KDBuff

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Jan 16, 2002
142
0
SF
Status (Visible)
I posted this thread in the military forum, but I thought I might be able to get some good insight from those more involved specifically with the dental HPSP.

I've been selected for both the Army and Navy HPSP for dental school, and am trying to decide which is the best choice for me. I am leaning toward the Navy because I have heard that work and living conditions would be better, as well as locations.

Is anyone aware if the programs differ, and what they offer are different in any way? They seem to be identical to me, but maybe there is something I'm missing. Any feedback would really be appreciated, this is a very tough, important decision for me. Thanks,

Kevin
 

init4damoney

Membership Revoked
Removed
15+ Year Member
Oct 15, 2003
173
0
So Cal
Status (Visible)
I'm not 100% sure on this, but isn't there the chance of being stuck on a ship for 6 months with a crew if you join the Navy? If so, Army/Air Force here I come!
 

Midoc

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
May 18, 2003
319
2
41
Camp Adder, Iraq
Status (Visible)
  1. Dentist
There are no major differences in the programs. You would have to speak to current/former officers in each branch to see if there were are any major differences in the active duty aspect of it.
 
About the Ads

Calculus1

G.V. Black Fan
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Feb 26, 2004
301
0
Dallas, TX
Status (Visible)
This probably won't help any, but I went with the Army because I talked to about 10 dentists who have been that program (Army)as well as a couple that are currently in D school and they all love it. I have not, however, even met a former or current Navy dentist.

2LT Calculus1
Baylor '08
 

KDBuff

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Jan 16, 2002
142
0
SF
Status (Visible)
I've gotten the feeling that the army has a lot more positions in it's dental corp than the navy due to greater number of patients.

From navy dentists I've spoke with, most seemed to enjoy their time. I'm having a tough time with my decision of whether to go into the military or not. I think it's a financial blessing, but I'm a little worried about being stuck placing monster amalgams for 8 hours a day.
 

UBTom

Class '04 official geezer
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Jul 24, 2002
1,459
4
Queens, NY
www.iloveny.com
Status (Visible)
Heya KDBuff,

As of now, the Navy Dental Corps actually has a bigger patient pool than the Army.. That's because Navy dentists treat both Navy and Marine Corps personnel and dependents, and the Navy and Marine Corps put together have more active-duty people than the Army.

If you choose the Navy, just be aware that you will likely have to serve tours of duty with the fleet-- 6 month cruises aboard a major combatant, such as an aircraft carrier or amphibious assault ship.

HTH!
 

KDBuff

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Jan 16, 2002
142
0
SF
Status (Visible)
Tom,

How much truth is there to the fact that Navy dentists spend a lot of time on ships? I good friend of the dentist I work for was in the Navy, and he said that would probably only happen if I wanted the opportunity or if I pissed someone off.

In order for anyone to be sent to sea, they first have to be physically fit, and this inlcudes dental needs. If this is true, there would need to be someone on board to deal with emergencies, but not a lot of dental care would be required. It is Navy dentists on base that get them ready to go. This is a legitimate concern for me, though I could handle one or two six month tours over my three years if necessary.
 

UBTom

Class '04 official geezer
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Jul 24, 2002
1,459
4
Queens, NY
www.iloveny.com
Status (Visible)
Hi KDBuff,

Right now, a larger portion of the Navy's battle forces are deployed than in the past due to the war on terrorism, so newly-minted Navy dentists DO stand a greater chance than usual in getting the call to serve sea duty. The Navy deploys you where it needs you most.

Things might be different three years from now when you graduate, but just don't be surprised if you do have to go on a cruise or two.

For those who want to advance in rank and pay grade, promotion board requirements need to be fulfilled, and that would most certainly include tours of duty with the fleet.

There is certainly a need for dentists to be deployed at sea... A couple of instructors at my school who were Navy dentists can attest to that-- In a typical carrier battle group that deploys for a 6-month cruise, there are about 8,000 people manning at least 12 major combatant ships (the carrier and its escorting cruisers, destroyers, frigates and fast-attack subs, plus the underway replenishment supply ships), and another 6,000 Marines in an attached amphibious group. Your typical sailor and young Marine are barely past their teens, work 12 hours or more a day, and at the end of a watch they get so bone tired they drop in the bunk first thing and oral hygiene is not the highest of priorities. You will be VERY busy as a dentist aboard a carrier on which a battle group is centered, that's for sure. :D

HTH!
 

UBTom

Class '04 official geezer
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Jul 24, 2002
1,459
4
Queens, NY
www.iloveny.com
Status (Visible)
You will be happy to know that women have been integrated into the Navy for a while now-- There are women aboard all the ships these days, even in combat roles like FA-18 jet jockeys.

Of course, while aboard ship you have to be content to just look and not touch. :D
 

PERFECT3435

Full Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Oct 22, 2003
1,416
0
45
Indianapolis
Status (Visible)
  1. Dentist
KDBUFF,

would you mind giving us a little detail on how one goes about getting into this program?

i have been thinking about doing it myself as 200 000 dollar to payoff your school is a lot of money. so far, i know that for every year of dental school's $$ you recieve from the army, you have to put in that many years into active duty.

but then what about the reserve years? let say i ask for $$ for 4 yrs. that means i will have to be on active duty for 4 yrs. how many yrs of reserve time would i have?



thank you
 

KDBuff

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Jan 16, 2002
142
0
SF
Status (Visible)
Perfect,

Al of the contracts are for eight years total, meaning you would serve four years active, then four in reserves. However, it's not as bad as it seems, as you are inactive reserves (no going to training once a month, no pay, no nothing), except your name sitting in a database. The way I see it, in the event of WWIII, you may be called upon to serve, but besides that you do nothing after your four years.

I believe the Navy is already finished selecting for this year, but if you hurry you could get your application in for the Army, as they have a few more boards left. If you want the four year scholarship, I would get on it in a hurry. Just find a local recruiter, and they can locate the health care recruiter in your area, or maybe you can find one through IUSD.

Anyhow, I'm having a bit of a panic attack tonight trying to make a decision on all of this. Let me say that my talk for the past two hours with my girlfriend didn't make my decision any easier. Which scares me more, not having control of where I'll be in three years, or $230,000 in debt??? I guess no sleep tonight.
 

jmill0

Licensed to Drill
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Sep 1, 2003
104
1
47
Tennessee
www.tanyardspringsfamilydentistry.com
Status (Visible)
  1. Dentist
PERFECT-
There is not the same scholarship available for just the reserves. I belive they have a $50K scholarship available (last time checked a few years ago), but it's $50K TOTAL earned towards your loans over three years. It is still an 8 year contract (for ALL dental officers). The good news is that your IRR (Inactive Ready Reserve) time counts while you are in school. I served 3 1/2 IRR in school, 3 years Active Duty and am finishing up my last 1 1/2 years of IRR right now. After that I can resign my commission and sever all ties from the military if I choose.

Point is.... don't look at the reserves to totally finance your education. BTW, you could get called up and still receive no more than the $50K.

JMHO.

Jason Miller, D.M.D.
CPT, DC, USAR
 
About the Ads

hi-speed513

Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 16, 2003
50
0
Status (Visible)
to anyone who is considering or has done these military scholarships: would you still consider them/have done them if you were a woman? I have thoroughly researched these scholarships and I am thinking of applying for either the army or navy maybe next year since I know the deadline has already passed for this year...I mean, I am a really versatile person, I adapt well to new situations and am totally comfortable around guys but I don't know if it would be weird as a woman dentist being on a ship for months that is like 90+% men...any input/advice would be much appreciated:)
 

Calculus1

G.V. Black Fan
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Feb 26, 2004
301
0
Dallas, TX
Status (Visible)
Highspeed, it depends on what you want. I've talked to several women about it and they had only good things to say(ARMY, though not NAVY). The only thing that I will say in my situation even as a guy,(I'm going Army) is that if I meet someone in D School she's really gonna have to love me because I'm contractually obligated to be somewhere for four years.
 

PERFECT3435

Full Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Oct 22, 2003
1,416
0
45
Indianapolis
Status (Visible)
  1. Dentist
calculus,

yes you will be somewhere for 4 years, but isn't it true that they give you some choices of where you would like to be stationed?
 

Calculus1

G.V. Black Fan
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Feb 26, 2004
301
0
Dallas, TX
Status (Visible)
Originally posted by PERFECT3435
calculus,

yes you will be somewhere for 4 years, but isn't it true that they give you some choices of where you would like to be stationed?

Yep, perfect, you get your choice of three places, and there are many different options. However, the Army can still send you where they want. My recruiter and a couple of former HPSPers told me that, usually, when someone doesn't get the post that they wanted it's because they waited too long to submit their choices. Apparently, the earlybird gets the worm.
 

koobpheej

Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Sep 14, 2003
140
0
Boston, MA
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
one thing about the navy is that there are many more positions on land bases compared to ships. if you are assigned to a ship, you are assigned to a ship, whether it is deployed to combat or something else. basically if you are worried about being on a boat, your chances are highest right out of dental school, or if you remain in the navy for a while without ever being on a boat. i have looked at biographies of some of the higher ranking dental officers in the navy, and it seemed that most of them had only been assigned to a boat once in their 15+ year career. Plus, if you volunteer for assignments overseas, with marine corps or on a boat, your usually granted your first choice on your next assignment.
I think if you plan was to get in and get out as soon as possible, it would be realistic to try and never be assigned to a ship. The military is also a great place for an adventure (on ships, overseas bases, etc.), made much easier if you don't have a family. But, I would agree with earlier posts, don't do it for the finances, it all pretty much evens out in the end.
 

PERFECT3435

Full Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Oct 22, 2003
1,416
0
45
Indianapolis
Status (Visible)
  1. Dentist
thank you all for answering my questions.

i set up an appointment for tomorrow with a recruiter from the ARMY. she told me that i might be late for this yr so we'll see what happens.
 

hi-speed513

Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Dec 16, 2003
50
0
Status (Visible)
Originally posted by koobpheej
one thing about the navy is that there are many more positions on land bases compared to ships. if you are assigned to a ship, you are assigned to a ship, whether it is deployed to combat or something else. basically if you are worried about being on a boat, your chances are highest right out of dental school, or if you remain in the navy for a while without ever being on a boat. i have looked at biographies of some of the higher ranking dental officers in the navy, and it seemed that most of them had only been assigned to a boat once in their 15+ year career. Plus, if you volunteer for assignments overseas, with marine corps or on a boat, your usually granted your first choice on your next assignment.
I think if you plan was to get in and get out as soon as possible, it would be realistic to try and never be assigned to a ship. The military is also a great place for an adventure (on ships, overseas bases, etc.), made much easier if you don't have a family. But, I would agree with earlier posts, don't do it for the finances, it all pretty much evens out in the end.

do you know how long these assignments are? for instance, if someone were assigned to a boat would it be for years on end or just for a specific time period? thanks
 

koobpheej

Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Sep 14, 2003
140
0
Boston, MA
Status (Visible)
  1. Resident [Any Field]
i think you can be assigned to a ship much longer than six months. In fact, I presently work with somebody that was in the Navy until just a few years ago. He was on the same ship the entire time he was in, which was about four to six years, don't remember exactly. On a boat, you can be away from the home port for about six months at a time. During that time you are either traveling from one place to another (under way), or doing some training, or some mission some where.
As a dentist, I don't know if things are different in the amount of time you are assigned to a ship. My friend was enlisted not an officer. An important thing to always remember before signing up to be a dentist in any branch of the military, is that you will be a dentist second and a soldier, sailor, etc first. That doesn't necessarily mean its hell. I seriously considered doing military scholarship, I just never felt like it was right for me. Even though I would love the chance to serve my country, I just knew in my gut that it was not for me. It can be a great thing if it is what is right for you.
 

UBTom

Class '04 official geezer
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Jul 24, 2002
1,459
4
Queens, NY
www.iloveny.com
Status (Visible)
The Navy's deployment cycle during normal times for those assigned to the surface fleet is usually 6 months ashore while a ship is being overhauled/maintained, then 6 months workup (training), then 6 months deployment (the cruise). But nowadays with the increased op-tempos due to the war on terrorism, the deployment cycle is extended especially during the cruise. The USS Abraham Lincoln carrier battle group was on station in the Indian Ocean for 10 months (!) during the war against the Taliban in 2002.

The submarine service is a bit different, with two crews for each "boat" that alternate between 3-month cruises.. I don't think they deploy dentists aboard submarines though. :D

For Navy officers it's usually two tours (two deployment cycles) with the fleet before they rotate to one tour of shore duty during which they can go and earn a masters or doctorate before getting a promotion and rotating back into the fleet for a billet of greater responsibilities.. Might be different for dental corps officers though.
 
About the Ads
This thread is more than 17 years old.

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.