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Anyone use this book on the wards: P.I.M.P. Protector?

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by winsicle, Mar 27, 2007.

  1. winsicle

    winsicle Member 5+ Year Member

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    Dec 15, 2004
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  3. breaker1919

    breaker1919 Scut Monkey 2+ Year Member

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    Mar 6, 2007
    I personally haven't used it, but I've heard very good things about it. Actually, the author is an active member of SDN and can be found in the Emergency Medicine forums (he's an EM attending). He can tell you more about the book.:D
     
  4. DrQuinn

    DrQuinn My name is Neo Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Dec 6, 2000
    Wisconsin
    I wrote this book several years ago.... here is the post that I made a couple of years ago on SDN about the book as I was writing it. So far the people that have gotten the book find it very useful, I hope so!!!!!

    If you hvae any questions, please feel free to ask!

    "So, it was my intern year. I was the intern on OB/GYN, L&D floor. All of the real OB residents seemed to busy, or just didnt' seem to care to teach to the M3 students... and often times I would get an M3 who would come up to me and say "Dude, what do I need to do when I round on a patient with pre-eclampsia (or post partum, or whatever)." I looked at them incredulously, having forgotten what it was like to really have to start seeing patients on your own as an M3. So, I wrote up a quick guide for the students on the OB rotation.

    What you needed to know, pathophys wise and basic info wise on major topics (preeclampsia, post partum hemorrhage, mastitis, miscarriages, prolonged labor, PPROM, etc), what they needed to ask the patient (history), what they should look for (physical), what appropriate tests to order, and "pearls" that the OB residents and attendings always asked.

    I handed this out to the students, and they all universally loved it. It got me thinking. There should be a book like that.

    The aim of the book was to get any medical student able to know what htye need to know within 2-3 minutes of reading my book. Lets say your residents says you have to go down to the ER to admit a patient with chest pain (or lets say you're on your psych rotation and you have to write a progress note on a patient with schizophrenia or depression). You read the appropriate chapter in the book, learn what oyu need to ask on your history, what you need to find on your physical exam, what labs you should order or should have ordered, what is the general treatment of the disease, and a list of "Pearls" that people always asked on. Also included in each topic is an "evidenced based medicine" section. So, you can tell your attending/reisdent after you present your patient "we know that venous serum ammonia levels are congruent with arterial ammonia levels, contrary to what other people think. There was an article on it in Jama of 04 by Barton."

    Nice. Very handy and a smallish book to easily fit in your labcoat. And its useful on ALL your rotations (surg, family, peds, psych, IM, EM, OB, whatever)."
     
  5. deuist

    deuist Stealthfully Sarcastic Physician Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

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    Florida
    Quinn,

    Are you selling your own copies, by any chance? I thinking about buying this book in time for third year and would love an autographed version.
     
  6. DrQuinn

    DrQuinn My name is Neo Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    4,227
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    Dec 6, 2000
    Wisconsin
    Check your PM box.

    Hopefully anyone who has bought the book will find it useful. I wrote it so you can use it on all your rotations. The worst part for me for M3 year was everyone had separate books for each rotation, and that was just a pain in the butt (and not to mention expensive to buy all those books)....

    Q
     
  7. Ezekiel20

    Ezekiel20 Resident 10+ Year Member

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    Aug 18, 2005
    Sydney, NSW Australia
    Hey Quinn,

    Do you have a few scanned pages of your book as a sample?

    It sounds like a great book, but since buying the book would mean an international purchase for me, it would be great to get a feel for what this book actually looks like,

    Thanks
     
  8. deuist

    deuist Stealthfully Sarcastic Physician Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

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    Quinn,

    While the multitude of books for rotations can be a pain, are there any texts that you felt were truly useful? I've read good reviews of the Recall Series.
     
  9. DrQuinn

    DrQuinn My name is Neo Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Dec 6, 2000
    Wisconsin
    I'm working on it. Just sent an email to the publisher. Hopefully it will be up on either amazon or LWW.com (the publisher's website).

    I completely understand what you mean, and I always liked how amazon has sample pages of a lot of books!

    Quinn
     
  10. DrQuinn

    DrQuinn My name is Neo Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    4,227
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    Dec 6, 2000
    Wisconsin
    You can't really go wrong with surgical recall, its kind of the quintissential book that all students have. How useful it is, is in question, because its a LOT of reading and assumes you have a lot of time off to read it....

    For me in residency, the best books for medicine were the Tarascon Critical Care and Internal Medicine books, and the Adult Emergency Medicine book. Its also essential that you have a Tarascon Pocket Pharmacopeia and a new Sanford guide (or relatively new Sanford guide). You can usually get the pharmaocpeia and sanford free from drug reps once you get into the hospital setting.

    Q
     
  11. DrQuinn

    DrQuinn My name is Neo Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    4,227
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