nature4me

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Hi dear colleagues. I'm a GP and I can't decide about my future medical specialty; BECAUSE I AM AN INTP! Is there any INTP type neurologist here who is happy and satisfied with his/her career? regards
 

bluntdissector

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Hi dear colleagues. I'm a GP and I can't decide about my future medical specialty; BECAUSE I AM AN INTP! Is there any INTP type neurologist here who is happy and satisfied with his/her career? regards
Saw you asked this in loads of forums. This might be the worse possible way te decide on your specialty. As a GP, which cases interest you most?

Personality tests are mostly BS, this is an important decision, etc etc.
 

neurologist

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Hi dear colleagues. I'm a GP and I can't decide about my future medical specialty; BECAUSE I AM AN INTP! Is there any INTP type neurologist here who is happy and satisfied with his/her career? regards
I'm an INTP. While I like neuro, I will admit that the direct patient care aspect is my least favorite part of it, probably because I am very strongly "I" but only moderately "NTP". I suspect a non-direct-care specialty like path or rads may have been a better fit for me. At any rate, it's not bad enough that I'm plotting some way to get out, but like they say, "hindsight is 20/20."
 

Raggaman

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I did the official test administered by some psychologist and I was a strong INTP. I was in college then, doing math and computer science. I remember talking to him about the results and how being an INTP made me shun social interaction and inadvertently made me lonely. He told me "if you allow yourself, it gets better over time," and smiled with a twinkle in his eye.
Well over time I did "allow myself to change" and ended up having a great time in undergrad and got into medical school and now a neuro residency. I love the interaction I have with the patients now. I get a high off talking to my patients and explaining their disease to them (well, there are some exceptions of course). I make it a point to talk to all the nurses and techs and staff on a daily basis.
In evenings and days off, I still hide out at home and do INTP-introverted things which require alot of thinking and reflecting. It wasn't easy for me at first, but I wanted to change. I was sick of being the awkward person sitting in the corner. I really had no interest in talking to people I didn't know too well, but I decided to try it out. Over time, I started enjoying and cherishing it.
I am not telling you to change like me, maybe I am not an INTP anymore like I used to be. All I know is, I love what I do now and wouldn't want to sit in a corner and read images all day long.

Good luck
 
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danielmd06

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ENTJ. Sorry.
 
OP
nature4me

nature4me

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Oct 24, 2009
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I'm an INTP. While I like neuro, I will admit that the direct patient care aspect is my least favorite part of it, probably because I am very strongly "I" but only moderately "NTP". I suspect a non-direct-care specialty like path or rads may have been a better fit for me. At any rate, it's not bad enough that I'm plotting some way to get out, but like they say, "hindsight is 20/20."
thank you for your sincerity.
 
OP
nature4me

nature4me

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Oct 24, 2009
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I did the official test administered by some psychologist and I was a strong INTP. I was in college then, doing math and computer science. I remember talking to him about the results and how being an INTP made me shun social interaction and inadvertently made me lonely. He told me "if you allow yourself, it gets better over time," and smiled with a twinkle in his eye.
Well over time I did "allow myself to change" and ended up having a great time in undergrad and got into medical school and now a neuro residency. I love the interaction I have with the patients now. I get a high off talking to my patients and explaining their disease to them (well, there are some exceptions of course). I make it a point to talk to all the nurses and techs and staff on a daily basis.
In evenings and days off, I still hide out at home and do INTP-introverted things which require alot of thinking and reflecting. It wasn't easy for me at first, but I wanted to change. I was sick of being the awkward person sitting in the corner. I really had no interest in talking to people I didn't know too well, but I decided to try it out. Over time, I started enjoying and cherishing it.
I am not telling you to change like me, maybe I am not an INTP anymore like I used to be. All I know is, I love what I do now and wouldn't want to sit in a corner and read images all day long.

Good luck
thanks doctor. I think you are still an INTP! but you have adapted yourself to your career situations. best regards.
 

Mattchiavelli

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My school administers a Meyers-Briggs to all our MS1's and I ended up being an INTP, it broke down each category and I was almost even between I and E, T and F. I was like 75% P and almost 95% N. Currently I'm interviewing for neurology programs. A friend of mine tested as this as well and she considered neurology but is going into emergency medicine.

The test is really just a tool to act as a jumping off point for examining yourself and how you operate. If you let it rule your decision of specialty you're a fool and if you totally disregard it I think you miss an opportunity to look at your strengths and weaknesses in a new way.

I think it's narrowing to think if you're an introvert you HAVE to go into path/rads and never talk to anyone. Any field of medicine involves interaction with people, just some favor patients and some favor allied health staff [ever heard of pathology assistants?]. One of the refreshing things about being around other introverts is being able to have two people in the same area and not have to talk and neither gets anxious about the lack of interaction.

I was attracted to neurology because it involves a lot of pattern recognition [supposedly an N trait] and for a lot of other reasons...spend some time with people practicing neurology before you decide, and it's ok to have an open mind.
 
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nature4me

nature4me

5+ Year Member
Oct 24, 2009
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My school administers a Meyers-Briggs to all our MS1's and I ended up being an INTP, it broke down each category and I was almost even between I and E, T and F. I was like 75% P and almost 95% N. Currently I'm interviewing for neurology programs. A friend of mine tested as this as well and she considered neurology but is going into emergency medicine.

The test is really just a tool to act as a jumping off point for examining yourself and how you operate. If you let it rule your decision of specialty you're a fool and if you totally disregard it I think you miss an opportunity to look at your strengths and weaknesses in a new way.

I think it's narrowing to think if you're an introvert you HAVE to go into path/rads and never talk to anyone. Any field of medicine involves interaction with people, just some favor patients and some favor allied health staff [ever heard of pathology assistants?]. One of the refreshing things about being around other introverts is being able to have two people in the same area and not have to talk and neither gets anxious about the lack of interaction.

I was attracted to neurology because it involves a lot of pattern recognition [supposedly an N trait] and for a lot of other reasons...spend some time with people practicing neurology before you decide, and it's ok to have an open mind.
thanks.