Avery07

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So I'm making my way through the classification of life right now and I come across a book telling me that Algae-- green, red, and brown are classified in Protista.

Thinking that at least green algae should be in Plantae, I checked Wikipedia which confirmed my thought.

Does anyone know what the correct grouping is on these organisms? I'm assuming that it's in debate and because of that it wouldn't actually appear on the DAT but nonetheless.

Thanks.
 
Dec 10, 2009
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Some general biology textbook authors place the microscopic, unicellular green algae (Division Chlorophyta) in the Kingdom Protista, and place the larger, multicellular (macroscopic) green algae (Division Chlorophyta) in the Kingdom Plantae. They also place the macroscopic, multicellular brown algae (Division Phaeophyta) and red algae (Division Rhodophyta) in the Kingdom Plantae. In fact, some authors place all of the algae divisions in the Kingdom Plantae. Although the Kingdom Protista includes mostly unicellular organisms, I think they belong to Kingdom Protista.

I checked my Campbell bio book and they place it under the "Protists," but closely related to Plantae ancestors.
hope that helps
 

Avery07

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Some general biology textbook authors place the microscopic, unicellular green algae (Division Chlorophyta) in the Kingdom Protista, and place the larger, multicellular (macroscopic) green algae (Division Chlorophyta) in the Kingdom Plantae. They also place the macroscopic, multicellular brown algae (Division Phaeophyta) and red algae (Division Rhodophyta) in the Kingdom Plantae. In fact, some authors place all of the algae divisions in the Kingdom Plantae. Although the Kingdom Protista includes mostly unicellular organisms, I think they belong to Kingdom Protista.

I checked my Campbell bio book and they place it under the "Protists," but closely related to Plantae ancestors.
hope that helps
The discretion between microscopic/macroscopic algae and uni or multicellular makes sense of the situation. I'll keep that in mind but classify everything into Protista as far as the DAT is concerned.

Thanks for looking that up.
 
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Blue-green algae AKA cyanobacteria are part of the Kingdom Monera. Pretty sure all other types are Protists.
 

Avery07

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Blue-green algae AKA cyanobacteria are part of the Kingdom Monera. Pretty sure all other types are Protists.
Monera is no longer considered a Kingdom in mainstream biology. Cyanobacteria is classified in the domain Bacteria.
 
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So I'm making my way through the classification of life right now and I come across a book telling me that Algae-- green, red, and brown are classified in Protista.

Thinking that at least green algae should be in Plantae, I checked Wikipedia which confirmed my thought.

Does anyone know what the correct grouping is on these organisms? I'm assuming that it's in debate and because of that it wouldn't actually appear on the DAT but nonetheless.

Thanks.

Algae are protists.
Blue green algae is Cyanobacteria, classified under Monera.
 

AmpedUp

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Avery is right. Monera is an outdated terminology. There's just three kingdoms now: Bacteria, Archaea, Eukarya. Algae is classified in Archaea (I believe). So...I don't know why the study guide list from the ADA still reflects old terminology. However, I guess it doesn't hurt to know it...
 

dentalWorks

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Avery is right. Monera is an outdated terminology. There's just three kingdoms now: Bacteria, Archaea, Eukarya. Algae is classified in Archaea (I believe). So...I don't know why the study guide list from the ADA still reflects old terminology. However, I guess it doesn't hurt to know it...
algae = protist
 

dentalWorks

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Alanine

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I agree with Protist.

However, Protists are listed in the Kingdom Archaea.
Protists are from Kingdom Protista.
Archae are bacteria..they're prokaryotes..
these are two completely different things.
 

dentalWorks

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Archae are bacteria..they're prokaryotes..
You mean "Archae AND bacterial..they're prokaryotes.."

archae is not bacteria. There are only 3 domains: Eukaryota, Bacteria, and Archae. The only similar relationship between Bacteria and Archae is that they are both prokaryotes.
 

AmpedUp

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:laugh:

forget it!!!

Let's just say they're Protists and call it a day...aggghhh Biology!
 

Alanine

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You mean "Archae AND bacterial..they're prokaryotes.."

archae is not bacteria. There are only 3 domains: Eukaryota, Bacteria, and Archae. The only similar relationship between Bacteria and Archae is that they are both prokaryotes.
you're right.
it confused me a bit because in the class i took that covered all this stuff, they stuck monera and archae together.
 

Avery07

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To settle the situation..

There are three domains:

Archaea
Bacteria
Eukarya


Within Eukarya there are three kingdoms:
Protista
Fungi
Plantae
Animalia


It is obvious now that the algae are found in the kingdom Protista which can be found within the domain Eukarya.

Monera used to be a kingdom within the domain Eukarya but this is no longer the case in mainstream biology.

I think that should settle everything.