Arthelion

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So I realize that this whole learning to be a doctor thing involves acquiring a broad knowledge base and being familiar with the general range of diseases one sees in a population, but I only need to see so many decompensated alcoholic cirrhotics before I get the idea and get tired of it. I went to medical school for ophthalmology, it was the only rotation I truly enjoyed and now I'm spending a year in the internal medicine trenches. Theoretically theres a light at the end of the tunnel but its sure a long way away.
 

DOCTORSAIB

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I know what you mean. It seemed rather illogical to me too at the beginning of intern year. I was never in love with my 3rd/4th year medicine rotation. So having to indure a year of it seemed like it was going to be pure torture.

But about mid-way through I realized just how much I had learned. There is a maturation that occurs. You not only learn a lot of medicine but also to broaden your view when approaching a patient. In a sense you learn "how you" and "how to" think.

To that extent I highly recommend you read the book "How Doctors Think" at some point during your internship. You will witness what I'm talking about. And hopefully find enjoyment in the trenches of intern year! G'luck.
 

JMK2005

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Remember, you went to medical school to become a doctor.

Mostly, internship will be a lot of stuff that you probably won't use, but I agree with the above that internship broadens your approach to the patients. It has its benefits.
 

orbitsurgMD

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So I realize that this whole learning to be a doctor thing involves acquiring a broad knowledge base and being familiar with the general range of diseases one sees in a population, but I only need to see so many decompensated alcoholic cirrhotics before I get the idea and get tired of it. I went to medical school for ophthalmology, it was the only rotation I truly enjoyed and now I'm spending a year in the internal medicine trenches. Theoretically theres a light at the end of the tunnel but its sure a long way away.
What did you learn this week about wound management?

What did you see as far as diabetes goes?

See anything interesting in the way of stroke?

Did any of your sick patients have optic neuropathy? Did you look?

You know, I still remember and use things I learned in internship.
 

TMinusZero

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Literally, yes, very tired here.
Learning a lot though, even though I think I would be learning more if I could (a) get more sleep, (b) find more time to read.
Almost one month down, 11 to go!
 

KWTRCSI

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So I realize that this whole learning to be a doctor thing involves acquiring a broad knowledge base and being familiar with the general range of diseases one sees in a population, but I only need to see so many decompensated alcoholic cirrhotics before I get the idea and get tired of it. I went to medical school for ophthalmology, it was the only rotation I truly enjoyed and now I'm spending a year in the internal medicine trenches. Theoretically theres a light at the end of the tunnel but its sure a long way away.
Althought i respect what have been said above, i totally agree with Arthelion.
I see myself even more radical when thinking that ophthalmology can be a seperate school just like dentistry. specialists can function better physically and cognitively when they are younger/early exposure.
The process of maturity will occur with any speciality regardless.
 

4424

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i think intern yr helped me a lot and although it's long and sometimes seems irrelevant, having a good grasp of how certain things are managed, being comfortable with very sick patients, knowing the protocols etc i find helpful. maybe years into private practice it will be less relevant but as a resident in a hospital,interacting with a lot of different services, and having pretty sick patients it's helpful. i know personally if i had to go from 4th yr med school to ophtho there's no way i would've been comfortable in understanding management, etc.