO schools you've interviewed at offer a quality education.

    Do not choose a DO because you did not get into a MD school. Unfortunately, every year there are students who go to DO schools only because they did not get into a MD school. In general, these students are very unhappy. They dislike OMM, they complain their education is too primary care oriented, and they don't form strong friendship networks. These MD-wannabes tend to be miserable and make those around them miserable. Just keep that in mind...
     
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  9. Freeeedom!

    Freeeedom! Senior Member

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    I personally know 2 students from UHS (DO program) who did Pathology Fellowships during their 3rd year of medical school (therefore increasing their medical school training by one year) at UMKC. One then matched in pathology at Mayo (I believe). The other decided to persue Urology strangely enough.
     
  10. Catherine

    Catherine Senior Member

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    If you have the choice listen to cchoukal and go MD, then you'll have all the opportunities - not just 'most'. (Re: Drusso).

    "Choose DO schools because 1) You like the approach to patient care; 2) You want to learn OMM; 3) The DO schools you've interviewed at offer a quality education."

    (1) Would someone like to tell me how the "approach to patient care" differs in a DO school? The first 2 years is basic science with little to no exposure to patient care. The next 2 years is often spend doing rotations with MD students. I have yet to hear a reasonable offering of osteopathic philosophy that doesn't sound like FP.

    (2) Who wants to learn OMM? Certainly not most of the DO's and DO students I'v ever met.

    (3) Quality education! DO schools have a lower student / faculty ratio and spend time on OMM that could be put to better use. Most DO schools tend to be 10 years behind the times compared to the curricculums offered by many MD schools (not all). Having said that, the education you receive is basically down to you (MD or DO). Most schools don't require you to attend lecture. So, the bottom line is that no matter where you go you'll spend most of your first 2 years with your nose in a book.

    If your only option is DO then seize it and don't look back. Treat OMM like any other class if you're not interested in it - ie. just get on with it and pass. After school is done most people are not fussed about the MD / DO 'thing'.
     
  11. Justin

    Justin Member

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    Catherine,
     
  12. Justin

    Justin Member

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    Catherine,

    Chill out! Did you have a bad experience with an osteopathic physician? Don't falsely lead people to believe that osteopathic physicians do not have opportunities open to them. Being a MD does not guarantee a great residency. Similarly, being a DO does not relegate an individual to a life in primary care. If you want to be a DO specialist than go for it, if you want to be a MD PCP, go for it. Osteopathic pricnciples are different and if you are interested in them, learn about them. Follow your heart, not some biased party.
     
  13. Catherine

    Catherine Senior Member

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    Justin,
    No, I have not had a bad experience etc. It's just a question of lets tell it like it is. Sure some DO's get great positions and some MD don't. But, statisically speaking a MD has a better chance of obtaining the residency they want where they want. Just as it's true that a DO will generally fare better than a carribean graduate.

    I have no wish to start the MD / DO debate - that's been done to death on this site. I take each person as I find them. I'v worked with some great DO's and some useless MD's.

    By the way, please tell me what the principles are that DO's subscribe to - and no, I'm not being antagonistic - I'v just never read anything that applies only to DO's.
     
  14. Justin

    Justin Member

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    Catherine,

    You are spouting ignorant garbage! Osteopathic pricnciples and practices are unique, there are even books written on the subject. OMM is a distinct and valuable tool. I am not ranking on MD schools, in fact I don't care where you went to medical school. But, to say DO schools are not unique is a gross understatement. Osteopathic philosophy is different even if some of its doctors are no different than their allopathic counterparts, remember, a school can only promote a philosophy and certain theraeputic modalities. Yes, I will concede that it is a little easier as an MD to get certain residencies at certain institutions. But, times are evolving into a more enlightened era, and, we do have some of our very own fine residency programs. Also, statistics are an average of many variables. Example, does the match rate for osteopathic students represent individuals who took the COMLEX and the USMLE, or just the COMLEX? I have heard, straight from the hourses mouth, that many directors do not like to deal with comlex scores. Furthermore, osteopathic physicians score a little lower on the USMLE than do MD students, maybe this is why they have a lower match rate, personally, I believe it is a little of everything. So, don't believe everything that you hear or read (especially on an MD discussion board. Hey, what am I doing here anyway? As God as my witness I will never stray again)
     
  15. Justin

    Justin Member

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    Excuse my spelling
     
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  17. Billie

    Billie An Oldie but a Goodie...

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  18. Tazdoc

    Tazdoc Member

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    Catherine,
    You're an interesting character :rolleyes: Why don't you tell Justin and the rest that you are a DO student at CCOM? :confused: <img src="confused.gif" border="0">
     

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