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Applying to Texas schools before vs. after residency

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isham55

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Hi all, I'm entering my senior year of university and was wondering if I should apply to the Texas DDS programs before or after establishing my residency.

Just for some background, I'm an Illinois resident who plans on moving to Texas after undergrad to establish residency there for a better shot at the Texas dental schools. Is it worth applying to the schools before my 1-year residency is established (as OOS first) and then reapply as IS if I get rejected, or should I just apply [for the first time] after the 1-year residency period as an IS applicant?
If it helps:
-cGPA = 3.86
-sGPA = 3.8
-taking the DAT this summer
-leadership experience from both school and retail work
-90+ hours of shadowing
-volunteer experience at a dental school

I also plan to shadow more & volunteer with non-health organizations that work with the underserved after I move (due to the pandemic situation this summer). I also have some experience volunteering in Texas due to traveling there twice a year to visit family. I feel that I won't have a shot unless I get a stellar DAT score like a 26 lol so I thought it would be better to wait and apply the first time as IS. Any thoughts/insights?
 
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RYost234

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The search function is pretty cool, you should try it. If you apply to Texas schools without residency you're basically donating your money away
 

isham55

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The search function is pretty cool, you should try it. If you apply to Texas schools without residency you're basically donating your money away
My question was more specific than that lmfao no need to be petty.
 

RYost234

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Not being petty it's just pretty annoying seeing the same questions over and over when there's been dozens of posts on the exact topic

Edit: you can have a 4.0 and a 30 dat and it's still unlikely you'd get into a Texas school if you're not a resident
 

isham55

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Not being petty it's just pretty annoying seeing the same questions over and over when there's been dozens of posts on the exact topic
Only reason I asked was because I wanted to know if my specific stats with a DAT score of ~21-22 would give me a shot, and I don't see anything wrong in asking.
 

RYost234

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Only reason I asked was because I wanted to know if my specific stats with a DAT score of ~21-22 would give me a shot, and I don't see anything wrong in asking.

Not trying to put you down just trying to be super realistic; the odds are extremely against anyone not living in Texas. If you have extra money to spare throw them in if you want, prove me wrong! Good luck
 

Faris_

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Unfortunately, for you, applying to Texas without a residency already puts you at a great disadvantage assuming you already have a better application than the majority of those applying from Texas. I know people see the state schools' tuition rates and get hard ons but the reason they are low is because of state funding and this state funding is tied with a high percentage of acceptance to state residents. Dental schools in Texas cost just as much as anywhere else only the state of Texas is paying the difference after tuition and I assure you Texas isn't doing that so someone from Mississippi can get expensive education on its expense.
 
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piratewow

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Out of state person that is currently attending a texas school, I became a resident but not until after interviews rolled out. I think you do need a high DAT(24+ of the n=3 I know) or significant connections (marriage,alumni), generally each school takes 0-5 OOS per yr. Honestly, a 21-22 wouldn't cut it, that's basically the upper end of average for in-state people.Also if you applied this year, your app probably wouldn't be considered complete until mid summer, which while not bad isn't early. I think you would have good chances as a resident though.
 
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isham55

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Unfortunately, for you, applying to Texas without a residency already puts you at a great disadvantage assuming you already have a better application than the majority of those applying from Texas. I know people see the state schools' tuition rates and get hard ons but the reason they are low is because of state funding and this state funding is tied with a high percentage of acceptance to state residents. Dental schools in Texas cost just as much as anywhere else only the state of Texas is paying the difference after tuition and I assure you Texas isn't doing that so someone from Mississippi can get expensive education on its expense.
I'm from Chicago and my state schools' resident tuitions are more expensive than the Texas schools' non-resident tuitions, which is one of several reasons I don't see myself studying here. I think it's better to just establish my Texas residency first then. Thanks for sharing!
 
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isham55

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Out of state person that is currently attending a texas school, I became a resident but not until after interviews rolled out. I think you do need a high DAT(24+ of the n=3 I know) or significant connections (marriage,alumni), generally each school takes 0-5 OOS per yr. Honestly, a 21-22 wouldn't cut it, that's basically the upper end of average for in-state people.Also if you applied this year, your app probably wouldn't be considered complete until mid summer, which while not bad isn't early. I think you would have good chances as a resident though.
I'll stick to establishing my residency first, and that will be during my gap year after this last year of undergrad.
 
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