loomis

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Hi everybody,
My friend forwarded this to me, from medscape's medpulse:


From the Editor

A study released in JAMA reports that applications to medical schools have declined for
the fifth straight year. Meanwhile, the number of international graduates seeking
certification in the United States continues to drop. Look under "News" to find out more.

Have your own theory about the fall-off in enrollment? Email [email protected] .
For technical concerns, contact the address below. [email protected]

Mindy Hung
Editor, Medscape Med Student

I went to JAMA and didn't find any thing mentioning this.....so no hard numbers yet. If and when I find the actual data, I'll post it.
I'm not applying till next year but hopefully this will be good for all of you applying this year. GOOD LUCK!!!:clap:
 

Random Access

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From reading, basically kids these days just want the cash money, without doing all the work for it.

I was reading an article about how no one wants to do surgery any more. One of the theories was that current generations don't have the work ethics of past generations. Basically, the idea is that kids these days are lazy and don't want to go through essentially 8-11 years of school after college.

Note that this isn't my opinion, just those of the articles I have read.

-RA
 

DesiDentist

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There are much better opportunities than being physicians. People aren't necessarily lazy, but this isn't twenty years ago when only lawyers and physicians make the top 1% of earners. Not only are people are looking at money as a factor, but also comfort and peace of mind. The numbers will continue to drop until the government does something to attract people into the profession.

DesiDentist
 
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Kovox

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I don't understand the drop of number of applicants per year. Is it because of the high cost of malpractice insurance? Is it because of HMOs?

I mean, my physician told me medicine isn't as lucrative anymore but he is earing like 125k a year. . . I think that's still good.
 

DesiDentist

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Just think 125,000 is not much when you have toiled at least 8 years after college to get your degree. Also, malpractice is a huge issue, so is HMO's. 10-15 years ago the same doctor was probably earning double that figure at least 250,000. So working 60 hours a week and making that is not attractive.

If you were to look at the dental profession. An average dentist works only 32 hours a week and makes around 140,000 a year. Now you tell me which one seems more attractive?

DesiDentist
 

Kovox

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Dentists make that much?

I was figured they would make less. I always thought there were more dentists than needed right now.

Even though the number of applicants have dropped, the average GPA and MCAT still remains the same so there really isn't an advantage but for those who have high GPA/MCAT and no volunteer experience to get in easier.
 

lady bug

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Originally posted by Kovox

I mean, my physician told me medicine isn't as lucrative anymore but he is earing like 125k a year. . . I think that's still good.
125 K a year is not a lot considering the years and stress of training you have to go through in becoming a physician. ob/gyns in florida pay 120 K in just malpractice insurance each year! something to think about.....
 

athena21

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people don't want to go into medicine anymore because they can get prestige and money from business. I know one guy whose starting salary out of college as an investment banker was $90,000. Now, he's got no debt, does a job he loves, has the prestige of business, and is living with lots o money...sounds tempting to me...
 

2badr

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Originally posted by athena21
people don't want to go into medicine anymore because they can get prestige and money from business. I know one guy whose starting salary out of college as an investment banker was $90,000. Now, he's got no debt, does a job he loves, has the prestige of business, and is living with lots o money...sounds tempting to me...
It does sound tempting.But I cannot imagine going to bed at night and not lovimg or at least liking what I do.I think all of the professions mentioned are wonderful.They just happen to be ones that i personally would not be interested in.I like the field of healthcare.And I believe that the fulfillment I recieve from doing something I like will outweigh any negatives that might come along.Of course common sense should figure into it.With student loans over 100 thousand or more,it would be hard to have a peaceful night's sleep if you only made $30000 a year!
Do what you love to do.And who cares whether someone else thinks your job has prestige? It's your life not theirs.The prestige is really a personal point of veiw.If you enjoy it hopefully the rest will follow.It is simply an unwise decision to do a job for the money *alone*.
Then again if you can more power to you!:)
 

medicine2006

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Part of the problem is backstabbing doctors that work for lawyers. They get a fee for being a so-called "expert witness" against their peers in malpractive suits. Get rid of the ambulance chasers and expert witnesses and phyisicians make more money and patients have more choices and less cost.

What am I talking about you ask? If you are an ob/gyn your insurer often asked you to limit the amount of deliveries you can perform and also discourages you from too many high-risk cases. This leads to less quality access to care.

Just my 2 cents.
 
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