nature4me

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Hi dear colleagues
I'm a GP and I can't decide about my future medical specialty;
BECAUSE I AM AN INTP!
Is there any INTP type anesthesiologist here who is happy and satisfied with his/her career?

regards
 

Gern Blansten

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I am close to it.
I am ISTP
I assume you are referring to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.
I am happy and satisfied with my career.
 

omniatlas

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I took a test online and I came out to be ESTJ (slightly extroverted).

According to the Ultimate Guide for Choosing a Medical Specialty, gas falls under Introverted–Sensing–Feeling– Perceptive (ISFP).

I took the medical specialty aptitude test at http://www.med-ed.virginia.edu/specialties/

And gas came out at the top (yah) --

Rank Specialty Score
1 general surgery 43
2 occupational med 43
3 obstetrics/gynecology 43
4 anesthesiology 43
5 colon & rectal surgery 41
6 emergency med 41
7 radiology 41

Are you all ISFP?
 
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nature4me

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thanks for the answers.I'm not going to decide just based on my personality type but it's a major factor for choosing a suitable specialty.I took the medical specialty apptitude test too and this was my result:-allergy and immunology 45-neurology 43-radiology 43-nuclear medicine 42-dermatology 41-infectious dis 40-thoracic surgery 40-pathology 40-anesthesiology 40what's your opinion now?
 

lord_jeebus

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Myers-Briggs personality testing is an invalid and unreliable test that has been abandoned by most of academic psychology in favor of 5-factor personality tests. This is not surprising because Myers-Briggs is based on an oversimplified interpretation of the work of Jung, who was himself a sit-around-hypothesizing-and-don't-do-any-actual-empirical-studies type of psychologist.

To base any sort of life decision on Myers-Briggs is insane.
 

lord_jeebus

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thanks for the answers.I'm not going to decide just based on my personality type but it's a major factor for choosing a suitable specialty.I took the medical specialty apptitude test too and this was my result:-allergy and immunology 45-neurology 43-radiology 43-nuclear medicine 42-dermatology 41-infectious dis 40-thoracic surgery 40-pathology 40-anesthesiology 40what's your opinion now?
Any system that gives someone equivalent scores for neurology and radiology is automatically invalid.
 

Lurch

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Wouldn't rule anything in or out based on the results of this test. Look at how different the specialties are that you listed. In fact, if you took the test 2 months from now, you would likely generate different results. You should forget you ever took this test and base your decision on personal experiences.
 

Green912

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The reliability and validity of the MB test has been questioned with some comparing it to astrology. As many as 75% of repeat testers have been labeled with a different "personality".

The medical aptitude test results are interesting. My #1 match each time was radiology. Couldn't stand my radiology rotation.
 

cleansocks

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I never thought of indecisiveness as a character trait of INTP. Interesting story, though: at the end of undergrad I couldn't decide if I preferred business or medicine. So I ended up getting a dual degree - either due to indecisiveness or opportunity, not sure which. I took a personality test a couple times during the early years of training (once in each school) both of which said I was an INTP. Near the end of training I retook the test and my personality and "shifted" slightly to INTJ. I've taken it a couple times since and always end up INTJ rather than INTP. In any case, the "decision making process" was much easier for me when choosing which specialty to pursue vs my initial career path. Whether that is because I tend to be a J instead of a P now, or because I do not know.

Anyway, things my personality dislikes about anesthesiology residency: attendings nitpicking about things that don't matter or can be done a billion ways correctly, "hovering" attendings who basically do the case, the need for absolute punctuality, ICU (of which unfortunately my program has an excess - ie more than required by the ACGME), loud/know-it-all/disrespectful surgeons, ditto for OR staff, urgent/emergent situations where everyone around me is all stressed out and on edge.

Things that I tend to like: figuring out the "best" way to perform each little task in a way that works well for me, being able to plan ahead as much as I like (caveat being the limited time in which to setup that for which you have planned), not having to rely on others to make sure things are done, getting to be creative and explore because there is no "right way" to do something, getting to test anesthesia theories first hand, short patient interactions.

Guess you have to weigh the pro's and cons and see which seems to win.
 

omniatlas

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Anyway, things my personality dislikes about anesthesiology residency: attendings nitpicking about things that don't matter or can be done a billion ways correctly, "hovering" attendings who basically do the case, the need for absolute punctuality, ICU (of which unfortunately my program has an excess - ie more than required by the ACGME), loud/know-it-all/disrespectful surgeons, ditto for OR staff, urgent/emergent situations where everyone around me is all stressed out and on edge.
I'm not a big fan of the ICU either (my short stint there was pretty depressing). Re: disrespectful surgeons; heard it gets better in non-academic centers?

I have a long post-grad 7 years to go, thats *if* everything goes according to plan.

 

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I took a test online and I came out to be ESTJ (slightly extroverted).

According to the Ultimate Guide for Choosing a Medical Specialty, gas falls under Introverted–Sensing–Feeling– Perceptive (ISFP).

I took the medical specialty aptitude test at http://www.med-ed.virginia.edu/specialties/

And gas came out at the top (yah) --

Rank Specialty Score
1 general surgery 43
2 occupational med 43
3 obstetrics/gynecology 43
4 anesthesiology 43
5 colon & rectal surgery 41
6 emergency med 41
7 radiology 41

Are you all ISFP?
mine were: 1 urology 45
2 thoracic surgery 45
3 neurosurgery 45
4 general surgery 44
5 radiology 44
6 obstetrics/gynecology 44
7 orthopaedic surgery 43
8 pulmonology 43
9 infectious disease 43
10 allergy & immunology 43

anaesthesia was 23rd /40, should l be worried? :D
 
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thanks to Lurch and Green912. By now, it seems both MBTI and medical specialty apptitude tests are invalid!
 
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I never thought of indecisiveness as a character trait of INTP. Interesting story, though: at the end of undergrad I couldn't decide if I preferred business or medicine. So I ended up getting a dual degree - either due to indecisiveness or opportunity, not sure which. I took a personality test a couple times during the early years of training (once in each school) both of which said I was an INTP. Near the end of training I retook the test and my personality and "shifted" slightly to INTJ. I've taken it a couple times since and always end up INTJ rather than INTP. In any case, the "decision making process" was much easier for me when choosing which specialty to pursue vs my initial career path. Whether that is because I tend to be a J instead of a P now, or because I do not know.

Anyway, things my personality dislikes about anesthesiology residency: attendings nitpicking about things that don't matter or can be done a billion ways correctly, "hovering" attendings who basically do the case, the need for absolute punctuality, ICU (of which unfortunately my program has an excess - ie more than required by the ACGME), loud/know-it-all/disrespectful surgeons, ditto for OR staff, urgent/emergent situations where everyone around me is all stressed out and on edge.

Things that I tend to like: figuring out the "best" way to perform each little task in a way that works well for me, being able to plan ahead as much as I like (caveat being the limited time in which to setup that for which you have planned), not having to rely on others to make sure things are done, getting to be creative and explore because there is no "right way" to do something, getting to test anesthesia theories first hand, short patient interactions.

Guess you have to weigh the pro's and cons and see which seems to win.
thanks so much for your complete reply.you mean you are not stressed out and on edge in emergent situations?!should an anesthesiologist be and act like that?another question: is anesthesiology soooo stressful?! what score do you give it from 1 to 10?
 
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nature4me

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another point to be considered:allergy and immunology or thoracic surgery for example both are subspecialties! so, if you can't stand internal medicine or pediatrics or general surgery, you won't stand the subspecialties!
 

omniatlas

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another point to be considered:allergy and immunology or thoracic surgery for example both are subspecialties! so, if you can't stand internal medicine or pediatrics or general surgery, you won't stand the subspecialties!
Well, I can't stand rounding, so anything related to Internal medicine is out of the question. I only did one week of Anaesthethics (during my critical care month -- I hope to do a rotation during Intern year); heres what I found attractive

1. Big on Pharm & Physiology (my two fav topics)
2. Procedures, procedures, procedures
3. No waiting around for your interventions to take effect -- physiological response in seconds/minutes.
4. Quite a technical field; which I think attracts the 'how does it work', engineering mindset (that would be me)
5. Pre-intra-post operative care; and patient focused.
6. Work with a variety of patients; young and old.
7. OR
8. Prefer to be the 'behind the scene' guy.

And I think the top reason I like gas --

The people; laid-back, easy going & non-aggressive. :cool:

We don't have any of these 'CRNA issues' you all are having in the States over here.
 

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Well, I can't stand rounding, so anything related to Internal medicine is out of the question. I only did one week of Anaesthethics (during my critical care month -- I hope to do a rotation during Intern year); heres what I found attractive

1. Big on Pharm & Physiology (my two fav topics)
2. Procedures, procedures, procedures
3. No waiting around for your interventions to take effect -- physiological response in seconds/minutes.
4. Quite a technical field; which I think attracts the 'how does it work', engineering mindset (that would be me)
5. Pre-intra-post operative care; and patient focused.
6. Work with a variety of patients; young and old.
7. OR
8. Prefer to be the 'behind the scene' guy.

And I think the top reason I like gas --

The people; laid-back, easy going & non-aggressive. :cool:

We don't have any of these 'CRNA issues' you all are having in the States over here.
tnx
 
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nature4me

nature4me

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Well, I can't stand rounding, so anything related to Internal medicine is out of the question. I only did one week of Anaesthethics (during my critical care month -- I hope to do a rotation during Intern year); heres what I found attractive

1. Big on Pharm & Physiology (my two fav topics)
2. Procedures, procedures, procedures
3. No waiting around for your interventions to take effect -- physiological response in seconds/minutes.
4. Quite a technical field; which I think attracts the 'how does it work', engineering mindset (that would be me)
5. Pre-intra-post operative care; and patient focused.
6. Work with a variety of patients; young and old.
7. OR
8. Prefer to be the 'behind the scene' guy.

And I think the top reason I like gas --

The people; laid-back, easy going & non-aggressive. :cool:

We don't have any of these 'CRNA issues' you all are having in the States over here.
but what about the stressful situations?can everyone handle them? (esp CPRs)
 
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omniatlas

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these are all great. but what about the stressful situations?can everyone handle them? (esp CPRs)
I've done my fair share of CPR in the the ED, so I don't think I will have any problems dealing with it -- what is the anaesthesiologist's position if there is a code in the OR?

Do they exclusively manage the airway?

From my experience participating in scenarios where a simulated patient has coded, we have specific tasks for

1. Airway
2. Compressions
3. Drugs
4. Scribe

with someone directing and managing everyone into their roles.

As for stress -- I don't know; my biggest fear (and I'm sure everyones) would be an error that ultimately leads to the death of a patient. You're pretty much practicing independently, so any problems with the airway or drugs you pushed, ultimately ends with you.
 
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I've done my fair share of CPR in the the ED, so I don't think I will have any problems dealing with it -- what is the anaesthesiologist's position if there is a code in the OR?

Do they exclusively manage the airway?

From my experience participating in scenarios where a simulated patient has coded, we have specific tasks for

1. Airway
2. Compressions
3. Drugs
4. Scribe

with someone directing and managing everyone into their roles.

As for stress -- I don't know; my biggest fear (and I'm sure everyones) would be an error that ultimately leads to the death of a patient. You're pretty much practicing independently, so any problems with the airway or drugs you pushed, ultimately ends with you.
thanks for the points.
 

Frank Rizzo

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Hi dear colleagues
I'm a GP and I can't decide about my future medical specialty;
BECAUSE I AM AN INTP!
Is there any INTP type anesthesiologist here who is happy and satisfied with his/her career?

regards
Well, I had to look up what INTP meant. Guess I'm behind the times. I better go take this test to see what it tells me to do... It would be a shame if the ABA certificate hanging on my group's office wall ended up being a huge waste of time and money!

Don't let a test tell you what to do with your life. True, it seems that certain personalities trend toward anesthesia, but THERE ARE ALL KINDS OF PEOPLE in this field. If you like it, do it.
 

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I've done my fair share of CPR in the the ED, so I don't think I will have any problems dealing with it -- what is the anaesthesiologist's position if there is a code in the OR?

Do they exclusively manage the airway?

From my experience participating in scenarios where a simulated patient has coded, we have specific tasks for

1. Airway
2. Compressions
3. Drugs
4. Scribe

with someone directing and managing everyone into their roles.

As for stress -- I don't know; my biggest fear (and I'm sure everyones) would be an error that ultimately leads to the death of a patient. You're pretty much practicing independently, so any problems with the airway or drugs you pushed, ultimately ends with you.
at the place where l work, anaesthetist is the resuscitation expert, in- and outside of the operating theatre, therefore, their role is the main one, and other staff usually does as told (by the anaesthetist). And that's one of the reasons l chose this speciality in the first place.
 
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Well, I had to look up what INTP meant. Guess I'm behind the times. I better go take this test to see what it tells me to do... It would be a shame if the ABA certificate hanging on my group's office wall ended up being a huge waste of time and money!

Don't let a test tell you what to do with your life. True, it seems that certain personalities trend toward anesthesia, but THERE ARE ALL KINDS OF PEOPLE in this field. If you like it, do it.
thank you Frank Rizzo.
 
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nature4me

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at the place where l work, anaesthetist is the resuscitation expert, in- and outside of the operating theatre, therefore, their role is the main one, and other staff usually does as told (by the anaesthetist). And that's one of the reasons l chose this speciality in the first place.
Sorry for asking these questions,but I really want to know!-I know that CPR should be done by anesthesiologists when there is a code in different wards(esp ICU & CCU).but should they attend the ER too? I mean is it their responsibility?if yes,what does an emergency medicine specialist do in the ER?!!! -OK! an anesthesiologist should manage the airway(by endotracheal intubation or tracheostomy) and he/she should prescribe drugs!but is it his/her responsibility to do chest compressions too?!!and if yes,then what do nurses do there?!!! tnx
 
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omniatlas

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Sorry for asking these questions,but I really want to know!-I know that CPR should be done by anesthesiologists when there is a code in different wards(esp ICU & CCU).but should they attend the ER too? I mean is it their responsibility?if yes,what does an emergency medicine specialist do in the ER?!!! -OK! an anesthesiologist should manage the airway(by endotracheal intubation or tracheostomy) and he/she should prescribe drugs!but is it his/her responsibility to do chest compressions too?!!and if yes,then what do nurses do there?!!! tnx
My guess would be that gas doctors would be called for difficult cases, e.g. obese patients, children, neonates(??) etc. ED doctors are trained to intubate, gas docs are just more experienced :)

Tracheostomy = turf to ENT surgeon (if theres time).

Nature4me, where do you practice? In Australia there is a rural-GP-anaesthethics pathway.
 
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My guess would be that gas doctors would be called for difficult cases, e.g. obese patients, children, neonates(??) etc. ED doctors are trained to intubate, gas docs are just more experienced :)

Tracheostomy = turf to ENT surgeon (if theres time).

Nature4me, where do you practice? In Australia there is a rural-GP-anaesthethics pathway.
could you please tell me more about that pathway?tnx doc;)
 

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Sorry for asking these questions,but I really want to know!-I know that CPR should be done by anesthesiologists when there is a code in different wards(esp ICU & CCU).but should they attend the ER too? I mean is it their responsibility?if yes,what does an emergency medicine specialist do in the ER?!!! -OK! an anesthesiologist should manage the airway(by endotracheal intubation or tracheostomy) and he/she should prescribe drugs!but is it his/her responsibility to do chest compressions too?!!and if yes,then what do nurses do there?!!! tnx
l think you misunderstood me, l meant in the OR and ICU, and some wards, of course that usually there is no need for anaesthetist in the ER for CPR. But then again, when full trauma alert is on, usually there is surgeon, ER doc and anaesthetist (intensivist) at the scene aka trauma bay.
ER docs should also be resuscitation experts. Chest compressions are usually done by nearest person capable of performing those. Question is not who should perform simple tasks during resuscitation, but rather who is in charge of the code.
 
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nature4me

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l think you misunderstood me, l meant in the OR and ICU, and some wards, of course that usually there is no need for anaesthetist in the ER for CPR. But then again, when full trauma alert is on, usually there is surgeon, ER doc and anaesthetist (intensivist) at the scene aka trauma bay.
ER docs should also be resuscitation experts. Chest compressions are usually done by nearest person capable of performing those. Question is not who should perform simple tasks during resuscitation, but rather who is in charge of the code.
thanks Dr.