• Advice You're Thankful for Contest

    Now that it's getting close to Thanksgiving, we're running a contest to hear advice you've received that you're most thankful for! This can be any type of advice and the advice with the most reactions will win!

    JOIN CONTEST

Aspirations

nathdep

New Member
Dec 29, 2015
2
0
  1. Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
    Hello everyone!

    I am currently a junior in undergrad (Hartwick College). I'm majoring in Spanish and French currently and I have a minor in piano.

    I have a few questions about going into the field of psychiatry. To start off, I want to say that I really love helping people and seeing them improve. Medication has always interested me and I've seen its positive impacts on those close to me. I am also very interested in studying the mechanisms behind medication.

    Currently, I don't have any credits in science other than what is required for general education credits. What would I have to do after graduating to put myself on the track to becoming a psychiatrist?

    As with everything academia related, I do worry about the cost of schooling. Currently, I am receiving aid from FAFSA and that's what I'm using to survive. My family is very poor and I know my mom wouldn't be able to support me through med school. I could take out loans but what is the likelihood that I would be able to pay them back assuming I succeeded in becoming a psychiatrist?

    I know I will have to do a Post-Bacc program. How expensive would one be?

    Thanks so much for your help!
     

    Ismet

    Full Member
    Moderator Emeritus
    7+ Year Member
    May 15, 2011
    9,909
    10,029
    1. Attending Physician
      You become a psychiatrist by getting through medical school and then getting into a psychiatry residency program. There's really nothing you need to do before medical school to help you into a psychiatry residency. Focus on getting into medical school, do some psych research if you are so inclined, and then move toward the next step.

      You need gen chem 1 & 2, organic chem 1&2, biology 1&2, biochemistry, math (requirements vary by school), psychology and/or sociology - all are either pre-requirements and/or recommended for the MCAT.

      AAMC has a database of post-bacc programs where you can get a lot of information. https://apps.aamc.org/postbac/
       
      • Like
      Reactions: 4 users
      About the Ads

      thatwouldbeanarchy

      Full Member
      5+ Year Member
      Nov 6, 2014
      976
      1,192
      1. Medical Student
        ^ You also need Physics 1 & 2.

        If you're sure that you're interested in medicine, I wouldn't stress out too much about finances. Pretty much everyone takes out some amount of loans for medical school. In addition, you may receive some financial aid, depending on your financial situation and the school you end up getting into. The prognosis for paying off debt once you become a doctor is pretty good, although it may take many years and require some frugal living, especially during residency.

        I can't speak to the specific cost of formal post-bacc programs but I would recommend looking into DIY post-bacc programs, too, for comparison. I think they may end up being cheaper. If you went this route, you would simply enroll as a non-degree student at a university of your choice. If you chose your state school, you could take advantage of in-state tuition and then just take the classes you need for med school.
         
        • Like
        Reactions: 1 user

        nathdep

        New Member
        Dec 29, 2015
        2
        0
        1. Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
          Here are the courses I've already taken or have gotten through AP credit (they've also counted toward general education at my college) or have taken in college already:

          Single Variable Calculus
          AP Physics C: Mechanics (w/ lab)
          AP Chemistry (w/ lab)
          Environmental Geology

          There is a community college that would offer most if not all of these courses near me (it's a lot more affordable too). Would that count for pre-requisites for med school? I could also fit an organic chemistry course in and maybe something else during my last year at college.

          My GPA is also around 3.5 (or will be when I graduate). Should I be worried about this preventing me from getting accepted? There were some music courses with horrible professors that lowered my GPA not to mention that the music department was in the process of falling apart.

          Would coming in as a French and Spanish major hurt my chances as well since they aren't science based?
           

          thatwouldbeanarchy

          Full Member
          5+ Year Member
          Nov 6, 2014
          976
          1,192
          1. Medical Student
            If you can, I would definitely start some of your prereqs now while you're in school to save you having to pay to take them after graduation. But obviously, you won't be able to fit them all in before graduation and that's okay. Taking your prereqs at CC after your graduate is probably fine. A 3.5 GPA is just slightly below the average for students accepted to MD programs, which is about 3.7. I wouldn't sweat this as long as your GPA doesn't drop once you start taking science courses. You have an opportunity to bring it up, if you do well in your prereqs. And once you've done that, you'll want to give yourself plenty of time for focused, diligent MCAT prep.

            Med schools don't care at all what your major is so you're good in that respect. Just make sure to get some clinical experience. You can do this in many different ways by volunteering at a hospital, doctor's office, hospice, clinic, etc. and by shadowing doctors.
             

            Turkishking

            Full Member
            5+ Year Member
            Jul 15, 2015
            2,446
            1,215
            1. Pre-Medical
              ^ You also need Physics 1 & 2.

              If you're sure that you're interested in medicine, I wouldn't stress out too much about finances. Pretty much everyone takes out some amount of loans for medical school. In addition, you may receive some financial aid, depending on your financial situation and the school you end up getting into. The prognosis for paying off debt once you become a doctor is pretty good, although it may take many years and require some frugal living, especially during residency.

              I can't speak to the specific cost of formal post-bacc programs but I would recommend looking into DIY post-bacc programs, too, for comparison. I think they may end up being cheaper. If you went this route, you would simply enroll as a non-degree student at a university of your choice. If you chose your state school, you could take advantage of in-state tuition and then just take the classes you need for med school.

              Don't you need inorganic I and II? or can I just take organic I and II?
               

              WedgeDawg

              not actually a dog
              Moderator Emeritus
              7+ Year Member
              Mar 22, 2012
              7,690
              12,975
              1. Resident [Any Field]
                Don't you need inorganic I and II? or can I just take organic I and II?

                You need general chemistry I&II and either organic chemistry I&II, organic chemistry I + biochem, or organic chemistry I&II + biochem depending on the school.

                At some schools, inorganic chemistry and general chemistry are different courses. The introductory version is generally the one you're looking for (which is usually labeled "general").
                 
                • Like
                Reactions: 1 user
                About the Ads
                This thread is more than 5 years old.

                Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

                1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
                2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
                3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
                4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
                5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
                6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
                7. This thread is locked.