QuikClot

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So my in-laws are thinking of buying me a stethoscope to celebrate the start of med school. I'm interested in an electronic model that amp.s the sound and filters background noise, like the Littman 3000 or 4100. Anyone use one, in the field or in the ER? What was your experience?
 

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QuikClot said:
So my in-laws are thinking of buying me a stethoscope to celebrate the start of med school. I'm interested in an electronic model that amp.s the sound and filters background noise, like the Littman 3000 or 4100. Anyone use one, in the field or in the ER? What was your experience?
Way too expensive for my taste.
 
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QuikClot

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No doubt, hence the in-laws offer brings a previously unaffordable offer into the realm of possibility. What I'm asking is, cost no object, does this technology deliver what it promises?
 
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QuikClot said:
No doubt, hence the in-laws offer brings a previously unaffordable offer into the realm of possibility. What I'm asking is, cost no object, does this technology deliver what it promises?
They seem to work pretty well, but personally I would rather learn the fundamentals of medicine using the standard tools rather than learn to rely on an expensive gadget for the rest of my career. The only people I've seen using electronic stethoscopes on the wards are 70+ year-old cardiologists who are losing their hearing.

Plus, I think about 1/3 of my classmates lost their stethoscopes at some point during medical school.
 
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QuikClot

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My high-frequency hearing is not good (Seattle Fire gives you a test during their hiring process). The siren, I suppose, or too much loud music.

I suppose I'm just nervous about missing something. Your point is well taken about being comfortable with the standard tools.
 

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QuikClot said:
My high-frequency hearing is not good (Seattle Fire gives you a test during their hiring process). The siren, I suppose, or too much loud music.

I suppose I'm just nervous about missing something. Your point is well taken about being comfortable with the standard tools.
I have used the 3M™ Littmann® Electronic Stethoscope Model 4100 WS (or equivalent) for probably 3 years now.

It is AWESOME.

I originally bought it because i was having the difficulty determining COPD vs CHF.

Now, I'm a 2nd year med student and I can actually hear heart murmurs.

I honestly think they improve your clinical judgement. If someone has crackles, you will hear them if they are there.

One caveat, you HAVE to get used to it, but once you do you will never use a regular one again. You have to use a slightly different technique when doing BPs but heart and lung sounds are incredible.

As far as my model, I don't think the recording feature is worth it because you can't get them into .wav files or anything that any computer can play ... this totally blows. If they have a model without the recording and it is cheaper then i would go for it.

My model has been abused extensively and is still working!!!! Highly reliable.

Most common complaint is they are stolen. Mine has been left everywhere and has not run off ... and I think this is why ... I ordered the engraving from:

http://www.stethoscope.com/

No way it won't be recognized as yours.

My review: enthusiatic: :thumbup: :thumbup:
 

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I have a $75 Littman Master Classic that I love. Honestly I think you should be perfectly fine with a standard (albit high quality) scope.

What do you use now? Can you tell the difference between ronchi/rales/wheezing? Can you take accurate blood pressures? Can you hear S1 and S2 heart sounds? If so, theres no reason why you shouldnt be perfectly fine.

I feel like most of listening to these kinds of sounds (basic lung, basic heart, blood pressures) is mostly experience, not the type of scope you use. Once you get used to what you're listening for, you'll hear what you need to. No need for anything fancy imo.


...Plus I think those electronic scopes are kinda lame and are usually used by lame people.... haha... ;) No offense intended viostorm.
 
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QuikClot

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As I think I've explained a couple times already, I may be getting a stethoscope without having to pay for it. This generous offer is not convertable to cash. Hence, what I'm using now does not come into it. And, yes, on the ambulance I've had occasion to distinguish between different lung sounds. My fundemental skills are fine. Of course, any new technology is going to be greeted by a chorus of providers who want everyone to do things the "real" way -- manual BPs only, tape to secure tubes, and why are you using that glucometer when you can just taste the urine? I'm really looking for people who have had experience with the product.
 

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QuikClot said:
So my in-laws are thinking of buying me a stethoscope to celebrate the start of med school. I'm interested in an electronic model that amp.s the sound and filters background noise, like the Littman 3000 or 4100. Anyone use one, in the field or in the ER? What was your experience?
I've never seen one used in real life.
 

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I haven't used the Littmann electronic 'scopes, but I used the Andromed/HP/Philips Stethos on a 30-day trial a few years ago, and ended up sending it back. The basic problems I had with it, and which affect pretty much all of the electronic/amplifying stethoscopes, were the background noise, and the fact that amplification made it difficult to accurately grade cardiac murmurs. The biggest advantages are in noisy environments and/or for hearing-impaired users. Since you've got some high-frequency hearing loss and you work in EMS, there's a good chance you'll like an amplified stethoscope.

If you're not set on the Littmann, you might want to try the DRG Echo ( http://www.allheart.com/omechoamp.html ). It combines a standard high-quality acoustic stethoscope with digital amplification, which can be turned on or off. The best of both worlds, perhaps?
 
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QuikClot

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KentW said:
If you're not set on the Littmann, you might want to try the DRG Echo ( http://www.allheart.com/omechoamp.html ). It combines a standard high-quality acoustic stethoscope with digital amplification, which can be turned on or off. The best of both worlds, perhaps?
Great advice, thank you. I'll check out the Echo.
 
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