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Some of us may be in the unenviable position of needing to scramble in Radiation Oncology. If you've done it before, helped someone who has, or just know the system from either side of the fence (applicant vs. program), and are willing to provide any advice here or via PM, that would be great! Thanks!
 

thesauce

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I know 1 person who's done it and I spoke to him briefly about it. First thing you need to do is find out which spots on the scramble list are real. The UNC one(s) aren't, so don't waste your time calling them. Wish I could help you more.
 

medgator

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This thread may be helpful to you:

http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=700205

Just remember --- if you don't scramble into a spot, it's not the end of your opportunity to join a program. Once you complete an internship, you're eligible to join any program at the PGY-2 level out of the match.
 

shogun0660

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Just remember --- if you don't scramble into a spot, it's not the end of your opportunity to join a program. Once you complete an internship, you're eligible to join any program at the PGY-2 level out of the match.
I agree with medgator's statement 100%. In fact, scramble for rad onc isn't like medicine or surgery, where spots are actually offered during the scramble. Best case scenario is that you get in contact with any programs that have open spots, and they offer you a chance to interview in the near future.
As another poster suggested, first figure out which spots are real. Then, see if any of your mentors (residents, PDs, attendings, etc) know people at that program. Have them make a call for you to that physician directly, as the program coordinator will be bombarded with emails and phone calls. If they are willing to vouch for you, that should be enough to secure an interview.

And, if that doesnt work out, don't give up hope. More spots open up during the year than one would expect. Maintain your contacts within the field, finish up any ongoing research, start new research--basically continue to show committment and interest in radiation oncology. During my intern year, counting scramble positions, there were at least 9 positions that became available. As I've stated in the past, getting a spot outside the match isn't impossible, and I personally know of (self included) 6-7 people that have successfully done so during their intern year without needing to take any extra time off.
Hope that helps, PM me with any more questions.

:ninja: