G Costanza

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I currently work at a UCC and am wondering if the collective SDN mind can help find a solution to a potential problem. When a student urgently needs our services, we invite them to use our “Walk-In” hours to be seen immediately as opposed to scheduling an intake further out. While it seems like that language accurately describes the type of urgent service, it may be alienating towards students who cannot walk or have a physical disability that make walking difficult. We currently offer "drop-in" groups so that phrase is off the table.

I think the difficult part is using language that 18 year olds can immediately understand while also serving those with different abilities.

Anyone have ideas? What do you use at your clinic?
 

PBCocce

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I currently work at a UCC and am wondering if the collective SDN mind can help find a solution to a potential problem. When a student urgently needs our services, we invite them to use our “Walk-In” hours to be seen immediately as opposed to scheduling an intake further out. While it seems like that language accurately describes the type of urgent service, it may be alienating towards students who cannot walk or have a physical disability that make walking difficult. We currently offer "drop-in" groups so that phrase is off the table.

I think the difficult part is using language that 18 year olds can immediately understand while also serving those with different abilities.

Anyone have ideas? What do you use at your clinic?
I have been a part of a clinic which used "Flexible Hours" to describe non-scheduled visits.
 
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futureapppsy2

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I currently work at a UCC and am wondering if the collective SDN mind can help find a solution to a potential problem. When a student urgently needs our services, we invite them to use our “Walk-In” hours to be seen immediately as opposed to scheduling an intake further out. While it seems like that language accurately describes the type of urgent service, it may be alienating towards students who cannot walk or have a physical disability that make walking difficult. We currently offer "drop-in" groups so that phrase is off the table.

I think the difficult part is using language that 18 year olds can immediately understand while also serving those with different abilities.

Anyone have ideas? What do you use at your clinic?
The general consensus in the disability community is that terms like "walk-in," "see you later," "gotta run," etc, aren't offensive and that it's weirder for people to avoid using them than to use them. I've played with the language a bit when writing fiction, but in day to day life, they don't even stick out to me. I think your terminology is fine, unless your walk-in hours are specific to students in crisis.
 

MCParent

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The general consensus in the disability community is that terms like "walk-in," "see you later," "gotta run," etc, aren't offensive and that it's weirder for people to avoid using them than to use them. I've played with the language a bit when writing fiction, but in day to day life, they don't even stick out to me. I think your terminology is fine, unless your walk-in hours are specific to students in crisis.
I googled "walk-in" and "ableist" and some other variations and nothing came up. I'd be more concerned with how accessible the building is than what the sign on my door says, frankly....
 

MamaPhD

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I think the difficult part is using language that 18 year olds can immediately understand while also serving those with different abilities.
I'm all for making language friendlier to all but not at the cost of obfuscating meaning. That might end up doing more harm than good (if indeed the good is real rather than imagined).

I don't work at a counseling center but I do work in a setting where a great many people use wheelchairs or other mobility devices. I've never heard an objection to the term "walk in." Have you? What does your disability services team suggest? What do your clients with disabilities suggest? It seems you should go to the people you are trying to advocate for as your primary source of information.
 

futureapppsy2

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Additionally, I find the use of "different abilities" to be kind of... weird. I've never known another disabled person or person with a disability to use it, and it seems sort of condescending. Like @MCParent said, the structure of your building is probably going to cause more issues for physically disabled clients than using the word "walk" ever could.
 

erg923

Regional Clinical Officer, Centene Corporation
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I currently work at a UCC and am wondering if the collective SDN mind can help find a solution to a potential problem. When a student urgently needs our services, we invite them to use our “Walk-In” hours to be seen immediately as opposed to scheduling an intake further out. While it seems like that language accurately describes the type of urgent service, it may be alienating towards students who cannot walk or have a physical disability that make walking difficult. We currently offer "drop-in" groups so that phrase is off the table.

I think the difficult part is using language that 18 year olds can immediately understand while also serving those with different abilities.

Anyone have ideas? What do you use at your clinic?
Are you at all worried about how someone who is offended or alienated by such a thing could possibly function in the real world? I am.
 
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I'm going with serious. Erg is kind of SDN's Donald Trump.
The part that mystified me is if gc was actually seriously that upset or was kind of pretending to throw a 12-year old's pillow-throwing temper tantrum.

Related note: has anyone seen The Atlantic's new article about the crippling (sorry, triggering word) political correctness in universities today?
 

erg923

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You ruin the Internet for people.
Ok, well, it wasn't a rhetorical question. Perhaps you thought it was.

I'm really curious how you think this person could maneuver (socially, interpersonally, and especially occupationally), in a world outside your UCC that largely does not even think about, much less cater to, these type of linguistic sensitivities? I mean, my wife (who teaches 4th grade, so it not like shes not warm and aware of sensitivity issues) read your question actually laughed out loud...literally.

I suppose what I'm saying is that functional avoidance of mainstream elements of society seems like a maladaptive choice on the part of the client, and one that should likely be addressed in psychotherapy, not by demanding administration change the sign on your door. That seems rather counter-therapeutic, actually.
 
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WisNeuro

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The part that mystified me is if gc was actually seriously that upset or was kind of pretending to throw a 12-year old's pillow-throwing temper tantrum.

Related note: has anyone seen The Atlantic's new article about the crippling (sorry, triggering word) political correctness in universities today?
I saw it as a half-hearted joke with a tint of seriousness.

As for trigger warnings, I personally find them ridiculous. Especially in college coursework. Part of college is exposure to different ideas and learning to regulate yourself. You're supposed to be developing the emotional maturity to function in the real world. Plus, you should be able to read the syllabus and get a rough idea if something may upset you. I think we need to find a balance of PC with trusting that the vast majority of adults can handle, and should be, mildly uncomfortable at times.
 

MCParent

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Ok, well, it wasn't a rhetorical question. Perhaps you thought it was.

I'm really curious how you think this person could exist and maneuver (socially, interpersonally, and especially occupationally), in a world outside your UCC that largely does not even think about, much less cater to, these type of linguistic sensitivities? I mean, my wife (who teaches 4th grade, so it not like shes not warm and aware of sensitivity issues) read your question actually laughed out loud...literally.

I suppose what I'm saying is that functional avoidance of mainstream elements of society seems like a maladaptive choice on the part of the client, and one that should likely be addressed in psychotherapy, not by demanding administration change the sign on your door. That seems rather counter-therapeutic, actually.
Sometimes the language bits seem less like demanding that we say fireperson instead of fireman (obviously we should be saying the former) and more like demanding that the humane society change it's name to the hupersone society.
 
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Or was he being ironic with the walk away part? There are many other metaphors that rely on hearing, sight, or standing. I have asked several blind patients if they could see what I mean. Have even processed it a bit with them and it was pretty clear that being blind is more of a challenge for them than a metaphor that uses sight. I have also seen that people with disabilities also appreciate the conversation because they feel even more isolated when people dance around the issue. Another able-biased metaphor.
 
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