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alaaz

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hello , i am in DCEM1 right now ( 3 years in medical school )
the problem for me that i can't memorize , after like 10 minutes after memorization i just forget what i have learned and i'm thinking of giving anki a try this year and i'm affraid that it will consume all my time , i have a girlfriend and go occasionally with my friends to hang out
i was able to pass first year and second year but i was never able like to have great grades i want to be a top student and my grades to rise i am tired of going to every exam with the constant thought that i am going to fail and this year i was so close to failure but i manage to did it


how much time do you do anki each day ???
 

Rumor13

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How much time it will take you depends on several factors:

1. Do you have a pre-made deck? If so, is it a high quality or average deck?
2. Are you making your own cards?
3. If making your own, how many and how thorough do you plan to make them?
4. Have flash cards worked for you in the past? (Anki will inherently take much longer for someone who doesn't learn that well from flash cards versus someone who soaks up flash card info like a sponge)

Personally, I'm an anki fanatic, but that's because it's worth the time to make my own cards because it work for me. I know a lot of people that tried making their own cards just couldn't keep up with making cards and actually having time to study and review them, and others who Anki helped, but it wasn't great so it wasn't worth their time to make their own, but worth it to use someone else's cards.

The way I do it is I make cards as I go through a set of slides and/or syllabus for the first time. I basically consider it the same as making an outline but in flash card format. I'd say on average, it takes me a full 1-1.5 hours to convert one lecture to cards with an average of 60 cards per lecture, but I make extremely expansive, detailed decks; I make them comprehensive enough that you could learn the material without ever looking at the slides or syllabus they came from (and I only do that because I need the active attention/learning that flash cards force you to do vs. passively reading notes/slides). Obviously some lectures are easier than others. I spend the first half of my day making new cards and looking at new material for that day, and I spend the second half of my day doing old cards that I've already made. I review ~200-300 old cards a day, give or take, over the course of maybe 3-4 hours, but I have Anki repeat cards until I know them cold so a lot of times I see cards with concepts that aren't quite sticking multiple times per day over multiple days. As tests get closer and I don't have new decks to make, I can do anywhere from 500-900 cards in a day (depends on the subject and how diligent I was with my daily card reviews). But again, I thrive on the active learning and the constant changing of pace. Some of my friends think I'm insane for doing that many in one day, especially considering how thorough my cards are. But hey, if it works, don't try and fix it, haha.

Now, I'm a bit of an oddball because of how I basically convert lectures to anki and then hit cards over and over. That's why it takes me so long. If you on the other hand are only going to selectively make cards only for the things you can't remember, it will take you far less time to make them. And if you can get your hands on pre-made decks either from others or potentially online, that will take the least amount of time (assuming the cards are written well), but there's also no guarantee that things you need the cards for most will be incorporated in that deck. So there's no short answer really. Depending on what you want to get out of it and your resources, Anki can eat hours upon hours of your time, or take up only a small fraction of it.
 
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Mr. Beefy Lion

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How much time it will take you depends on several factors:

1. Do you have a pre-made deck? If so, is it a high quality or average deck?
2. Are you making your own cards?
3. If making your own, how many and how thorough do you plan to make them?
4. Have flash cards worked for you in the past? (Anki will inherently take much longer for someone who doesn't learn that well from flash cards versus someone who soaks up flash card info like a sponge)

Personally, I'm an anki fanatic, but that's because it's worth the time to make my own cards because it work for me. I know a lot of people that tried making their own cards just couldn't keep up with making cards and actually having time to study and review them, and others who Anki helped, but it wasn't great so it wasn't worth their time to make their own, but worth it to use someone else's cards.

The way I do it is I make cards as I go through a set of slides and/or syllabus for the first time. I basically consider it the same as making an outline but in flash card format. I'd say on average, it takes me a full 1-1.5 hours to convert one lecture to cards with an average of 60 cards per lecture, but I make extremely expansive, detailed decks; I make them comprehensive enough that you could learn the material without ever looking at the slides or syllabus they came from (and I only do that because I need the active attention/learning that flash cards force you to do vs. passively reading notes/slides). Obviously some lectures are easier than others. I spend the first half of my day making new cards and looking at new material for that day, and I spend the second half of my day doing old cards that I've already made. I review ~200-300 old cards a day, give or take, over the course of maybe 3-4 hours, but I have Anki repeat cards until I know them cold so a lot of times I see cards with concepts that aren't quite sticking multiple times per day over multiple days. As tests get closer and I don't have new decks to make, I can do anywhere from 500-900 cards in a day (depends on the subject and how diligent I was with my daily card reviews). But again, I thrive on the active learning and the constant changing of pace. Some of my friends think I'm insane for doing that many in one day, especially considering how thorough my cards are. But hey, if it works, don't try and fix it, haha.

Now, I'm a bit of an oddball because of how I basically convert lectures to anki and then hit cards over and over. That's why it takes me so long. If you on the other hand are only going to selectively make cards only for the things you can't remember, it will take you far less time to make them. And if you can get your hands on pre-made decks either from others or potentially online, that will take the least amount of time (assuming the cards are written well), but there's also no guarantee that things you need the cards for most will be incorporated in that deck. So there's no short answer really. Depending on what you want to get out of it and your resources, Anki can eat hours upon hours of your time, or take up only a small fraction of it.
I'm an incoming M1 and have been trying to learn anki a little bit this summer in case that's how I decide I want to study. So just to be clear, you 100% convert lectures into anki cards and then solely study your cards?

If so, that's how I was going to try to study even though I have always been a "read and re write the PowerPoint" student. Do you have any tips for making anki cards that you wish you knew when you first started? Thanks
 

alaaz

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i have 2 lectures per day and i am a quickly typer i used pc since i was 5 , i have to go to the hospital at morning and go to lectures at evening so that make me like 4-5 hours to study per day , what i want to use anki is to be a top student and have a good knowledge when i do the residency test and get a good speciality , like cardiologist or ophtalmologist , i don't want to end up a biophysics teacher hahaha
 
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Rumor13

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I'm an incoming M1 and have been trying to learn anki a little bit this summer in case that's how I decide I want to study. So just to be clear, you 100% convert lectures into anki cards and then solely study your cards?

If so, that's how I was going to try to study even though I have always been a "read and re write the PowerPoint" student. Do you have any tips for making anki cards that you wish you knew when you first started? Thanks

Quick tips I learned along the way:

- don't ask more than one thing per card
- vary the cards between open ended, cloze and multi-cloze, and true/false
- give yourself hints, i.e. if the answer has 5 parts like "what are the branches of artery X", put that there are 5 somewhere in the front. It will help you name them all and you won't end up re-doing a card 40x just because you keep forgetting there are 5 answers and only name 4 each time
- incorporate pictures wherever possible in the answer (text and visual cues promote retention far above text alone)
- don't make cards for things you already know (your subconscious will do it I promise, I have literally come across cards in my own decks a week after like "what is the stomach?" and I'm just like really...)
 
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psychhopefull2016

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Basically all my study time year 1-2 was flash cards (I'm a paper card maker, not an anki person because the physical act of writing helps me learn) and I would dedicate 2-3 hours a day to making and learning my cards. I still go out with my friends and am married so it is very doable. I get average to above average grades. (Probably top half the class but not top quarter)
 

Humble Sloth

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How much time it will take you depends on several factors:

1. Do you have a pre-made deck? If so, is it a high quality or average deck?
2. Are you making your own cards?
3. If making your own, how many and how thorough do you plan to make them?
4. Have flash cards worked for you in the past? (Anki will inherently take much longer for someone who doesn't learn that well from flash cards versus someone who soaks up flash card info like a sponge)

Personally, I'm an anki fanatic, but that's because it's worth the time to make my own cards because it work for me. I know a lot of people that tried making their own cards just couldn't keep up with making cards and actually having time to study and review them, and others who Anki helped, but it wasn't great so it wasn't worth their time to make their own, but worth it to use someone else's cards.

The way I do it is I make cards as I go through a set of slides and/or syllabus for the first time. I basically consider it the same as making an outline but in flash card format. I'd say on average, it takes me a full 1-1.5 hours to convert one lecture to cards with an average of 60 cards per lecture, but I make extremely expansive, detailed decks; I make them comprehensive enough that you could learn the material without ever looking at the slides or syllabus they came from (and I only do that because I need the active attention/learning that flash cards force you to do vs. passively reading notes/slides). Obviously some lectures are easier than others. I spend the first half of my day making new cards and looking at new material for that day, and I spend the second half of my day doing old cards that I've already made. I review ~200-300 old cards a day, give or take, over the course of maybe 3-4 hours, but I have Anki repeat cards until I know them cold so a lot of times I see cards with concepts that aren't quite sticking multiple times per day over multiple days. As tests get closer and I don't have new decks to make, I can do anywhere from 500-900 cards in a day (depends on the subject and how diligent I was with my daily card reviews). But again, I thrive on the active learning and the constant changing of pace. Some of my friends think I'm insane for doing that many in one day, especially considering how thorough my cards are. But hey, if it works, don't try and fix it, haha.

Now, I'm a bit of an oddball because of how I basically convert lectures to anki and then hit cards over and over. That's why it takes me so long. If you on the other hand are only going to selectively make cards only for the things you can't remember, it will take you far less time to make them. And if you can get your hands on pre-made decks either from others or potentially online, that will take the least amount of time (assuming the cards are written well), but there's also no guarantee that things you need the cards for most will be incorporated in that deck. So there's no short answer really. Depending on what you want to get out of it and your resources, Anki can eat hours upon hours of your time, or take up only a small fraction of it.

I always make my own Anki decks because i don't trust other people's decks. Anki is great because it forces to to learn and really tests if you know the material or not.
 

Rumor13

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I always make my own Anki decks because i don't trust other people's decks. Anki is great because it forces to to learn and really tests if you know the material or not.

That is exactly why I do it. My school has a stellar deck for each class that is passed down from year to year, but it isnt' 100% comprehensive (albeit has >80% of the material and it has saved my ass for things like microanatomy slides) and for me, beyond just doing the cards, going through the content once very slowly and deeply to make my cards gives me a good feel of the material and a solid foundation for me to then build on when I review my cards.

Plus, nothing can beat cards written for you by you as long as you have time to actually study them once they're made. I purposely write and structure my cards in ways that work most efficiently for my brain. Like I said, I'm extremely guilty of passive reading/listening if I'm not that interested in what I'm studying and I don't force to actively absorb and understand, which as you said, flash cards 100% do.
 
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alaaz

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i'm just affraid of time , i have many friends and girlfriend and hang out a lot , i'm affraid that anki will consume all my time
 

Rumor13

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i'm just affraid of time , i have many friends and girlfriend and hang out a lot , i'm affraid that anki will consume all my time

It will only consume as much time as you decide to put into it. It's not like once you start doing flash cards you can't get up, walk away and do whatever you want. I do that literally all the time. But it's all priorities. Unless you're innately a genius, top marks and being a great med student, and not just average, requires a lot more time and effort in one form or another. There's no way around it.
 

kmp0410

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i'm just affraid of time , i have many friends and girlfriend and hang out a lot , i'm affraid that anki will consume all my time

Well you are going to be studying regardless. If you want to make better grades you will probably have to study more. Med school is consuming your time, not anki. Though I actually found myself with more time after I started using Anki due to studying more efficiently. I think most will find this true.
 
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alaaz

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Well you are going to be studying regardless. If you want to make better grades you will probably have to study more. Med school is consuming your time, not anki. Though I actually found myself with more time after I started using Anki due to studying more efficiently. I think most will find this true.
i mean how much do you study per day ???
 

kmp0410

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i mean how much do you study per day ???

I don't know. It changes depending on whats going on, the difficulty of the material, etc. I will say I had plenty of free time in 1st year.

But its irrelevant. You have to learn the material, I think Anki is a tool to do this most efficiently. You still decide how much time you want to spend studying. But overall I spent less time while using Anki than when not using it. Certainly less stressed leading to tests. But as said, med school and the amount of material is what is going to command your time...anki is just a tool.
 

LifeB4Death

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Now, I'm a bit of an oddball because of how I basically convert lectures to anki and then hit cards over and over. That's why it takes me so long. If you on the other hand are only going to selectively make cards only for the things you can't remember, it will take you far less time to make them. And if you can get your hands on pre-made decks either from others or potentially online, that will take the least amount of time (assuming the cards are written well), but there's also no guarantee that things you need the cards for most will be incorporated in that deck. So there's no short answer really. Depending on what you want to get out of it and your resources, Anki can eat hours upon hours of your time, or take up only a small fraction of it.

Out of curiosity, how do you convert your lectures into Anki? Do you mean you just copy/paste your slides into Anki or something? If so, how do you make that work for you? If not, can you give me an idea of what you did? I used to use Anki but then converted to Cram but I don't like their mobile app that much or the fact that I always need an Internet connection (I shut mine off when I'm studying).
 

piii

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Out of curiosity, how do you convert your lectures into Anki? Do you mean you just copy/paste your slides into Anki or something? If so, how do you make that work for you? If not, can you give me an idea of what you did? I used to use Anki but then converted to Cram but I don't like their mobile app that much or the fact that I always need an Internet connection (I shut mine off when I'm studying).
Do some searches. You can copy direct facts from slides or typing and do cloze deletions of a critical word. You can use the Image Occlusion add on to load a diagram or table that you screen shot, then block out names and have Anki cards that ask you to identify what's blocked out. You can make front and back reversible cards, multiple choice, true and false, it's infinite. Just search for how to use Anki on this site and Reddit. The point is to make really simply question answer, quiz like flash cards.
 

Foot Fetish

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i'm just affraid of time , i have many friends and girlfriend and hang out a lot , i'm affraid that anki will consume all my time

Losing mentality right here.

You have your whole life to hang out with friends and your girl, but you only have one shot to crush medical school and set yourself up for life.

No pain, no gain.
 
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