AMCAS primary mistake. Withdraw?

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mounst

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Hi all. I turned in my primary for verification yesterday and I just noticed that one of my activity descriptions didn’t save. The job, supervisor, hours and all are present but not the description. I am unsure why it didn’t save (though I accept that it was likely a blunder on my part).

M question is, should I go ahead and withdraw? Or keep my application and explain in secondaries? Any advice would be helpful, and many thanks in advance.

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i would not recommend withdrawing, maybe you can let the schools know about what happened through email
 
Have you called AAMC and begged yet? Besides withdrawing, that’s really your only other option at this point, which is unfortunate since you’re submitting early and presumably doing everything else right.

It’s a gamble, but you could submit an email along your secondaries to schools explaining the situation and hope that they attach it to your file. But it’s not necessarily the best look and might get you screened out at places you otherwise would have had a shot at.
 
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Hi all. I turned in my primary for verification yesterday and I just noticed that one of my activity descriptions didn’t save. The job, supervisor, hours and all are present but not the description. I am unsure why it didn’t save (though I accept that it was likely a blunder on my part).

M question is, should I go ahead and withdraw? Or keep my application and explain in secondaries? Any advice would be helpful, and many thanks in advance.
It's a rookie mistake and it's the reason we stress repeated proofreading of the application, best by printing it out so blank spots like this become more obvious.

Do not withdraw your application. If you withdraw it, you cannot submit another AMCAS application until 2025.
Do not make a big deal of it by pointing out the error to all your schools.

What will happen? Whoever is reading it will see there is no description, shrug and think "Hmm, that was a careless mistake", and move on to read the rest of your application.

What else will happen? You will be very careful to proofread your secondary essays, won't you?
 
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Have you called AAMC and begged yet? Besides withdrawing, that’s really your only other option at this point, which is unfortunate since you’re submitting early and presumably doing everything else right.

It’s a gamble, but you could submit an email along your secondaries to schools explaining the situation and hope that they attach it to your file. But it’s not necessarily the best look and might get you screened out at places you otherwise would have had a shot at.
AAMC will not change essays or activities for you after submission, so it is not worth wasting time doing this.
AAMC will fix up any courses entered in the wrong term or category.
I disagree with @everythingisonfire's advice on both points here
 
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I just noticed that one of my activity descriptions didn’t save... should I go ahead and withdraw? Or keep my application and explain in secondaries? Any advice would be helpful, and many thanks in advance.
As @wysdoc said, do NOT withdraw. If you withdraw, you cannot resubmit your application. While a missing essay is far from ideal, it is also not a deal breaker.

As an example, a couple cycles ago, one of our accepted students forgot to paste BOTH essays for one of their most meaningful activities. It was mentioned in passing during deliberations, but the rest of their application compensated for it. They got in and were one of our more highly rated applicants (this was at a T20 school).

If I was in your situation, I would supply the schools with the missing essay via email. My thought process is that the missing essay will be noticeable, and supplying the missing essay will at least share your positive attributes from that experience. Finish your email with a very brief apology for the oversight; just one sentence is sufficient. Just my thoughts
 
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