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psychmom1

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Hello all! I am applying for a research program and I was wondering what would be the appropriate way to ask for a LOR? Should I email the professors and explain what I am doing and what I need or should I ask them personally? Also, any suggestions on how to ask them?
 

Green Pirate

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I would personally talk to them in person. It's easier to connect better that way. Perhaps talk to them during their office hours... it will make it easier to talk about the program, they can ask questions and get a better idea about what you're getting into, and hopefully this will help them right a better recommendation.
 

enviromed21

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I would personally talk to them in person. It's easier to connect better that way. Perhaps talk to them during their office hours... it will make it easier to talk about the program, they can ask questions and get a better idea about what you're getting into, and hopefully this will help them right a better recommendation.

I completely agree. I usually send an e-mail asking if we can set aside a time during their office hours for me to come by and chat ( so that I don't catch them in an unexpected bad mood by just popping in on them). I've found that making an appointment allows the LOR writers to focus on our conversation about the recommendation letter and it isn't rushed, so the discussion usually flows better. Hope this helps. Good luck:)
 
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Auron

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I completely agree. I usually send an e-mail asking if we can set aside a time during their office hours for me to come by and chat ( so that I don't catch them in an unexpected bad mood by just popping in on them). I've found that making an appointment allows the LOR writers to focus on our conversation about the recommendation letter and it isn't rushed, so the discussion usually flows better. Hope this helps. Good luck:)

yeah I plan on sending e-mail too, that way they can also prepare to meet you. Luckily the prof I'm going to ask knows EXACTLY why I want to do medicine, and supports my efforts 100%, yeah he told me if I ever needed anything to just ask, and that he was glad to "just know me":)
 

gary5

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Definitely ask them in person. While you were taking your courses, you were supposed to occasionally visit these professors to build a relationship. If you did, now they know you and it is easy to ask for an LOR. Anyway, no matter what you did so far, go in person and ask them. If they hesitate or make excuses, move on, because they will write weak letters. If they accept, then ask them what you can do to help. You can offer to give them a copy or your transcript and/or CV.
 

enviromed21

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yeah I plan on sending e-mail too, that way they can also prepare to meet you. Luckily the prof I'm going to ask knows EXACTLY why I want to do medicine, and supports my efforts 100%, yeah he told me if I ever needed anything to just ask, and that he was glad to "just know me":)

Love the avatar, Auron :thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:
 

psychmom1

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Thanks everyone. I have a relationship with a few so I will definitely make an appointment to see them. Also, please excuse me If I'm about to make an a$$ out of myself, but what does cv mean?
 

chad5871

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curriculum vitae - just your resume. wish you the best of luck :thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::)

Not quite. A CV and a resume are actually quite different. A resume should just be a short (usually 1-page) summary of your past work experience, contact information, educational background, and professional affiliations. A curriculum vitae, on the other hand, is an extensive, complete list of all of your accomplishments. At this point in your life your CV and resume will probably be quite similar, but later in your life, your CV should include (in addition to what is on the resume) your training, poster presentations, conferences attended, research conducted, etc.

The resume is like a professional summary while the CV is essentially a comprehensive professional autobiography.
 

Auron

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Not quite. A CV and a resume are actually quite different. A resume should just be a short (usually 1-page) summary of your past work experience, contact information, educational background, and professional affiliations. A curriculum vitae, on the other hand, is an extensive, complete list of all of your accomplishments. At this point in your life your CV and resume will probably be quite similar, but later in your life, your CV should include (in addition to what is on the resume) your training, poster presentations, conferences attended, research conducted, etc.

The resume is like a professional summary while the CV is essentially a comprehensive professional autobiography.

Correct, a cv is very extensive. My dads cv is 40 pages, I kid you not.
I'm updating mine right now, but searching for dates that I did stuff on makes me want to...+pissed+
 

cerulean

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I'd like suggestions on what to do: I sent out e-mails to two profs asking them if they would be willing to write me recommendation letters and explained why I valued taking their courses and then ended the e-mails saying that I would be willing to provide them with a copy of my resume and to meet with them. Two weeks later, I haven't heard from either of them, not even a quick 'I don't have the time to do this, sorry' e-mail. Would it be worth it to try to find out when their office hours are and ask them again in person? Perhaps my e-mails just got lost in their inboxes. Or should I just move on to other potential people?

The thing is, I took their classes a year ago (winter semester of 2006) and mostly interacted with the graduate student instructors of my lab sections. One instructor voluntarily mentioned that she would be willing to write me a rec letter...though she's at a different university now so it might be harder to get one from her. The instructor of the other course has mentioned that I was one of the top students of that class. Should I go talk to the profs in person to see if they'd be willing to write LORs or do you think their lack of response to my e-mails would indicate that I should move on to other people. Or, would it be alright to get LORs from the graduate student instructors?
Thanks.
 

boodthedog

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this is all useful information. Does anyone have any suggestions on how long before one needs the lor to ask. For instance, if I plan on submitting apps as early as possible in June, should I ask last week?
 

gary5

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I'd like suggestions on what to do: I sent out e-mails to two profs asking them if they would be willing to write me recommendation letters and explained why I valued taking their courses and then ended the e-mails saying that I would be willing to provide them with a copy of my resume and to meet with them. Two weeks later, I haven't heard from either of them, not even a quick 'I don't have the time to do this, sorry' e-mail. Would it be worth it to try to find out when their office hours are and ask them again in person? Perhaps my e-mails just got lost in their inboxes. Or should I just move on to other potential people?

The thing is, I took their classes a year ago (winter semester of 2006) and mostly interacted with the graduate student instructors of my lab sections. One instructor voluntarily mentioned that she would be willing to write me a rec letter...though she's at a different university now so it might be harder to get one from her. The instructor of the other course has mentioned that I was one of the top students of that class. Should I go talk to the profs in person to see if they'd be willing to write LORs or do you think their lack of response to my e-mails would indicate that I should move on to other people. Or, would it be alright to get LORs from the graduate student instructors?
Thanks.

Visit them in person and ask. If they recognize your face, they're more likely to agree to do it.
 

gary5

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this is all useful information. Does anyone have any suggestions on how long before one needs the lor to ask. For instance, if I plan on submitting apps as early as possible in June, should I ask last week?

I'd ask a month or two in advance. People are busy and you want to give them the flexibility to find time in their schedule.
 

Cirrus83

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Hello all! I am applying for a research program and I was wondering what would be the appropriate way to ask for a LOR? Should I email the professors and explain what I am doing and what I need or should I ask them personally? Also, any suggestions on how to ask them?

Threats usually work best. You have to be subtle though, or they might call the cops, but if you can get the message across that physical harm will come to them unless they do what you want, they'll usually agree. It's really an art form if you think about it, being able to threaten physical violence without saying it.

Sometimes I like to just walk in and break something of theirs with a baseball bat. That way I haven't actually threatened anybody, but it gets the message across. If you don't have a baseball bat, try looking for a brick or a cinder block around the neighborhood. If you can't find one, steal one from Home Depot or Lowes.

LCD monitors (and even the older CRT type) break pretty easily once you throw a cinder block at them. Just be careful not to have it fall on your toes, it'll really weaken your threat if you're hopping around in pain. Wear steel toed boots if you're not good at dodging falling cinder blocks.

Other than that, I dunno what other tips I can give you. Maybe you should practice a good sneer too?
 
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