The Doom & Gloom

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I am a prospect PharmD graduate of 2014, but I haven't had any luck with finding a job yet. I did score a second interview at CVS, but no one has called back. I am looking into working for independent pharmacies because I plan to own one someday, but even that seems impossible. I have no work experience, and my GPA was just average (just above 3.0). I NEED to have a job near NYC because all my family members are here, and relocating to somewhere far just isn't an option. Can anyone help me out here?

Where should I start? Would it be ok if I take compounding next year on January instead of June?
I am soo depressed at this moment, and I am killing myself over this whole situation.
I feel like such a failure. Man. This sucks.
 

WVUPharm2007

imagine sisyphus happy
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You will need a lot of connections and a lot of luck. You are trying to get a job in one of the most desirable markets, in an employment recession, with a ton of grads starting to appear.

If at all possible, I'd look at somewhere like Southern Texas or North Dakota where the oil boom is. I know you don't want to...who does...but its better than nothing.
 
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grumps

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You will need a lot of connections and a lot of luck. You are trying to get a job in one of the most desirable markets, in an employment recession, with a ton of grads starting to appear.

If at all possible, I'd look at somewhere like Southern Texas or North Dakota where the oil boom is. I know you don't want to...who does...but its better than nothing.

Yeah go to the oil boom, but not to be a pharmacist. Be a roughneck.
 
Apr 17, 2013
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While I think it's admirable to start job hunting now, being an unlicensed pharmacy student, it may not be the best time professionally. Granted, much has changed since I was licensed, but somehow the idea of anyone offering you a job when you are an unlicensed, and as you put it, "just average" student, might be reaching. You still have a lot ahead of you before, as most like to be identified as, being a doctor. (Ridiculous, I know). Relax and enjoy this final phase of your pharmacy education.

I'm honestly much more concerned about 'you', the person. This whole 'chicken little and the sky is falling thing' is distressing. You obviously have family that you care about, so they must care about you, your getting an education and your in the NYC area. Put on a Santa hat and go look at the department store windows in the city. I doubt anyone on here can 'help' get you a job, or if they even should. Take your exams, when 'you' feel ready, not when some buffoon advises you to. All of these online schools, that flood the televised airwaves, with single mothers supporting multi-child family's, are constantly touting about career placement after graduation, so I'm guessing your pharmacy school should offer that as well. Get a tech license and work for one of the chains. Do a good job and they'll have an employee reference point, on you, for hiring when you are licensed.

Be scared, Hell I'm afraid of the dark, but using words like killing, doom, depressed, failure, et al. are really harsh for what should be one of the best times of your life. From one old pharmacist to one, soon to be pharmacist, it will all work out for you. I should know, I'm a pharmacist (not a doctor).
Much love and Happy Holidays.
 

Sparda29

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When it comes to hospitals do awesome on your rotations. Think each rotation as a 4-6 week job interview. If you can, try and do as many rotations as possible at one site. IPPE -> APPE Institutional -> APPE Internal Medicine, etc. If they don't offer you a position as an intern/grad pharmacist at least you'll get a killer recommendation for residency or for a staffing job. That's how it worked out for me. I got a recommendation from my hospital sites (albeit they were in different locations) but the director who hired me knew all of my former preceptors so I got the job. And then for my per-diem job, one of my favorite professors in school is a clinical manager there so a recommendation from him landed me that position as well.

If you're going for retail, same thing complete the IPPE and APPE community rotation at the same site. See if they offer an elective in pharmacy management where you'll pretty much be the right hand man of the DM/pharmacy supervisor and if they like you, you'll likely get yourself a position there.
 
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PharmerC

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Nov 8, 2013
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Relocating is always an option, you don't need to have a job in NYC, you want a job in NYC. 1/10 for getting me to respond.
 

Lonelypharmdstudent

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I felt that your situation would have been better had you had employment experience. That way you can ask your company if they'll hire you once you graduate.
 
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The Doom & Gloom

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Relocating is always an option, you don't need to have a job in NYC, you want a job in NYC. 1/10 for getting me to respond.
Relocating to NJ may be an option, but my fiance is a PGY-1. I have to stay within 30 mile radius of manhatten until he is done with his residency.
 
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The Doom & Gloom

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When it comes to hospitals do awesome on your rotations. Think each rotation as a 4-6 week job interview. If you can, try and do as many rotations as possible at one site. IPPE -> APPE Institutional -> APPE Internal Medicine, etc. If they don't offer you a position as an intern/grad pharmacist at least you'll get a killer recommendation for residency or for a staffing job. That's how it worked out for me. I got a recommendation from my hospital sites (albeit they were in different locations) but the director who hired me knew all of my former preceptors so I got the job. And then for my per-diem job, one of my favorite professors in school is a clinical manager there so a recommendation from him landed me that position as well.

If you're going for retail, same thing complete the IPPE and APPE community rotation at the same site. See if they offer an elective in pharmacy management where you'll pretty much be the right hand man of the DM/pharmacy supervisor and if they like you, you'll likely get yourself a position there.
Thanks a ton. This is what I hoped to do, and I am doing 4 of my APPE rotations in one hospital. But I am getting discouraged a bit because I have absolutely no work experience. Any tips besides being punctual and staying on top of my game in terms of pharmacologics? How did you communicate with your preceptors? I've always showed my preceptors the utmost repsect, but I think that sometimes makes some people uncomfortable. I do try to smile alot, but I am not the most charismatic person. If you can be more specific I would really appreciate it. Thank you in advance.
 

N974

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Relocating to NJ may be an option, but my fiance is a PGY-1. I have to stay within 30 mile radius of manhatten until he is done with his residency.
Not married and no kids I assume? You can go anywhere you need to. Your relationship is strong enough to handle it, if it is NOT then you shouldn't be engaged in the first place. You get a job, anywhere. Push for a night shift get the week on week off and commute for 6 months until a transfer opens up. Lots of people travel for work and are gone more than 50% of the time, pilots, flight attendants, sales people etc (ask me how I know).

I know this isn't how you pictured your life unfolding, here's a tip, life rarely happens the way you plan it, and even if it does, chances are it isn't necessarily the "better" path. Life is easier and more rewarding both financially and personally if you go with the "motion of the ocean" on the seas of life. You often have to tack when sailing to your destination.

These aren't $10 an hour retail jobs, these are multi-million dollar careers, treat them as such and you shall be rewarded.
 
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Sparda29

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Thanks a ton. This is what I hoped to do, and I am doing 4 of my APPE rotations in one hospital. But I am getting discouraged a bit because I have absolutely no work experience. Any tips besides being punctual and staying on top of my game in terms of pharmacologics? How did you communicate with your preceptors? I've always showed my preceptors the utmost repsect, but I think that sometimes makes some people uncomfortable. I do try to smile alot, but I am not the most charismatic person. If you can be more specific I would really appreciate it. Thank you in advance.
You don't have to know much at the beginning but you gotta show that you're willing to learn and do more than the basic necessity in terms of your duties. There were days on my IM rotations where I stayed from 5AM-11PM even though I technically was only supposed to be there from 9AM-5PM. Hell, I even did a 36 hour gig one time.

Aside from your pharmacy preceptor, get on the good side of the medical residents and attendings that you'll be working with. The attending had me giving pharmacology and kinetics lectures to the residents on numerous occasions. (Was never a part of the syllabus.)
 

spacecowgirl

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Relocating to NJ may be an option, but my fiance is a PGY-1. I have to stay within 30 mile radius of manhatten until he is done with his residency.
So what? Or your relationship will fail? Lots of people are in long-distance relationships, especially during a finite term like a residency. Go ahead right now and forget limiting yourself geographically. Your fiance will also be looking for a job in a year so who knows where you will end up. No work experience is a huge disadvantage for you.

All of the above is sound advice - treat rotations like interviews. Be knowledgeable, reliable, punctual, put 100% into every assignment, be friendly, take initiative, be resourceful, be appreciative, DO NOT COMPLAIN about workload or hours, and for God's sake be prepared (know the dress code, know the parking rules, bring your own pens and paper and calculator, wear appropriate and clean clothing - sadly all things students have not done on my rotation).
 

Angela1234

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You're not a failure. You didn't create the job situation. The only thing I am guilty of is making the wrong career choice and going into pharmacy. People are telling you to get up and move somewhere else, like it's that easy with tons of people being out of work. I did that for 2 years, yes, I had money but I was miserable. The job you do get is far from perfect. I say see if you can stay temporarily with family or the fiancée to help save on housing and get a temporary job.
 
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The Doom & Gloom

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So what? Or your relationship will fail? Lots of people are in long-distance relationships, especially during a finite term like a residency. Go ahead right now and forget limiting yourself geographically. Your fiance will also be looking for a job in a year so who knows where you will end up. No work experience is a huge disadvantage for you.

All of the above is sound advice - treat rotations like interviews. Be knowledgeable, reliable, punctual, put 100% into every assignment, be friendly, take initiative, be resourceful, be appreciative, DO NOT COMPLAIN about workload or hours, and for God's sake be prepared (know the dress code, know the parking rules, bring your own pens and paper and calculator, wear appropriate and clean clothing - sadly all things students have not done on my rotation).
My fiance is a medical resident. He still has 3.5 years to go, not taking fellowship into consideration. I guess I will have to be more flexible with the location... Thank you for the advice. I really appreciate it.
 
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The Doom & Gloom

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You're not a failure. You didn't create the job situation. The only thing I am guilty of is making the wrong career choice and going into pharmacy. People are telling you to get up and move somewhere else, like it's that easy with tons of people being out of work. I did that for 2 years, yes, I had money but I was miserable. The job you do get is far from perfect. I say see if you can stay temporarily with family or the fiancée to help save on housing and get a temporary job.
I am ok with a temporary job, per diem jobs, or anything I could get at this point. Money was never the issue; my tuition is already paid and I don't really have to worry about paying the rent, etc. I am lucky to have wealthy parents, so I am good for a few years. Right now my main concern is my lack of experience, and the fear of being jobless for years-- or being financially dependent on my parents indefinately. haha.. sounds silly, right?
 

N974

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See thread about the new grad quitting after 4 months and starting at the "unicorn" job. That's your ticket. Get a job, get experience, then you're much more marketable.


My fiance is a medical resident. He still has 3.5 years to go, not taking fellowship into consideration. I guess I will have to be more flexible with the location... Thank you for the advice. I really appreciate it.
 
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The Doom & Gloom

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You don't have to know much at the beginning but you gotta show that you're willing to learn and do more than the basic necessity in terms of your duties. There were days on my IM rotations where I stayed from 5AM-11PM even though I technically was only supposed to be there from 9AM-5PM. Hell, I even did a 36 hour gig one time.

Aside from your pharmacy preceptor, get on the good side of the medical residents and attendings that you'll be working with. The attending had me giving pharmacology and kinetics lectures to the residents on numerous occasions. (Was never a part of the syllabus.)
36 hours shift sounds insane. Wow. I, too, would have hired you if I was the pharmacy director. Kudos to you. I guess I will have to give all that I've got.
 

Sparda29

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36 hours shift sounds insane. Wow. I, too, would have hired you if I was the pharmacy director. Kudos to you. I guess I will have to give all that I've got.
It honestly wasn't that bad. Once I knew the director and clinical pharmacists left for the day, I changed into scrubs. Hung out with the medical residents in the on-call room did most of my work from there. Assisted the residents with some procedures (not sure about the legality of that). Got some sleep but whenever the residents got paged I woke up and followed them.
 

msweph

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It honestly wasn't that bad. Once I knew the director and clinical pharmacists left for the day, I changed into scrubs. Hung out with the medical residents in the on-call room did most of my work from there. Assisted the residents with some procedures (not sure about the legality of that). Got some sleep but whenever the residents got paged I woke up and followed them.
That would probably be a good experience for pharmacy students in general. It is good to know what MD/DO students do and what their residency is like.
 

Sparda29

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36 hours shift sounds insane. Wow. I, too, would have hired you if I was the pharmacy director. Kudos to you. I guess I will have to give all that I've got.
It honestly wasn't that bad. Once I knew the director and clinical pharmacists left for the day, I changed into scrubs. Hung out with the medical residents in the on-call room did most of my work from there. Assisted the residents with some procedures (not sure about the legality of that). Got some sleep but whenever the residents got paged I woke up and followed them.
That would probably be a good experience for pharmacy students in general. It is good to know what MD/DO students do and what their residency is like.
They weren't MD/DO students though, full fledged residents who already graduated medical school.
 

msweph

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It honestly wasn't that bad. Once I knew the director and clinical pharmacists left for the day, I changed into scrubs. Hung out with the medical residents in the on-call room did most of my work from there. Assisted the residents with some procedures (not sure about the legality of that). Got some sleep but whenever the residents got paged I woke up and followed them.


They weren't MD/DO students though, full fledged residents who already graduated medical school.
I know- to be a resident you have to finish medical school. I just meant what their educational process is like (both medical students and residents)
 

N974

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I am ok with a temporary job, per diem jobs, or anything I could get at this point. Money was never the issue; my tuition is already paid and I don't really have to worry about paying the rent, etc. I am lucky to have wealthy parents, so I am good for a few years. Right now my main concern is my lack of experience, and the fear of being jobless for years-- or being financially dependent on my parents indefinately. haha.. sounds silly, right?
You are very fortunate to be in that situation, and I'm sure your family is very close. It's nice to know that the American Dream is still alive for some people.

I'm not sure where your parents wealth came from, whether it was from them or someone else, but whomever first made the wealth didn't do it with your current outlook/motivation. A friend of a friends white wealthy daughter was rejected to 8 or 10 top medical schools with 4.0 averages, work, and volunteering. The reason given? "Rich white girls trying for med school are a dime a dozen and they don't want it bad enough".

I'm not knocking your decision, and I believe you even recognize the peculiarity of your position by the tone of your posts. Respectfully, somewhere along the line the wealth has made you soft. I have two young daughters and your post above has strengthened my resolve to ensure they have the tools to earn everything they achieve. If you were poor, or even if your parents were still wealthy, wouldn't let your starve, but still made you cover all your expenses, you would be in Barrow or El Paso in a heartbeat, you would have no other choice. What will you do if the money is gone? How will you be able to give your children the tools of life if you have never acquired them yourself? I'm pretty sure you and others like you would rise to the challenge if needed, but some wouldn't.

I'm not being hard on you, I would probably be the same way if I had the choice when I was younger. I only bring this up because I see this as a major challenge in raising my kids and for society in general.
 
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Apr 17, 2013
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"Respectfully, somewhere along the line the wealth has made you soft." Please forgive me, but that's a broad statement. An equal amount of children from 'good' families strive to be as good, if not better, than their circumstance. While the guest houses of many 'good' families, are littered with underachieving children (like my sister).
A person that expresses concern, due to the lack of a job offer, is hungry (not the food kind). If you don't need to work, yet you want a job, that is a hallmark of strength.

Young pharmacist to be, relax. I applaud your desire to achieve. Finish your education, finalize your boards and then go job hunting. The confidence you need to procure a job will appear, when you're a fully licensed pharmacist. Before one can disco dance, they must learn to walk.
 
Jul 2, 2013
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I am a prospect PharmD graduate of 2014, but I haven't had any luck with finding a job yet. I did score a second interview at CVS, but no one has called back. I am looking into working for independent pharmacies because I plan to own one someday, but even that seems impossible. I have no work experience, and my GPA was just average (just above 3.0). I NEED to have a job near NYC because all my family members are here, and relocating to somewhere far just isn't an option. Can anyone help me out here?

Where should I start? Would it be ok if I take compounding next year on January instead of June?
I am soo depressed at this moment, and I am killing myself over this whole situation.
I feel like such a failure. Man. This sucks.
Hey feel free to PM me. I definitely have been feeling the same way you are but it's tough to openly talk about this on the forum lol
 
Jan 28, 2013
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take a chance - move away from home - my fiance is from New York - she took a chance to move out of there to see new things, new jobs, etc. Most of her friends never left.

My first wife (probably not best to say in this situation) and I lived apart from each other for 6 months - she took a job 1000 miles away while I finished up my rotations (and this is when the job market was good 8 years ago). we survived it (divorced 5 years later - other issues.

Take a chance, go to some out of the way place, you are young, no kids, will have enough money for plane trips. I second the 7 on 7 off mentality - you will make it through it
 
Jul 24, 2013
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i know this place in queens that's hiring but that's pretty much useless since you don't have a license lol. I'm gonna hook one of my boys up. if you must get a job in NY, all you really gotta do is make friends with the right people, build your connections, and prey for a lucky break. independents aren't gonna hire you if you just walk in looking for a job. they usually like to hire people through word of mouth. A random new grad pharmacist recently came in to my pharmacy with a resume and handed it to me looking for a job. i passed it to my boss(the owner) who promptly tossed it in the trash without even glancing at it
 
Jan 20, 2014
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if you don't have kids, you can move to anywhere for a short term, i.e. NY upstate. I have school age kids and still have to consider either commuting 3 hrs a day or moving to some place temporarily until I find a job locally. Or you can wait until you get license. It will be easier to find a job when you have the license.