Are you worried that you might fail?

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How concerned/anxious are you about failing out 1st year for academic reasons?

  • I really don't consider it a legitimate possibility.

    Votes: 46 33.8%
  • The possibility has crossed my mind, but I have NO reason to think I would.

    Votes: 55 40.4%
  • I wonder about one or more of my cognitiv abilities, but I think i'll be fine.

    Votes: 24 17.6%
  • Failing out in my 1st year of medical school for academic reasons is a significant concern of mine.

    Votes: 11 8.1%

  • Total voters
    136

majahops

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A question for those premeds who have been accepted to a medical school.

Please answer honestly regarding how you feel about the FIRST YEAR OF MEDICAL SCHOOL.

It's anonymous. So please, again, be honest.

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Allopathic medical schools have graduation rates around 96%, and many of those who end up not graduating do so because they choose to exit the field for another opportunity rather than fail out. As long as I study hard, keep my head on my shoulders, and avoid burning out I do not expect to see a problem. It might not be a cakewalk, but failure is unlikely.

How about yourself?
 
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I interpreted his question as asking whether or not we would fail a semester in undergrad. Though my senioritis is somewhat crippling, I think I can do well enough to graduate.

I think originally there was a large block of text specifying failing out of med school, but it seems to have disappeared.

I don't worry about failing. I just worry about getting up to speed.:thumbup:
 
I'm not looking for statistics or citations from articles. We've all seen them. I'm looking for real, individual, PERSONAL concerns of YOURS (or lack thereof).

Also, I realize I spelled cognitive "cognitiv," and how ironic that is. :)
 
When we started, our Dean told the whole class in a welcome lecture, that we would all become physicians unless we personally chose not too. I guess my school puts a lot of faith in who they choose to attend.

And it was never a concern of mine. I guess it could have entered my mind, but it was never an option.
 
I'm not worried at all that I will fail, but I do think I am going to struggle managing my time more efficiently.

edit: the 1st post changed every time I refreshed the page. I think I refreshed four times, but may be it was 5.
 
Failing isn't a real concern of mine.

But not doing well in school or boards and subsequently being forced into a residency I don't care for is definitely a concern.
 
Maybe i'm too "up beat" but I never consider failing in anything I do. I never take a test or try anything with the idea that I might fail it. I don't think it helps (at least for me personally) to think about failing something and therefore it is a waste of time.

So no I don't worry that i'll fail. Could I fail? Of course but worrying won't make me try harder not to, I'll try regardless.
 
I think I'll struggle at first. I hope to adjust accordingly like I have against almost every other challenge I've faced thus far in my lifetime.
 
A question for those premeds who have been accepted to a medical school.

Please answer honestly regarding how you feel about the FIRST YEAR OF MEDICAL SCHOOL.

It's anonymous. So please, again, be honest.

Fail? No. Remember the material after Step 1? Yes. Being a competent doctor? I will try my best if given the chance.

My main concerns about a career as a doctor is three fold: 1) not having enough time to spend with my wife and not being able to enjoy football, 2) not being a good doctor (not catching misdiagnosis, having the ability to give the "right" diagnosis, etc, 3) not liking being a doctor.
 
Fail? No. Remember the material after Step 1? Yes. Being a competent doctor? I will try my best if given the chance.

My main concerns about a career as a doctor is three fold: 1) not having enough time to spend with my wife and not being able to enjoy football, 2) not being a good doctor (not catching misdiagnosis, having the ability to give the "right" diagnosis, etc, 3) not liking being a doctor.

Damn you must like football a lot. I'm concerned about my leadership capabilities and my ability to perform at a high level on limited rest.
 
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Damn you must like football a lot. I'm concerned about my leadership capabilities and my ability to perform at a high level on limited rest.

Yes, I love football. Sure being a doctor is a great thing and all, but we only live once. There is no point in having a career that takes away all of the stuff that you love in life (outside of the job). It just ins't worth it! The field that I'm interested in has "normal" work hours and very few weekend hours. If I don't get into medical school I will get a Ph.D. in the same field and do the lab work for diagnosing the patients (lab tests are ordered by the doctor, the scientist sends back the test results -- diagnosis--).

The fear of not being able to enjoy those fall Saturdays with college football is what scares me the most. I grew up playing football in high school (was not good enough to get a D-1 college scholarship) and I volunteered as a high school coach for a couple of years.

I've told a few people about this exact fear and they tend to make fun of me for it (other pre-meds).

I don't think it is possible to coach high school football and be a doctor at the same time.

Edit: The field I'm interested in is not competitive (they didn't fill all of the residency spots in the last match), but there are only a few jobs.
 
Being a high school football coach is actually one of my dreams. I feel you completely man.

Yes, I love football. Sure being a doctor is a great thing and all, but we only live once. There is no point in having a career that takes away all of the stuff that you love in life (outside of the job). It just ins't worth it! The field that I'm interested in has "normal" work hours and very few weekend hours. If I don't get into medical school I will get a Ph.D. in the same field and do the lab work for diagnosing the patients (lab tests are ordered by the doctor, the scientist sends back the test results -- diagnosis--).

The fear of not being able to enjoy those fall Saturdays with college football is what scares me the most. I grew up playing football in high school (was not good enough to get a D-1 college scholarship) and I volunteered as a high school coach for a couple of years.

I've told a few people about this exact fear and they tend to make fun of me for it (other pre-meds).

I don't think it is possible to coach high school football and be a doctor at the same time.

Edit: The field I'm interested in is not competitive (they didn't fill all of the residency spots in the last match), but there are only a few jobs.
 
Hey man, if football is your passion...and it sounds like it is, more power to you. I much prefer hobbies and interests outside of the typical pre-med prescription.

Basketball is my sport, I play around 5 times a week. I won't be able to keep this up when med school starts in the fall...probably the beginning of the end of my hoops addiction :(

In the end, sacrifices will have to be made. To what extent, I don't know. But you just have to figure out if your professional development is worth each sacrifice... There will be things I won't compromise, but many other things will just have to go.
 
Being a high school football coach is actually one of my dreams. I feel you completely man.

Football is my second love (outside of family). The subject matter, which is why I want to become a doctor, is my first love. So it is a battle. One can love to coach football, but if they don't have the right skills, they won't have a job. The same goes with being a doctor.

At the end of the day, it comes down to what you want out of life. Life is what you make of it.
 
A person can always pull a Mike Leech. Try out the professional school thing and it that career is not worth it for you, go into coaching.

Right now I get my enjoyment with playing college football on X-box 360.
 
My problem is that I am too accustomed to cramming... you cannot succeed in medicine if you cram, and as a result, I am afraid of how med school will be... Even for ochem I studied one or two days before the test when I just did all the assigned problems and read the book, and I just rode the curve and still managed to get an A. For the rest of my classes, it was no exception. As a result, I never learned how to study a little bit every day. Am I the only one who feels like this?
 
My problem is that I am too accustomed to cramming... you cannot succeed in medicine if you cram, and as a result, I am afraid of how med school will be... Even for ochem I studied one or two days before the test when I just did all the assigned problems and read the book, and I just rode the curve and still managed to get an A. For the rest of my classes, it was no exception. As a result, I never learned how to study a little bit every day. Am I the only one who feels like this?

Correct, cramming in medical school does not work (from what medical students say). I got copies of all of the course objectives from an old high school friend and several of these course objectives are a good 200 page, single spaced, word documents (and this is just an outline).
 
See. I'm the opposite. I got A's by studying all the time. I am deathly afraid of what is going to happen when a bunch of YOU's start taking school seriously and studying a lot more. You'll be ascending toward your ceiling, while I fear I'll be stuck at mine?

My problem is that I am too accustomed to cramming... you cannot succeed in medicine if you cram, and as a result, I am afraid of how med school will be... Even for ochem I studied one or two days before the test when I just did all the assigned problems and read the book, and I just rode the curve and still managed to get an A. For the rest of my classes, it was no exception. As a result, I never learned how to study a little bit every day. Am I the only one who feels like this?
 
My problem is that I am too accustomed to cramming... you cannot succeed in medicine if you cram, and as a result, I am afraid of how med school will be... Even for ochem I studied one or two days before the test when I just did all the assigned problems and read the book, and I just rode the curve and still managed to get an A. For the rest of my classes, it was no exception. As a result, I never learned how to study a little bit every day. Am I the only one who feels like this?

Is the curve really that easy to ride at ucla?
 
I am too big to fail.
sumo-kid.jpg





So, no, i'm not worried. However, I do plan on taking my studies more seriously.
 
From what I have seen as a medical student, the people who went in worrying were the ones who did the worst. They never stop worrying either, and waste a lot of time in the process.

My advise is to worry less and just suck it up. Med school is not that hard, although some will find it more or less so than others. Time consuming, yes. When people worry about these things it seems like it drops their confidence. There is a part of them that doesn't believe that they can do it, which can lead to disappointment.

I was as average an applicant as they come, and I was blessed with a late waitlist acceptance at an MD school. I had every reason to worry about not being "good" enough for med school, since I barley got in. I went in with a belief that I would never have to worry about passing because I was confident in myself, and I knew that if need be I woud be able to work harder for it. This has put me easily into the top 1/3 of my class.

Worrying is just time wasted..... and time is too valuable a thing to be thrown away at this stage
 
Yo... a first year here checking in. I figured I could help in this situation.

I had a little fear of med school. It was an unknown to me. I didn't know what to expect, how hard I'd have to try, how difficult the material was, how much time it would be etc. And quite frankly, I don't think you can ever really be prepared for it. It's just something you've got to do to understand.

However, many people have been through this process. And I don't care what school you go to, anatomy is anatomy, and med students are med students, and many experiences are universal. Everyone else feels anxious, nervous, excited but a little scared, and the vast majority of people make it through the experience to emerge as competent doctors. If they can do it, you can do it. I'm half way through first year, and to be honest I was completely naive and clueless to what it would take to succeed. But I've found my groove and I'm doing well. You will eventually figure out what works for you and figure out how to make it through this process like many have done before you, many are doing with you, and many will do after you.

Whatever happens, have as much fun as you can and try and enjoy every moment. I'm having the time of my life. I was oblivious to how much crazy stuff we are doing in science. Pretty much if you can think of it, someone is trying it. My schools curriculum is pretty chill, but I can imagine how difficult it could be, so make sure you find a way to enjoy your time. Congrats on making it this far and good luck yall.
 
I personally thrive on fear and pressure. I have no fears about passing for I'm certain that passing will not be too difficult for me but the fear of not achieving the level of success I have set out to accomplish (becoming a world-renowned surgeon :D) is what drove me to work hard in undergrad and what will prob carry me through Medical School.
 
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My problem is that I am too accustomed to cramming... you cannot succeed in medicine if you cram, and as a result, I am afraid of how med school will be... Even for ochem I studied one or two days before the test when I just did all the assigned problems and read the book, and I just rode the curve and still managed to get an A. For the rest of my classes, it was no exception. As a result, I never learned how to study a little bit every day. Am I the only one who feels like this?
This REALLY depends on the school's curriculum and your personal study habits.
 
Hands too unsteady to be a capable surgeeon? Sure.

Not as good and caring a person as other marticulants? Who knows?

End up failing as a phyisican because of personality flaws? Could happen.

Fail first-year med-school classes after having gone through this process? Hell no, inconceivable.
 
My problem is that I am too accustomed to cramming... you cannot succeed in medicine if you cram, and as a result, I am afraid of how med school will be... Even for ochem I studied one or two days before the test when I just did all the assigned problems and read the book, and I just rode the curve and still managed to get an A. For the rest of my classes, it was no exception. As a result, I never learned how to study a little bit every day. Am I the only one who feels like this?

I can relate completely. I think its time to change these habits or a massive wake-up call is in order come this fall :eek:
 
I got A's by studying all the time. I am deathly afraid of what is going to happen when a bunch of YOU's start taking school seriously and studying a lot more. You'll be ascending toward your ceiling, while I fear I'll be stuck at mine?

I've expressed this concern several times on SDN, but have never really had anyone comment on whether they've seen someone in a similar circumstance coming into medical school (and how they faired) or even express feelings on it any way.

It seems like people are always ready to comment on the "working harder when the going gets tough" issue... but not really at all on what to do if you were working all the time as an undergrad and "harder" doesn't seem to be the likely resolution.

Just kind of scary for me... because it suggests I represent a tiny minority of incoming medical students...
 
I've expressed this concern several times on SDN, but have never really had anyone comment on whether they've seen someone in a similar circumstance coming into medical school (and how they faired) or even express feelings on it any way.

It seems like people are always ready to comment on the "working harder when the going gets tough" issue... but not really at all on what to do if you were working all the time as an undergrad and "harder" doesn't seem to be the likely resolution.

Just kind of scary for me... because it suggests I represent a tiny minority of incoming medical students...

Ive just never met any succesful pre-meds who werent working hard in undergrad. i didnt think orgo was something you can just breeze through on smarts ...
 
I've expressed this concern several times on SDN, but have never really had anyone comment on whether they've seen someone in a similar circumstance coming into medical school (and how they faired) or even express feelings on it any way.

It seems like people are always ready to comment on the "working harder when the going gets tough" issue... but not really at all on what to do if you were working all the time as an undergrad and "harder" doesn't seem to be the likely resolution.

Just kind of scary for me... because it suggests I represent a tiny minority of incoming medical students...
Yo man, the material isn't THAT bad. I've definitely taken more difficult and in depth courses. The problem is that its just so much stuff and it's really a matter of getting through all of the material, rather than being able to understand it. I know some people that study a lot, I know some people that study less. The key thing is to find a regimen that works for you. I still haven't fine tuned my study tactics and continue to experiment with new strategies to see what works and what doesn't. But you will be fine. I know some people that claimed they worked harder in undergrad, it really depends on what school you go to, the curriculum, and how quickly you get the hang of things.
 
First off, thank you both very much. I really appreciate the responses. However, I should have noted that the reason I spent so much time studying as an undergrad wasn't because concepts were difficult for me to grasp, but because bits of information seem to take me longer to encode into memory... so, even with a light science course load in undergraduate classes, it was the volume of work that I had a problem with (rote memorization of lists like memorizing "5 things that differ between eurkayotic and prokaryotic cells"... things where I can explain the concepts as well as my classmates, but just can't remember #3 and #5 on that list without going over and over them)... from your statement, this doesn't seem to bode well for me...
 
Ive just never met any succesful pre-meds who werent working hard in undergrad. i didnt think orgo was something you can just breeze through on smarts ...

There are plenty of pre-meds who will never become medical students, and there are plenty of medical students who were never pre-meds.

As for orgo, of course you can get by without hard work. I'm sure you can find loads of organic chemists and faculty who found introductory organic chemistry trivial and often insulting. Which, of course, is not surprising, considering that the average test grade in my organic (for chemistry majors) classes was generally less than 50% and that an 81% got an A+.
 
First off, thank you both very much. I really appreciate the responses. However, I should have noted that the reason I spent so much time studying as an undergrad wasn't because concepts were difficult for me to grasp, but because bits of information seem to take me longer to encode into memory... so, even with a light science course load in undergraduate classes, it was the volume of work that I had a problem with (rote memorization of lists like memorizing "5 things that differ between eurkayotic and prokaryotic cells"... things where I can explain the concepts as well as my classmates, but just can't remember #3 and #5 on that list without going over and over them)... from your statement, this doesn't seem to bode well for me...

I think for people like you (and the many others who are like you, I imagine) the trick will be to become more efficient, rather than studying more. I really think you'll surprise yourself and will find more efficient ways to study and memorize what has to be memorized, while forgoing what isn't entirely necessary. I know plenty of people who worked their butts off in college, went to med school, and are working equally hard and doing equally well, just because they've learned to study BETTER.
 
:) Thanks doll. :)

I think for people like you (and the many others who are like you, I imagine) the trick will be to become more efficient, rather than studying more. I really think you'll surprise yourself and will find more efficient ways to study and memorize what has to be memorized, while forgoing what isn't entirely necessary. I know plenty of people who worked their butts off in college, went to med school, and are working equally hard and doing equally well, just because they've learned to study BETTER.
 
Every day that passes I become more and more convinced that I will be a part of the 4% who fail out.
 
Its definitely crossed my mind, but I have no idea. I guess I will have to wait until I get there.
 
A question for those premeds who have been accepted to a medical school.

Please answer honestly regarding how you feel about the FIRST YEAR OF MEDICAL SCHOOL.

It's anonymous. So please, again, be honest.

The vast majority (far greater than 90%) of students who are accepted into medical school graduate. Yes, you might fail a test (or even a class) but there are opportunities for remediation and most people who gain acceptance, stay in medical school with the skills set that got them there in the first place.

You adjust for the volume of material and study on a regular basis. Some of the people who loved to "cram" at the last minute learn that they have more of an adjustment but they get the job done in the end. Many people who even fail a quiz, test or course remediate and graduate with no further problems.

The vast majority of people who fail have something (personal illness or family illness etc) that interferes with them being able to put in the study time that they need to master the curriculum. These folks are a minority of medical students but things do happen that are beyond one's control. They get the assistance that they need and go on to have great careers.

Thing to worry about: having a pile of money and finding a close and convenient place to live during first year. After that, you just have to get the work done by adjusting up for the volume. The odds are strongly in your favor if you get the acceptance letter in the first place.
 
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