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Applying for grants before acceptance

Discussion in 'Physician Scientists' started by Stixman28, May 12, 2007.

  1. Stixman28

    Stixman28 Medical Scientician
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    My mentor told me to apply for a grant to fund my PhD years now, before I have even been accepted to any program. (Ill be applying next cycle) Does anyone know what grants are available to MD/PhD students before they've been accepted to a program?

    I know they're out there because Ive seen folks on mdapps with the grants ahead of time...

    (this might be a duplicate, sorry)
     
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  3. InNotOf

    InNotOf Member
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    I'd like to know, too.
     
  4. GoinBack2Cali?

    GoinBack2Cali? it used to be so cool
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    maybe he is talking about pre-doctoral fellowships

    but do you really want to jinx yourself? :eek:
     
  5. Stixman28

    Stixman28 Medical Scientician
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    jinx by assuming Ill get in somewhere? I figured it could be an asset to my application both to MSTP and non-mstp programs. It will take a burden off the school's responsibility to me and they will be able to stretch their grants further.

    whatd you think?
     
  6. jjmack

    jjmack Senior Member
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    i assume the people who have grant before have serious full time research before they apply.
     
  7. Hard24Get

    Hard24Get The black sleepymed
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    This doesn't sound doable to me, because most of these grants require institutional support, and you won't know what institution. Moreover, this won't help MSTP schools, because the NIH gives them a set source of money for your MD years, and you are not allowed to have 2 government grants at the same time (and non-government grants of that kind don't really exist as far as I know). It is your advisor's responsibility to help you get funded during your PhD years, and you can't defer the grant for the 2 years you will be in med school, anyway. The best thing you can do is to start writing one your 2nd year as soon as you get in the lab, though usually there is already a fellowship slot your PI knows about that you can slip right into. If you still want to try, maybe check out this link.
    . Good luck!
     
  8. tacojohn

    tacojohn Membership Revoked
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    I agree with the previous poster. Your chances of getting funding without a mentor, research lab, or definitive project are next to none. If you need funding as a student, work hard on your projects, read up on current related research, and get help writing a decent proposal after you join a lab and are in it for a few months.
     
  9. Stixman28

    Stixman28 Medical Scientician
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    So I do have extensive research in her lab...

    Maybe what she meant is write up a grant with my current project or where its leading, as a grant to be used in her lab, if I get accepted to her school.

    Do you think that will jeopardize my applications to other schools. It almost sounds like applying to an MD/PhD program after having just started a PhD. Ill ask her more, but hope to keep this topic open.
     
  10. solitude

    solitude Senior Member
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    Something to keep in mind is that it's generally frowned upon when one does his/her PhD in the same lab where he/she worked as an undergrad (or a tech, or a Master's student, etc.).

    I don't think this would jeopardize your applications to other schools. If she wants you to apply for it, go ahead, but I would recommend switching labs, and even institutions for that matter.
     
  11. Stixman28

    Stixman28 Medical Scientician
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    Frowned upon? Really?

    Can anyone else back this statement up? Whether or not I continue research at this school, I plan to continue research on a very similar topic...who's frowning on commitment?

    Or is it supposed that one is cutting out thesis research by having developed research before the PhD begins? do we call that cheating?
     
  12. GoinBack2Cali?

    GoinBack2Cali? it used to be so cool
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    I have definitely heard that it is frowned upon to both stay at the same school and even more to continue previous research. I think that the point of the PhD is to develop the thought process to take an idea/question and do the necessary work to find the answer. I wouldn't consider what you want cheating, more like non-creative or maybe the east way out (not the point of a PhD), and I believe that it what is frowned upon. What the research actually is, isn't the point of the PhD, the point is to have an intense research experience.
     
  13. jeniffer lopez

    jeniffer lopez La butifarra
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    Really? I thought there was a fair amount of inbreeding at some MD/PhD programs (Harvard's MD/PhD comes to mind), and I know of people who have continued projects they started as undergrads and have been quite successful
     
  14. tacojohn

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    I think it's generally believed that most institutions will want to bring in students who have experience from outside of their own departments. They also want to boost their own reputations by ensuring that they can place students elsewhere. From the student's perspective, I would consider it to be a bad move to stay in the same lab but moving to a different department at the same institution wouldn't necessarily be a bad move at all.
     
  15. Myempire1

    Myempire1 Junior Member
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    Writing and submitting an NRSA (or equivalent) is no cake-walk. It can take months to write it, submit it, get rejected, revise it, and then resubmit it.

    Either way, make sure you are eligible first. Below are the eligibility requirements for a F31 NRSA. You can google it and go to the NIH website for more info.

    ____________________________
    1. Eligible Applicants
    1.A. Eligible Institutions
    You may submit (an) application(s) if your organization has any of the following characteristics:
    * For-profit organizations
    * Non-profit organizations
    * Public or private institutions, such as universities, colleges, hospitals, and laboratories
    * Eligible agencies and labs of the Federal government including NIH intramural labs
    * Domestic institutions
    * Foreign institutions
    The sponsoring institution must have adequate faculty and facilities available on site to provide a suitable environment for performing high-quality research training. Applicants requesting fellowship support for foreign research training must demonstrate in the application that the foreign institution and sponsor offer unique opportunities and clear scientific advantages that are not currently available in the United States. Only if there is a clear scientific advantage will foreign training be supported.
    1.B. Eligible Individuals
    Any individual with the skills, knowledge, and resources necessary to carry out the proposed research training is invited to work with his/her sponsor and institution to develop an application for support. Individuals from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, individuals with disabilities, and individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds may also be eligible to apply for the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards for Individual Predoctoral Fellowships (F31) to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research (PA-06-481).
    The applicant must be at the dissertation research stage of their training and must show evidence of both high academic performance in the sciences and substantial interest in a research area of high priority to the participating Institutes.
    Participating Institutes may have different eligibility requirements for individuals applying for a Kirschstein-NRSA F31 award. Additional information and requirements specific to a particular Institute are located at the F31 contact website
    Citizenship: By the time of award, the individual applicant must be a citizen or a non-citizen national of the United States or have been lawfully admitted for permanent residence (i.e., possess a currently valid Alien Registration Receipt Card I-551, or other legal verification of such status). Non-citizen nationals are generally persons born in outlying possessions of the United States (i.e., American Samoa and Swains Island). Individuals on temporary or student visas are not eligible. Individuals may apply for the Kirschstein-NRSA F31 in advance of admission to the United States as a Permanent Resident recognizing that no award will be made until legal verification of Permanent Resident status is provided.
    Degree Requirements: An applicant must have a baccalaureate degree and be currently enrolled in a Ph.D. or equivalent research degree program (e.g., Eng.D., D.N.Sc., Dr. P.H., D.S.W., Pharm.D., Psy.D., Sc.D.), a formally combined M.D./Ph.D. program, or other combined professional/clinical doctoral/research Ph.D. graduate program (e.g., D.D.S./Ph.D.) in the biomedical, behavioral, or clinical sciences at an accredited domestic or foreign institution. With the exception of the combined degree programs described above, the Kirschstein-NRSA F31 may not be used to support studies leading to the M.D., D.D.S., or other clinical, health-professional training (e.g., D.C., D.M.D., D.N.P., D.O., D.P.M., D.V.M., N.D., O.D.).
     

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