AMA - Practice startups and early retirement

Discussion in 'Dental' started by TanMan, Mar 19, 2017.

  1. OP
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    TanMan

    TanMan New Member
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    I'm a solo practitioner. I am doing as much as I can by myself so I can keep most of the profit. There are a few reasons why I don't hire additional doctors:
    1. I don't have enough rooms
    2. I can still handle it myself. Why pay someone to do something I can do myself?
    3. They might cannibalize my patients if they choose to setup near me in the future
    4. I don't want to fix or correct anyone's work unless I'm getting paid for it.

    I'm sure there's a lot more reasons besides these, but these are my main points. This is why I don't want to open another office or hire additional doctors. Marginally incremental profit for more work. In a multiple provider office, I have to be HR to the other doctor, pay them a significant chunk that I can do on my own. I am looking into possibly hiring a traveling OS to do 3rd's for me, but I don't know if I want to do any post-ops for them. If I had 20 chairs or more that I could completely fill up, I would consider hiring an associate. Even paying at 30% collections, the profit isn't enough to justify the additional administrative work and risks, and that's why I haven't looked into expanding to 20 chairs. If I could find an associate that would want to work for the long term with me with minimal guidance and take on a similar workload, I'd definitely add another 13 chairs.
     
  2. OP
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    TanMan

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    19 is still a decent score. Sounds like you got a passion for your research and hopefully your professor recognizes that (and writes you a great LoR).

    Hell, I got 18 on my PAT and got accepted to most of the schools.
     
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  3. PreDentTechySon

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    This is really great information. I was trying to think of the best way to maxmimize profit while still keeping the overhead low. Sounds like solo practitioner (or maybe partnership if it's a good fit) is a good route.
     
  4. Cold Front

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    I don't think any dentist in his/her 30's (let alone TanMan) has $15M (post tax) sitting around. If you read few pages back on this thread, TanMan invested his money in high risk high return, non-traditional, investments, which will give him a passive income of $40-50k pre-tax income a month, or $25-30k post-tax a month.

    Anyways, it's doable what TanMan accomplished. He was ambitious, persistent, bold, disciplined, optimistic and above all worked REALLY hard. He is leaving dentistry before he turns 40, that's like Lebron or Messi retiring from their respective careers before their prime. On average, dentists peak their income in their 40's, so he could stand to make more money if he works for another 5-10 years beyond his goal.

    I'm not 40 yet, and plan to keep working at least for another 10 years (before I turn 50), but my passive income by then will probably be double (if not more) as TanMan's. The point is, you just need to have a plan and give everything in effort to meet that goal.
     
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  5. OP
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    TanMan

    TanMan New Member
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    I think I'm approaching my peak a bit early. I don't think my physical capabilities will get any better at 40, or even 50. Based on what I can produce and peak production levels, I think 3.6-4.0 would be my absolute limit (Edit: this is based on my highest production levels, who knows if I can push it further). I don't think that anyone should be persuaded that their peak will be in their 40's. If you have enough patients, you may reach your peak in your 30's.

    Dentists could peak their income in their 40's depending on their practice growth and/or speed. Personally, I don't think I'm getting any faster in procedures and yearly growth is slowing down. One of the points of this thread is retiring early and I don't think I have been explicit in saying this, but growing your office quickly is very important to retire early.

    Anyway, passive income is only one part of the equation. 40-50k is a minimum target for passive income, this does not account for all other sources of income. Passive income grows as your wealth grows, and the goal is to grow my wealth as much as possible (in all forms). If I can make more money going FT into my other businesses without the physical labor of dentistry and flexibility of managing while traveling, then why not? I don't want to wake up into my 50s and realize that I'm old(er) and I used up my youth working instead of enjoying life.
     
  6. Cold Front

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    You did say that you are not physically active type of person in a previous post. That could well explain why your body "feel like" its approaching it's peak early. Truth is, no other means of work or investment will bring you as high return on your investment as dentistry. If you stay physically active, your 40s body would feel like your 30s, but it will require you to do more effort on your body outside the office to keep the body in shape and to produce the same level of dentistry in your 30s. There are millions of people in their 40s and 50s who are more active than people in their 20s amen 30s.

    Also, typically dentists or other professions work harder physically in their 20s and 30s, but work smarter in their 40s and 50s without quitting the profession. I worked my butt off in my 20s and 30s, but I plan to manage my practices more and go to work less in my 40s and 50s, it should be a great work life balance, and still have the time to do other things in life.

    You probably feel burnt out and exhausted by trying to quit by age 40, to the point that it has become a self-fulfilled prophecy for your body. You should enjoy life a little even now, as there is more to it than money.
     
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  7. OP
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    TanMan

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    I can't really agree nor disagree with what you're saying. Our 40 year old body will not recover as well as a 30 year old body, and our 30 year old body does not recover as well as our 20 year old body. I went through what your saying when I hit 30 (thinking I still had the same vitality as I did in my 20's) and I chalked it up to being in denial of my mortality.

    I'd beg to differ that dentistry has the highest return on investment; it's definitely up there, but there's also better and easier ways of making money. Dentistry is a hard way of making a good amount of money. My options are either work less, spread it out longer, or work more, condense what I would normally do in 20-30 years in 8-10 years. There's more to life than working and I don't seek purpose in life through work.

    In terms of burning out, it will happen at some point, but that's where mental stamina comes in. Just need to keep going everyday and its a daily battle with the amount of patients I see. I am stuck in a corner of my own doing, but I don't think I'd have it any other way. I don't understand the logic of slowing down and prolonging the attainment of my financial goals. I'd ask this of other dentists, if you had all the money you needed (or wanted) for the rest of your life, would you continue to work?
     
  8. InformMe123

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    What's the thought on the financial benefit of HPSP military scholarship and staying in for 20 years to get the pension. Seems like it would be same amount of passive income afterwards with less stress.
     
  9. OP
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    TanMan

    TanMan New Member
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    At this point, I don't really care about leaving a legacy. Angel investing (I hate that term), real estate lending, invoice factoring, and other entrepreneurial pursuits.
     
  10. OP
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    TanMan

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    Do you have anymore details regarding HPSP scholarship + pension? What are the requirements for the scholarship? What do you get in return, and what commitments do you have for receiving the scholarship? Also, how much is the monthly pension?
     
  11. 2TH MVR

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    @TanMan .... didn't read the entire thread tldr, but I will say it's refreshing to see someone in dentistry achieving all your financial goals. Nice change of pace from all the doom and gloom threads.
     
  12. Apramana

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  13. pookatooth

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    HPSP is full-ride scholarship to dental school in exchange for same amount of years of military service (read: zero monetary debt). I believe the pension is half of your active duty pay grade for the rest of your life after you retire from the service (assuming 20 years service.) Info coming from an 06 that is about to retire after 30 years. Pension also includes other benefits like health insurance and access to commissary. I think its a relatively risk averse way to secure financial freedom (in stark contrast to your methods) but also an excellent way to serve your country. Different lifestyles for sure. From what I can gather, going the military route is less about the financial gain and more the other things that people find appealing about the military.
     
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    TanMan

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    Net32 is good for items that don't have too short of an expiration date or things that you don't need immediately. Net32 is cheaper since it is grey-market items (reimported) to florida usually. Quality is usually the same or slightly below what you get from domestic vendors. My personal experience is that shipping times can be a little long and expiration dates are short. I prefer Safco, their prices are usually below market average (and lots of coupons, rebates, offers + good free candy) with fast/free shipping. For rare items, Pearson seems to have everything, but their website is annoying. There are certain items that you have to go through patterson or schein, but those are far and few.

    Net32 might be cheaper sometimes, but with a higher volume office where turnaround times/restocking + supply is done at least once a week, the unpredictability of ship dates can be a deal killer (or short expiration dates). Now you may ask, why not just stock a lot more. It's the cost of storage + room availability.
     
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  15. 2TH MVR

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    Everyone's financial priorities are going to differ depending on your individual circumstances. @TanMan chose a path and successfully made it happen. This doesn't mean that his formula is going to work for everyone. Depends on what's important to you at whatever phase of life you're in. I spent my 30's and 40's working hard to raise a family. One daughter is just finishing up college and I have another going to college in a year. I am paying for their college and expenses. 529 plan since the kids were young. Cars for both daughters. Repairing said cars after some predictable fender benders. Spent plenty of money on vacations for the kids. Boats to go to the lake and spend quality time with the family. Keeping the Mrs. happy :). Dealt with my wife's unpredictable major health issue that cost lots of $$$. The point is .... if my circumstances were different and I put all that money into proper investments ... maybe I could retire at 40. As is ... I'm working in my mid 50's and enjoying it ..... so far.
     
  16. OP
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    TanMan

    TanMan New Member
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    That's true... everyone's priorities are different.

    I just got back from vacation, and I think a few of you have asked what I plan to do for retirement... My vacation actually gave me insight as to what retirement should be. I want my retirement to be like a permanent vacation from work. Nothing to worry about, no work to go back to, enjoying life everyday till I die. Retiring to a mediocre life that's not to the level of a nice vacation is extremely depressing to think about. When I imagine someone who's worked for 30+ years, living off a small monthly stipend or getting placed in a nursing home, that seems like a scary and depressing existence.

    However, the daunting task/realization to have a lifetime source of income that will support a nice and luxurious "lifetime vacation" (aka retirement). There's no point in retiring if I'm going to have a mediocre retirement where I still have to worry about my expenses (due to low fixed income).

    On a side note, I hate vacations because it had to end. I hope this gives you guys some insight as to what I mean by retirement. We have to look at the quality of life at retirement; not just the act of retirement. I could retire right now, but the quality of life wouldn't be that great v. if I had a lot more sources of income and wealth.
     
  17. smoothoperator1

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    Long time lurker and practicing GP here.

    Great thread and discussion. Have several questions for you, TanMan. Forgive me if some of these have been previously covered...its been a couple weeks since I read the thread.

    1) About the construction process, how did you go about choosing contractors, assuming this was a new build out? Did you run into any zoning issues?

    2) What duties are your assistants performing? Making temps, taking impressions, etc....expanded functions?? Do you practice assisted hygiene? I read one of Scott Leune's initial threads on Dentaltown and he was a big proponent of this 'idea'.

    3) what CE have you taken thus far?

    4) Are you doing RCT/BU/crown in one appointment? Thought I saw this earlier in the thread.

    5) How did you perform demographic analysis before you opened doors? I know you mentioned determining what type of dentist/office you would like to be first and that you received some data from the television/media stations used for marketing. What led you to choose your specific area in Texas? What other resources did you use to gather data to make your decision?

    6) So you mentioned you like to keep it simple and tend to stray away from certain procedures. What happens with patients that need dentures, have bombed out dentition, candidates for full-mouth rehab or difficult implant cases? Are there certain docs you refer these patients to?

    That's all I have for now. I'm sure I'll have additional questions later. Thanks in advance!
     
  18. OP
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    TanMan

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    1. Contractors... Choose a general contractor with a positive reputation. There are three general qualities, price, quality, and/or speed. When I first started, my first priorities were price/speed, but making it NOT look like a dental office. Landlords who care about the leasehold improvements usually know who's going to do good work on their property. In my case, my landlord was also a developer, so mine was developed nearly at cost. No zoning problems. As I mentioned before, it's better to have someone local who is well known within the building inspectors so you can get things approved quickly.

    2. Texas is limited on what assistants can do. Anything and everything that can be delegated legally to assistants are delegated. My time is worth more than theirs. Assisted hygiene definitely makes sense, but it depends on how your workflow goes. Keeping rounded numbers (hypothetical), if you charge 100USD for a prophy and your hygienist can do 2 unassisted, and 3 assisted, you just increased your prophy production by 50% for the price of an assistant's hour (which is worth less than a prophy). However, I tend to balance the hygiene assistants in getting patients in and out, taking radiographs, walking patients out. Pretty much priority is all the auxiliary functions, secondary function is assist the hygienist.

    3. The ones I can remember are Level 1/2 oral sedation, LANAP, pinhole, just did an implant course since I'm trying to develop an streamlined implant procedural system that can be implemented in my office (still in the works). The rest of the CE's I did were just to meet licensure requirements. I find it hard to do CE's that don't take away my weekends unless my return of investment is worth taking time off. I'm not going to be one of those dentists that brag about going to so and so institute, etc... I think earlier in my posts, I mentioned not doing implants, but now that I've cut out underperforming procedures, I'll start on implants and see how that goes.

    4. Single appointment RCT/BU/Crown. Possible with the CEREC. How to justify to patients? You only have to go through this once unlike other places where you might have to go through it 2-3+ appts. Most ppl opt to one longer appt.

    5. I worked in the area for a little bit and found that there's a deficiency in PPO/FFS offices since everyone and their mom was opening a medicaid mill. I prefer to look at it from a supply/demand side, but dentistry is not dentistry. There's medicaid dentistry, FFS/PPO dentistry, HMO dentistry; different models revolve around different demographics. One thing I learned is that in a medicaid heavy population, a large support staff population exists in the form of healthcare and teachers. Some of the research included what kind of PPO's the population had (were they any good - do they pay, and how much?), how hard is it to get an appointment in the area (if it takes too long, people want it NOW), is there an unmet market need in the region (convenient hours), etc... I'll try and go into more detail, my mind is usually fragmented and you'll probably get fragmented answers from me. I prefer specific questions, since I tend to just ramble on what comes to mind - that may not necessarily be a complete and thorough answer. Somewhere on these posts, I may have discussed what to look for in demographics.

    6. If they need dentures, full mouth rehab, difficult patients, bombed out dentition. I refer them out. I don't even touch them, as it's not fair to the referred dentist (they should get the good and the bad), and I don't want to get involved. Only time I may get involved is if they are in pain. I'll take care of what gets them out of pain and refer them out. Production/hour drops significantly in these cases. Implants, I'm looking to implementing a nearly idiot-proof system to these, so I'll be placing implants pretty soon. I'm not planning to do all on 4/5/6's; If it requires more extensive procedures, I'll refer to an oral surgeon. You may have noticed I took sedation courses, but I don't do sedation as it does not work with the office workflow and attracts the wrong kind of patients.

    I screen my specialists. They need to do high quality work and be nice to the patients. If the quality is bad, I stop referring. If my patients complain about how rude or unprofessional a specialist is/was, then I stop referring. I usually monitor patient feedback to the specialists. If it's a single problematic patient that I know loves to complain, then I don't really take note of it, but if its multiple problematic accounts, then I stop referring.
     
  19. 2TH MVR

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    re: contractors:

    1. reputable dental contractor/architect
    2. contractor holds insurance bond for entire work in case he goes under. You need a copy of this bond and the amount.
    3. get to know the sub-contractors. Make sure they are being paid by the general. Have them contact you immediately if the general falls behind in paying them.
    4. Usually the full lein releases are given to you at the END of the project. This is bad. Request partial lein releases on EVERY payment made to the general. Your payments will be itemized and paid out to the subs. Ask for partial lein releases either from the general or the subs. THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT. TRUST ME. No partial lein releases .... then no more payments. Generals often have a number of projects going and they will shuffle YOUR money between the projects.

    Realize that the general is just the middle player. You have sub-contractors that actually perform the work and YOU. If the general files bankrupcy or doesn't pay the subs, or skips town....the subs will go after YOU. If you do not pay them .... they hold the leins on a portion of the property.
     
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  20. InformMe123

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    What's your thoughts on FFS? What does it take to have a successful FFS practice? Does this mean being a super GP and being really good clinically?
     
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  21. OP
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    TanMan

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    FFS can be viable, although a bit slower model of growth. It's definitely viable, but I see different types of FFS patients. Requisite is that they need a good amount of disposable income as they tend to have higher out of pocket expenses than their PPO counterparts. You can be an out-of-network provider who can assist the patient in filing insurance paperwork but bill at your office fee schedule.

    Think about why someone would want to pay more. There has to be a reason that patients are willing to pay more out of pocket, whether it is because they don't have insurance or willing to go out of network. For those that don't have insurance, you can go the low end of FFS (which I don't hear very often) or the high end of FFS (which can be more common). Low end FFS makes no sense, since you might as well accept the fee schedules while remaining in-network. High end FFS requires incentives for those that don't have insurance or offer something to those with PPO insurance willing to go out of network.

    Now, as I mentioned before, you have price, quality, and convenience as primary motivating factors. Price, I don't think is a viable business model. Quality is perceived - you can compete on perceived quality by services offered and technology. This is where the superGP model comes in. However, the question would be whether people are willing to pay for quality in your region. Quality is also perceived in time spent with the patient. If you take too long, you may appear incompetent or thorough (unprofitable in both respects), if you are too fast, you may seem like you're not spending enough time with the patient. Long story short, there's many factors in perceived quality, and a quick jumpstart to increasing perceived quality is buying/soliciting bulk google/yelp reviews and along with a showcase of your technological investments. Not exactly ethical, but it's essentially pay to win unfortunately. The one danger of basing your practice off reviews is that you tend to attract patients who tend to be pickier, ask more questions, and think they know more from googling "dentistry".

    Another model is through convenience - I'm not sure if people would pay more for convenience, but convenience can be perceived in a few ways. First is hours and availability. Are you available when other dentists are not available? Second has to do with a superGP or GP with specialists onboard. Does the patient have to go anywhere else, or can they get everything done in one office. Ties back into looking like you have the best office.

    Having a successful FFS practice ties into location, whether your demographics are not too price sensitive, and whether you can cater to their perceptions of quality and convenience. You don't necessarily have to be a super GP, you could be a GP with specialists in your office. You also don't have to be good clinically. The most successful dentists are not the best dentists. As long as your work looks acceptable, doesn't fall apart, and doesn't hurt, that's good enough for most people. Our criterias for good treatment are not necessarily the patient's criterias of perceived "good treatment"
     
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  22. sobertiger

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    Thank you for doing this TanMan. Amazing!
     
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  23. doktorinprogres

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    Hi TanMan,

    Is the primary difference between not wanting to mentor an associate vs being fairly free with your advice on here time?

    Can you delve a little bit more into your incentive structure for employees. Do you keep track of production and give them dollar amounts? Do they know what percentage they have the ability to achieve based on total office production numbers. Do they know the total office production numbers? Is there a differential; Hygienist can achieve a higher percentage than front office or DA?

    You clearly have a good staff but I wonder if someone were trying to replicate and gave too much info if they would start to resent just how much the doc was taking home

    Thank you very much for this thread and your willingness to answer silly questions as well as more practical ones. I think its great you entertained some philosophical questions and were honest even when they were semi-attacking of your perspective. I also have not found anything this detailed, comprehensive, and straightforward consolidated into one place (have to sift through dentaltown to get this much detail usually)
     
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  24. OP
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    TanMan

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    If the associate is willing to work for cheap until they are willing to buy my office, I may consider mentoring. I'm pretty free about advice because I don't see any consequence in doing so. I don't think what I do is necessarily a trade secret, it's just common sense.

    If they meet my threshold for the month, they get 2-2.5% divided among all the dental assistants. If one of the teams gets a major write up, I'll slash their bonus and team (i.e hygiene, ops, front, or billing team) by 1/3. If they don't meet the threshold, no one gets a bonus. Hygienists are on a totally different pay structure. Guaranteed hourly with a percentage on certain procedures. This motivates them to present and sell procedures.

    My staff knows how much the office makes, they also know that they can't get a better deal in most other places. Most of my employees have gone from having nothing to having new cars, home ownership, getting an education, going to company vacations that normally would not be available to DA's, etc... They see me drive my cars, have hosted parties at my house, taken them out to open bar restaurants (although most of the restaurants actually stop serving us alcohol after they think we had too much)... so they know how much I have and take home. I'm also not greedy when it comes to money. If they need money for an emergency or other things, I'll let them borrow money. If they need a ride or help with anything, we all help each other (myself included). It's like a family. There are some things that I have not disclosed to them. I don't think I'll be having children, and even if I do, I may just leave my fortune to everyone who made it possible (my staff).

    If you show that you care for your staff, they will take care of you. Small gestures such as company vacations (things they wouldn't be able to experience on their own) or student loan repayment goes a long way to developing loyalty.
     
  25. percyeye

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    I'm in a different field than Dentistry but it is always awesome to read about other people doing awesome things clinically different than all the others. Thanks for great read.

    Side note. Anyone interested in another similar great read there is a thread pinned under the Plastic Surgery Thread about a guy who started his very own clinic right out of residency.
     
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  26. percyeye

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    TanMan

    Any new updates or changes going on? Any new investing going on?

    This was one of my favorite threads to read through so just checking in.
     
  27. OP
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    TanMan

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    So far, not much has changed on the dental side. Stable dental office production levels. Businesses are finally maturing, able to draw a good amount of passive income now. Still on track for 50k+/month in passive income by next year. Tasks for this year is to payoff my primary residence, move company HQ to Dallas, and reevaluate everything next year.
     
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  28. studentdent00

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    still no plans for a family and kids?
     
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    TanMan

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    No kids yet, I have too much to do still. Socially, I think we are told that children bring fulfillment into parent's lives. However, I think that seems to be the exception more than the rule. A lot of my colleagues and friends that I talk to admit that they regret having kids, and I can see that they are a prisoner within their own lives, with crushed aspirations due to the obligations that are weighing them down.

    Maybe get married in a year or two.
     
  30. BluntForceTrauma

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    Bring fulfillment with the right mentality. The fact that you have "a lot" of colleagues and friends that say they regret it shows they don't have (and probably never had) the mentality that is not about you anymore.
     
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  31. BluntForceTrauma

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    I also desire not to derail thy thread. So that's the only comment I'll make on the subject.
     
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  32. 2TH MVR

    2TH MVR Orthodontist
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    Ouch. I agree that having children is a HUGE responsibility .... both in time and financial. There are a few times during stressful child-parent interactions that I envy my friends who chose not to have children. Without children .... I would have been a very wealthy man. I would be driving a new Ferrari every three years, boats, beach condos, exotic vacations, etc. etc. That list could go on and on.

    But ... I have NO REGRETS for having two wonderful daughters in my life. They ARE MY LIFE. As you get older ... you realize that your true task in life is to invest in your children's lives and pass on your memory and legacy through your children. My wife and I cannot wait for grandchildren.

    I actually feel sorry for those couples without children. I'm friends with a couple who did not want children. They talk all the time about their vacations, new home, cars, going out, etc. etc. etc. It's the SAME theme every time I talk to them. Seems so shallow and self serving.

    Well ... my oldest daughter is getting married. My wife and I are happy that we will get our grandkids soon.

    People choose to live their lives as they want. No right or wrong choices.
     
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  33. OP
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    TanMan

    TanMan New Member
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    I think you hit it right on the nail. Reflecting at those that regret v. those that have no regrets, age and maturity definitely play a role. Those that have the same/similar response as @2TH MVR are people who are more stable, had children when they were older, and retrospectively would not give up their current life with children. Whereas the ones that have regrets tend to be younger or had an abrupt change in their current lifestyle. You may be right that their life revolved around themselves and are now having to adapt to having another human depend on them. Two most recent examples are my dental assistants. Two of them were going to get abortions, one of my hygienists with strong religious convictions convinced them otherwise, and now express regret on going through with their decision. Only time will tell whether their regrets will turn into joy and/or acceptance.

    Learning and observing other people's lives, I think the lesson would be to have children when you're ready. Otherwise, children put a strain on your relationships and lifestyle. Especially special needs children. I've seen a lot of divorces that result from having a special needs child.

    When you look at it that way, I guess it is superficial. As I said before, when I'm bored with what a child-free life has to offer, maybe I'll have kids.
     
  34. wengerout

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    Is this between two practices with you as the only provider?
     
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  35. OP
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    TanMan

    TanMan New Member
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    One practice, one doctor.
     
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  36. OP
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    TanMan

    TanMan New Member
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    Recently, I had a chat with an old friend regarding marriage. He told me, don't get married, your sex life will go down the tubes. Said the same thing about having kids. Is there any truth to this? I realize that asking this in my own AMA thread is not really in the spirit of asking me anything, but I figure it's an important question to me and a subset of readers of this AMA.
     
  37. 2TH MVR

    2TH MVR Orthodontist
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    Haha. I cannot comment on the sex life. That might be outside the scope of SDN. 1st off .... I don't want to come off as self righteous. People's lives and how they choose to live their lives is their choice. I'm as guilty as anyone when it comes to possessions. I like nice things. I like to go on nice vacations. Yes .... being married and having kids is a major financial burden. No controversy there. My oldest daughter is getting married and my youngest daughter is starting college. $$$$$$$$$. But I wouldn't have it any other way.

    I guess when you're on your death bed .... you'll know if you made the right decision and no regrets.
     
  38. CHRG

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    How are you preparing for the looming financial crisis?
    How do you avoid burn-out with your excessive schedule?
    How do you attract a large number of patients?
     
  39. OP
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    TanMan

    TanMan New Member
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    1. Cash/cash equivalents, guns and lots of ammo. Hopefully when it comes crashing down and a credit crunch occurs , I should be able to strike at any opportunity that comes my way. Maybe coupled with a few natural disasters, I can snap up assets for relatively cheap. Looking to diversify in international markets such as the Philippines, Turkey, and Brazil.
    2. A night's fun and/or sleep is enough to wipe the slate clean for the next day.
    3. Lots of consistent advertising.
     
  40. 2TH MVR

    2TH MVR Orthodontist
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    images.jpg
     
  41. Sanducan

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    This is correct, all my friends who got married, sex lives have gone down the tubes. It’s true, and everyone knows it. Why do you think there are so many affairs and mistresses, which ends with a lot of men splitting half their assets? (Amazon rings a bell) As men, we are driven by sex and that’s just biology, women are not the same, so when they get married and comfortable, guess what?? All my married friends say the same thing. Majority of men in power stay married, and then hire you know what in secret, it’s the truth, so let’s not sugar coat it just because it’s sdn..
     
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    #441 Sanducan, Feb 11, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2019
  42. setdoc7

    Dentist Verified Expert 10+ Year Member

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    I have done side businesses for years, and yes it is possible. Tan Man has taken it to a whole other level, which on the surface appears extreme, but may be the future if it works. Investing is tricky, and a side hustle is just that, not encompassing your full attention. But there is no substitute for passive income. With no kids and no wife, you have it pretty easy. Raising three kids takes away some of that 45%.
     

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