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American Board of Internal Medicine - Board Pass rates

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Fermi

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Jattdoc said:
I don't know if its been mentioned before...but as i'm looking up what programs to apply too, i think this list is somewhat useful....it gives you some idea about how the programs prepared their residents...check it out

http://www.abim.org/passrate/passindex.htm

:thumbup:

This is a great resource. Thanks :thumbup:
 

angel80

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dragonfly99

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Very interesting.
I think the board pass rate represents some composite of the smarts+test taking ability of the residents who are there, +/- the teaching that goes on. It's interesting to see that some lesser known programs have 100% board pass rates, while even at the "famous name" places, they have a couple people failing the boards every 2-3 years. I would personally avoid any program that doesn't have a pass rate in the 90's, hopefully the mid 90's or better...it suggests some badness if it is lower...either bad teaching, no time to study, or weaker house staff.
 

DrWBD

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The board pass rate should always be interpreted cautiously as an indicator of IM program quality.

In IM residency programs with a significant number of FMGs who were already physicians in their country of origin, the pass rate can be very high. There are many NYC hospitals on the list that are known FMG factories with 100% or close to 100% pass rates.

Many of the super-intense NYC programs simply don't allow for a lot of study time, and a few of their graduates mistakenly assume they can pass with minimal studying.

Finally, many program directors used to game the system by not "signing off" on certain housestaff to take the IM boards if they feel there is a good chance they won't pass (this was the case when I was a student and resident, but I'm not sure if this still occurs).
 

dragonfly99

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I don't remember needing permission of my program director to take the boards...well, I do think they have to certify that you finished the program, but that's it. That is truly dastardly if they are trying to keep folks from taking the boards, b/c without passing them you can't get certain jobs.
 

Gastrapathy

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I don't remember needing permission of my program director to take the boards...well, I do think they have to certify that you finished the program, but that's it. That is truly dastardly if they are trying to keep folks from taking the boards, b/c without passing them you can't get certain jobs.

I'm pretty sure you did need permission to take boards, in a sense. You had to have passed the residency to be eligible and they have to sign off that you are competent. I've never seen anyone not passed for fear of this, though.
 

dragonfly99

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OK, you're right - they have to sign off that you've finished residency and/or are going to finish.
So the only way they could ultimately stop someone from sitting for boards would be to not let the person finish residency. At most, the PD could delay the person taking the boards for 1 year (i.e. not let them sign up by the March deadline in spring of 3rd year). Otherwise the only way he could stop you from taking it the next year would be to fail you for 3rd year...
 

tibor75

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Programs likely care more about their "percentage who graduate" rate than their board pass rate. so I doubt programs fail people just so they don't fail the boards - that won't help their reputation one bit.

If you finish residency, there is absolutely no way you cannot take the boards no matter what your PD says.

And the bottom line anyway is that you should take it right after residnecy - waiting for a year won't help as your private practice job won't leave much time to study.
 

zeloc

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These averages are only for the past 3 years also, so small programs that have 100% pass rate may not actually be as good as it seems. They really should include at least 5 years of data.
 
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