Anyone else in between specialties?

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Calizboosted76

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So I have made some other posts but I was curious if anyone else is in the same situation.

I had been set on an Uber competitive specialty since I was a child but I have decided against it for a multitude of reasons. So now I am at a loss and unsure of what specialty to pursue. I have a few things that "I think" are important to me.

As of now the only specialty that I do not want to pursue is obgyn. I enjoyed the surgeries as well as the practice set up but the bread and butter are not for me.

I will definitely pursue something surgical or procedural however I just haven't found that specialty where I feel "at home". I also am wanting to do private practice no matter the specialty (if possible) and a buddy suggests FM due to wide range of procedures however I don't want to be a PCP and I have heard stories from friends that are attendings who had there practices and were forced to sell to a bigger company in the area. It is definitely discouraging.

Ideally it would be great to work inpatient as well as having a day or two of clinic where I could do outpatient procedures.

I feel I am having such a difficult time with finding a specialty because I had told myself since I was a child that I would be a surgeon.

Side note: I have been considering Interventional Cards, H/O, General surgery, PCCM, and Ortho. Not sure what I am trying to accomplish with this post.

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What do your numbers look like (boards, pubs, etc.)? I feel like knowing those will make people's suggestions more accurate for you (e.g. no point suggesting ortho if your Step 2 is <240).

If you know for a fact you want to become a surgeon, and the question is which field of surgery, then maybe consider gen surg -> fellowship? I hear most gen surg fellowships are attainable from an academic program minus surg onc and peds, the latter 2 being gigachad uber competitive fields.
 
What do your numbers look like (boards, pubs, etc.)? I feel like knowing those will make people's suggestions more accurate for you (e.g. no point suggesting ortho if your Step 2 is <240).

If you know for a fact you want to become a surgeon, and the question is which field of surgery, then maybe consider gen surg -> fellowship? I hear most gen surg fellowships are attainable from an academic program minus surg onc and peds, the latter 2 being gigachad uber competitive fields.

Not taking the Step series (had it scheduled but ended up backing out due to some personal reasons) only applying with COMLEX and my COMLEX 2 practices scores have been around 600. I know only having COMLEX will limit where I apply to and I am fine with this.

Publications are decent. I just recounted everything and I have around 7 publications with 4 more in the works currently as well as over 20 podium presentations.

I am trying to consider all aspects including family life as I do have a child who is already having a rough time with me being away just for medical school studying so I can only imagine how hard a surgical residency is going to be.
 
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Not taking the Step series (had it scheduled but ended up backing out due to some personal reasons) only applying with COMLEX and my COMLEX 2 practices scores have been around 600. I know only having COMLEX will limit where I apply to and I am fine with this.

Publications are decent. I just recounted everything and I have around 7 publications with 4 more in the works currently as well as over 20 podium presentations.

I am trying to consider all aspects including family life as I do have a child who is already having a rough time with me being away just for medical school studying so I can only imagine how hard a surgical residency is going to be.
I don't want you to take this the wrong way. But from my anecdotal experience with friends, family, and classmates in medicine, I would tell you right off the bat that landing an IM spot that sets you up to match a competitive fellowship like cards or PCCM is EXTREMELY unlikely as a COMLEX only applicant. PCCM used to be a relatively moderate difficulty match but that has changed in recent cycles and its gotten close to Cards/HemeOnc tier by some metrics. If you apply IM with your app, I would be willing to practice general med or have a backup less competitive fellowship you would be ok with (unfortunately these are the non-procedural ones). Ortho is also pretty much out of the question unless you have strong personal connections with academic orthopods.

Your GenSurg application will also be severely limited. You'd basically have to try to audition at as many former AOA programs as possible and try to impress someone.

You said you are fine with COMLEX limiting where you are able to apply, but your specialty aspirations seem to go against that. None of the specialties you've listed are particularly DO friendly and being a COMLEX only applicant makes your chances a LOT worse. Again this is me being sincere and telling you my thoughts in the hope you don't get blindsided on match day.

As a COMLEX only applicant who likes procedures and values work/life balance I think PM&R would be right up your alley and definitely something you can be pretty confident you would be able to match to. Have you looked into that?
 
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I don't want you to take this the wrong way. But from my anecdotal experience with friends, family, and classmates in medicine, I would tell you right off the bat that landing an IM spot that sets you up to match a competitive fellowship like cards or PCCM is EXTREMELY unlikely as a COMLEX only applicant. PCCM used to be a relatively moderate difficulty match but that has changed in recent cycles and its gotten close to Cards/HemeOnc tier by some metrics. If you apply IM with your app, I would be willing to practice general med or have a backup less competitive fellowship you would be ok with (unfortunately these are the non-procedural ones). Ortho is also pretty much out of the question unless you have strong personal connections with academic orthopods.

Your GenSurg application will also be severely limited. You'd basically have to try to audition at as many former AOA programs as possible and try to impress someone.

You said you are fine with COMLEX limiting where you are able to apply, but your specialty aspirations seem to go against that. None of the specialties you've listed are particularly DO friendly and being a COMLEX only applicant makes your chances a LOT worse. Again this is me being sincere and telling you my thoughts in the hope you don't get blindsided on match day.

As a COMLEX only applicant who likes procedures and values work/life balance I think PM&R would be right up your alley and definitely something you can be pretty confident you would be able to match to. Have you looked into that?

Hey I appreciate the comment. I actually have friends who have matched into PCCM as well as Cards with only COMLEX and no where close to the amount of research that I have when they got into their residency. I know this is few and far between but we will see!

As far as Ortho being off the table I think that isn't necessarily true. I have spoke to many programs as well as done quite a bit of research and STEP isnt required as long as you kill auditions, COMLEX, and have a solid all around applications. Theres quite a few Ortho residencies that have said they could care less about STEP. Obviously nothing is 100% and I am going to have a back up no matter what I decide to do.

Again, I really appreciate your comment!

I have looked into PMR but I am not sure that is the specialty for me. I am planning on doing a rotation in it to see if I could be happy there.
 
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Hey I appreciate the comment. I actually have friends who have matched into PCCM as well as Cards with only COMLEX and no where close to the amount of research that I have when they got into their residency. I know this is few and far between but we will see!

As far as Ortho being off the table I think that isn't necessarily true. I have spoke to many programs as well as done quite a bit of research and STEP isnt required as long as you kill auditions, COMLEX, and have a solid all around applications. Theres quite a few Ortho residencies that have said they could care less about STEP. Obviously nothing is 100% and I am going to have a back up no matter what I decide to do.

Again, I really appreciate your comment!

I have looked into PMR but I am not sure that is the specialty for me. I am planning on doing a rotation in it to see if I could be happy there.
@TheBoneDoctah can probably confirm or deny if Ortho would be off the table. I have followed their posts for some time now.
 
Hey I appreciate the comment. I actually have friends who have matched into PCCM as well as Cards with only COMLEX and no where close to the amount of research that I have when they got into their residency. I know this is few and far between but we will see!

As far as Ortho being off the table I think that isn't necessarily true. I have spoke to many programs as well as done quite a bit of research and STEP isnt required as long as you kill auditions, COMLEX, and have a solid all around applications. Theres quite a few Ortho residencies that have said they could care less about STEP. Obviously nothing is 100% and I am going to have a back up no matter what I decide to do.

Again, I really appreciate your comment!

I have looked into PMR but I am not sure that is the specialty for me. I am planning on doing a rotation in it to see if I could be happy there.
Unsure about the other fields but Orthopedic Surgery is not impossible if you Audition well is what I have been told.
 
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I don't want you to take this the wrong way. But from my anecdotal experience with friends, family, and classmates in medicine, I would tell you right off the bat that landing an IM spot that sets you up to match a competitive fellowship like cards or PCCM is EXTREMELY unlikely as a COMLEX only applicant. PCCM used to be a relatively moderate difficulty match but that has changed in recent cycles and its gotten close to Cards/HemeOnc tier by some metrics. If you apply IM with your app, I would be willing to practice general med or have a backup less competitive fellowship you would be ok with (unfortunately these are the non-procedural ones). Ortho is also pretty much out of the question unless you have strong personal connections with academic orthopods.

Your GenSurg application will also be severely limited. You'd basically have to try to audition at as many former AOA programs as possible and try to impress someone.

You said you are fine with COMLEX limiting where you are able to apply, but your specialty aspirations seem to go against that. None of the specialties you've listed are particularly DO friendly and being a COMLEX only applicant makes your chances a LOT worse. Again this is me being sincere and telling you my thoughts in the hope you don't get blindsided on match day.

As a COMLEX only applicant who likes procedures and values work/life balance I think PM&R would be right up your alley and definitely something you can be pretty confident you would be able to match to. Have you looked into that?

You are incorrect.

All IM subspecialties are open if you match into a competitive IM program and make connections, especially for Cardiology and PCCM. I agree with this post that having good Step scores can improve your chances compared to COMLEX only. For IM subspecialties, competitiveness rankings generally more or less follow this paradigm, with yearly fluctuations.

1. GI
2. Cards
3. Heme Onc
4. PCCM
5. Rheum
6. Rest of the IM subspecialties

They are all attainable as a DO.
 
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You are incorrect.

All IM subspecialties are open if you match into a competitive IM program and make connections, especially for Cardiology and PCCM. I agree with this post that having good Step scores can improve your chances compared to COMLEX only. For IM subspecialties, competitiveness rankings generally more or less follow this paradigm, with yearly fluctuations.

1. GI
2. Cards
3. Heme Onc
4. PCCM
5. Rheum
6. Rest of the IM subspecialties

They are all attainable as a DO.

This is good to hear. I had teed up a few text messages to my friends who matched these fields to double check they did not take STEP. I know some of them didnt but when the first person commented I started to get worried lol.
 
Can match low tier academic IM with just comlex as long as everything else is good. But you do have to be geographically flexible. SDN acts like no one outside of the top 50 IM programs matches competitive fellowships and it’s just not true.
 
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Can match low tier academic IM with just comlex as long as everything else is good. But you do have to be geographically flexible. SDN acts like no one outside of the top 50 IM programs matches competitive fellowships and it’s just not true.

Yea. obviously I take everything on here with a grain of salt. When the time comes to match I will definitely take everything into consideration and decide if being close to family is worth going somewhere that will more then likely not help me match a competitive fellowship.
 
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You are incorrect.

All IM subspecialties are open if you match into a competitive IM program and make connections, especially for Cardiology and PCCM. I agree with this post that having good Step scores can improve your chances compared to COMLEX only. For IM subspecialties, competitiveness rankings generally more or less follow this paradigm, with yearly fluctuations.

1. GI
2. Cards
3. Heme Onc
4. PCCM
5. Rheum
6. Rest of the IM subspecialties

They are all attainable as a DO.
Why is rheum competitive in adult world?
 
I hadn’t heard that it was. I thought it was an easier specialty to achieve.
Me too. They ranked it by itself and I was under the impression it would’ve been under “all the rest”
 
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All IM subspecialties are open if you match into a competitive IM program and make connections
If you'd fully read my comment, you would realise that matching into a competitive IM program is exactly what I said would be difficult as a COMLEX only DO.

Obviously if we are in a hypothetical where OP already has a competitive IM program match lined up, those fellowships are open, but my entire point was to emphasize that the prospect of a well regarded IM match is far from given.

Everything is theoretically attainable from DO. We are fully licensed physicians and are eligible for every ACGME post grad program.

OP seems like a go-getter and he is definitely above average in research both of those are strong positives for his chances.

But on a subjective level, I feel that match rates near 50-60ish (which is the case for DOs and surgery) are horrible and people with such odds should work to secure a strong back up plan far before residency apps are even due. Others will advise "giving it all you got" and waiting to see what happens before investing in a back up. Both perspectives have their pros and cons, but I would simply reaffirm that just because something can happen in theory or has happened to some people doesn't mean we should disregard the statistics on things DO unfriendliness.

On another note, simply matching IM (which DOs have absolutely no issue doing) and matching at a well regarded/university based program are two very different things. And with the way match works, ending up at the bottom of your rank list and realizing that getting Cards will be a hell of a uphill climb if it even happens at all is an absolute gut punch. I have seen people with fellowship aspirations get stuck doing gen IM or taking multiple extra years to get their fellowship of choice, and I think weighting that against a residency you would prefer over gen med is something really worth thinking about.
 
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Me too. They ranked it by itself and I was under the impression it would’ve been under “all the rest”
It falls under ‘all the rest’ to a degree but it has limited spots, a physician supply shortage and is considered a ‘lifestyle’ specialty with minimal emergencies …. i.e. lupus cerebritis, etc to name one of the few
 
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If you'd fully read my comment, you would realise that matching into a competitive IM program is exactly what I said would be difficult as a COMLEX only DO.

Obviously if we are in a hypothetical where OP already has a competitive IM program match lined up, those fellowships are open, but my entire point was to emphasize that the prospect of a well regarded IM match is far from given.

Everything is theoretically attainable from DO. We are fully licensed physicians and are eligible for every ACGME post grad program.

OP seems like a go-getter and he is definitely above average in research both of those are strong positives for his chances.

But on a subjective level, I feel that match rates near 50-60ish (which is the case for DOs and surgery) are horrible and people with such odds should work to secure a strong back up plan far before residency apps are even due. Others will advise "giving it all you got" and waiting to see what happens before investing in a back up. Both perspectives have their pros and cons, but I would simply reaffirm that just because something can happen in theory or has happened to some people doesn't mean we should disregard the statistics on things DO unfriendliness.

On another note, simply matching IM (which DOs have absolutely no issue doing) and matching at a well regarded/university based program are two very different things. And with the way match works, ending up at the bottom of your rank list and realizing that getting Cards will be a hell of a uphill climb if it even happens at all is an absolute gut punch. I have seen people with fellowship aspirations get stuck doing gen IM or taking multiple extra years to get their fellowship of choice, and I think weighting that against a residency you would prefer over gen med is something really worth thinking about.
I am 100% taking that into consideration and I wouldn’t be miserable being a hospitalist. I am just happy to be able to become a physician. Again I do appreciate your point of view as well as everyone else's!
 
Can only comment on Ortho. 600 plus score for historically DO programs would probably still be ok. That is not the issue, but the fact that you’re so conflicted. I know Ortho is competitive, but you have to be all in. Your competition will be rotating at 5+ programs. You should have these rotations lined up already.
 
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Can only comment on Ortho. 600 plus score for historically DO programs would probably still be ok. That is not the issue, but the fact that you’re so conflicted. I know Ortho is competitive, but you have to be all in. Your competition will be rotating at 5+ programs. You should have these rotations lined up already.

Hey I appreciate your comment!

I am very conflicted. Nothing has really stuck out to me. My official Ortho rotation is coming up but from shadowing and scrubbing on cases with some of the surgeons when we had no cases during GS I enjoyed it. I do not think my GS really gave me the best experience because I was with a bariatric surgeon and we did bands and sleeves more than anything. Maybe a few choles as well. Nothing really stuck out to me though.

I haven't been drawn in by any rotation thus far. I just feel so lost.
 
Can only comment on Ortho. 600 plus score for historically DO programs would probably still be ok. That is not the issue, but the fact that you’re so conflicted. I know Ortho is competitive, but you have to be all in. Your competition will be rotating at 5+ programs. You should have these rotations lined up already.
But it is good to know that it is possible.

And you mentioned I should have these set up already. I just finished first half of 3rd year and have been mainly doing my core rotations. We were just given access to VSLO and it hasn't opened to us yet. I had no clue I should be setting these up already.
 
But it is good to know that it is possible.

And you mentioned I should have these set up already. I just finished first half of 3rd year and have been mainly doing my core rotations. We were just given access to VSLO and it hasn't opened to us yet. I had no clue I should be setting these up already.

Don’t wanna beat you up. But unless things changed, the DO programs probably already started taking applications for rotations. I know most would start on Jan 1st for sure. I’m not sure what VSLO is and if DO programs participate in if. Is it like VSAS?
 
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Don’t wanna beat you up. But unless things changed, the DO programs probably already started taking applications for rotations. I know most would start on Jan 1st for sure. I’m not sure what VSLO is and if DO programs participate in if. Is it like VSAS?

Yea its the "Visiting student learning opportunities". I just reached out to a few mentors who applied surgery and one specifically ortho surgery and he said that I have about 3 months until worrying about that. I am reaching out to my rotation coordinator as we speak to ask.
 
Yea its the "Visiting student learning opportunities". I just reached out to a few mentors who applied surgery and one specifically ortho surgery and he said that I have about 3 months until worrying about that. I am reaching out to my rotation coordinator as we speak to ask.

Well, sorry for speaking too soon and not doing my own research. Back when I was a student, it was a mad rush to sign up for these rotations and they started booking them as early as 9-10 months out. Students would book multiple places for the same month and nothing would be available. Just be ready to sign up whenever you can and rotate at as many places as you can.
 
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Well, sorry for speaking too soon and not doing my own research. Back when I was a student, it was a mad rush to sign up for these rotations and they started booking them as early as 9-10 months out. Students would book multiple places for the same month and nothing would be available. Just be ready to sign up whenever you can and rotate at as many places as you can.

I am still waiting on the response from my rotation coordinator. I will report back when they respond. Maybe I am just behind the ball (not normally the case because #anxiety lol).
 
I am still waiting on the response from my rotation coordinator. I will report back when they respond. Maybe I am just behind the ball (not normally the case because #anxiety lol).
FYI an OG DO ortho program in Ohio doesn’t use VSLO and you can start applying on their website Feb 1st.
 
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Yea its the "Visiting student learning opportunities". I just reached out to a few mentors who applied surgery and one specifically ortho surgery and he said that I have about 3 months until worrying about that. I am reaching out to my rotation coordinator as we speak to ask.
Most DO ortho programs don’t use VSLO…. You set up rotations with them directly most of the time.
 
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Why is rheum competitive in adult world?
I hadn’t heard that it was. I thought it was an easier specialty to achieve.

Rheum is less competitive than Heme Onc, more competitive than Endo. Endo is more competitive than Nephrology/etc.
Allergy is wild card.
If you want to match Rheum you need some posters, case reports, etc IN rhuem to be competitive.
If you'd fully read my comment, you would realise that matching into a competitive IM program is exactly what I said would be difficult as a COMLEX only DO.

Obviously if we are in a hypothetical where OP already has a competitive IM program match lined up, those fellowships are open, but my entire point was to emphasize that the prospect of a well regarded IM match is far from given.

Everything is theoretically attainable from DO. We are fully licensed physicians and are eligible for every ACGME post grad program.

OP seems like a go-getter and he is definitely above average in research both of those are strong positives for his chances.

But on a subjective level, I feel that match rates near 50-60ish (which is the case for DOs and surgery) are horrible and people with such odds should work to secure a strong back up plan far before residency apps are even due. Others will advise "giving it all you got" and waiting to see what happens before investing in a back up. Both perspectives have their pros and cons, but I would simply reaffirm that just because something can happen in theory or has happened to some people doesn't mean we should disregard the statistics on things DO unfriendliness.

On another note, simply matching IM (which DOs have absolutely no issue doing) and matching at a well regarded/university based program are two very different things. And with the way match works, ending up at the bottom of your rank list and realizing that getting Cards will be a hell of a uphill climb if it even happens at all is an absolute gut punch. I have seen people with fellowship aspirations get stuck doing gen IM or taking multiple extra years to get their fellowship of choice, and I think weighting that against a residency you would prefer over gen med is something really worth thinking about.
Matching competitively for a DO without step scores can be rough.

That being said there's plenty of good communiversity programs, multispecialty large community programs, and midwestern/ plains university that are happy to take comlex only.

And I think this is an important facet. IM is not a bridge. It's a whole specialty. You may at the end of your 3 years of training decide you want to do something different from what you started or you may decide you're honestly done with training. People start out in residency hell bent on cardiology, but when they are in their 2nd year of residency realize they either cant do it or are too tired to do it.

I know plenty of residents who started off wanting to do Cardiology or critical care and by their 3rd year they're completely unwilling to do it.
 
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Rheum is less competitive than Heme Onc, more competitive than Endo. Endo is more competitive than Nephrology/etc.
Allergy is wild card.
If you want to match Rheum you need some posters, case reports, etc IN rhuem to be competitive.

Matching competitively for a DO without step scores can be rough.

That being said there's plenty of good communiversity programs, multispecialty large community programs, and midwestern/ plains university that are happy to take comlex only.

And I think this is an important facet. IM is not a bridge. It's a whole specialty. You may at the end of your 3 years of training decide you want to do something different from what you started or you may decide you're honestly done with training. People start out in residency hell bent on cardiology, but when they are in their 2nd year of residency realize they either cant do it or are too tired to do it.

I know plenty of residents who started off wanting to do Cardiology or critical care and by their 3rd year they're completely unwilling to do it.

This is one reason I am scared to commit to IM because I think I would just be ready to start my career.
 
This is one reason I am scared to commit to IM because I think I would just be ready to start my career.

Because starting a job after 3 years of post graduate training for a job making 250-325k is a bad deal?
We've talked before and like I said before, I think we're really pulling at strings here. You have the keys to a lot of options after IM residency.
If you've got debt you can work 5-10 years in a forgiveness enabled setting and blow your debt away. Go do Rural IM and be beloved by everyone in your community and make a good earning.
Etc.

One of my friends was thinking about doing CC. He's now a hospitalist and happily making 270k. Which he recognizes is 200k more than he'd make as a fellow for 3 years. And yes, investment value versus immediate is a real thing. Having enough money to buy a house 3 years earlier is not insignificant for your mental health. Not being in training for another 3 years is not insignificant for your physical or mental health.
 
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Because starting a job after 3 years of post graduate training for a job making 250-325k is a bad deal?
We've talked before and like I said before, I think we're really pulling at strings here. You have the keys to a lot of options after IM residency.
If you've got debt you can work 5-10 years in a forgiveness enabled setting and blow your debt away. Go do Rural IM and be beloved by everyone in your community and make a good earning.
Etc.

One of my friends was thinking about doing CC. He's now a hospitalist and happily making 270k. Which he recognizes is 200k more than he'd make as a fellow for 3 years. And yes, investment value versus immediate is a real thing. Having enough money to buy a house 3 years earlier is not insignificant for your mental health. Not being in training for another 3 years is not insignificant for your physical or mental health.

I dont necessarily think it is a bad deal, its just not what I necessarily want as of now. We will see though.
 
Because starting a job after 3 years of post graduate training for a job making 250-325k is a bad deal?
We've talked before and like I said before, I think we're really pulling at strings here. You have the keys to a lot of options after IM residency.
If you've got debt you can work 5-10 years in a forgiveness enabled setting and blow your debt away. Go do Rural IM and be beloved by everyone in your community and make a good earning.
Etc.

One of my friends was thinking about doing CC. He's now a hospitalist and happily making 270k. Which he recognizes is 200k more than he'd make as a fellow for 3 years. And yes, investment value versus immediate is a real thing. Having enough money to buy a house 3 years earlier is not insignificant for your mental health. Not being in training for another 3 years is not insignificant for your physical or mental health.

Being a hospitalist is under rated IMO. I have been a hospitalist for 2.5 yrs and I really like the job.

Lifestyle and $$$ is great IMO. Never thought I would have that kind of flexibility as a physician.

For instance, I have colleagues who would go to their kids soccer game while working.

On paper, we are supposed to work 84 hrs every other week (7 days on/off, 7a-7pm), but most of us truly work between 60-70/hrs every other week for a nice salary of 350k/yr at my shop.
 
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Being a hospitalist is under rated IMO. I have been a hospitalist for 2.5 yrs and I really like the job.

Lifestyle and $$$ is great IMO. Never thought I would have that kind of flexibility as a physician.

For instance, I have colleagues who would go to their kids soccer game while working.

On paper, we are supposed to work 84 hrs every other week (7 days on/off, 7a-7pm), but most of us truly work between 60-70/hrs every other week for a nice salary of 350k/yr at my shot.

Yea honestly I think I’m struggling with letting go of childhood dreams. I am also afraid if I choose hospitalist I will always wonder “what if”
 
Yea honestly I think I’m struggling with letting go of childhood dreams. I am also afraid if I choose hospitalist I will always wonder “what if”
2 things. I wouldn’t necessarily let childhood dreams cloud your judgement. Your priorities as a child are not that of an adult. Adults recognize work isn’t the only thing that will bring fulfillment. The second is, money isn’t everything but be smart. I chose a mentally stimulating field that won’t necessarily pay off big for the extra training. But it brings enough money to fund the lifestyle I want, it’s a very good family lifestyle, and the pathology is quite interesting.
 
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Yea honestly I think I’m struggling with letting go of childhood dreams. I am also afraid if I choose hospitalist I will always wonder “what if”
You will likely have more clarity by the time you are a PGY2 if you choose IM.
 
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2 things. I wouldn’t necessarily let childhood dreams cloud your judgement. Your priorities as a child are not that of an adult. Adults recognize work isn’t the only thing that will bring fulfillment. The second is, money isn’t everything but be smart. I chose a mentally stimulating field that won’t necessarily pay off big for the extra training. But it brings enough money to fund the lifestyle I want, it’s a very good family lifestyle, and the pathology is quite interesting.
What was it that you chose again?
 
What was it that you chose again?
I went into a pediatric subspecialty that is not critical care so not a huge jump in pay. On par with adult hospitalist pay in the same cities. Having said that, it takes twice as long training to have that similar pay.
 
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I say apply EM. It's like the perfect place for people who like clinic and procedures. You don't need step either.
 
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