TheBlaah

7+ Year Member
Apr 10, 2010
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Pharmacist
I recently accepted a job offer with a hospital and have just recently finished orientation. However, I do not actually start for a few more days.

Surprisingly, I just received an offer from another hospital that I honestly didn't think I would get. It has a better location, my preferential shift (10 hr evening), better retirement, but lower pay.

I was hoping to get some opinions and maybe advice on how to handle the situation.
 

WVUPharm2007

imagine sisyphus happy
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Jun 23, 2003
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It's pretty simple. After you sign the offer letter, tell the director as soon as possible that you are going to be accepting another position.
 
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Lnsean

10+ Year Member
May 26, 2009
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I recently accepted a job offer with a hospital and have just recently finished orientation. However, I do not actually start for a few more days.

Surprisingly, I just received an offer from another hospital that I honestly didn't think I would get. It has a better location, my preferential shift (10 hr evening), better retirement, but lower pay.

I was hoping to get some opinions and maybe advice on how to handle the situation.
Highly unprofessional...but in today's world...employers are not loyal to you...so as a pharmacist to another pharmacist...I say go for it. Just know that obviously you'll be burning that bridge.
 

BidingMyTime

Lost Shaker Of Salt
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Oct 2, 2006
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Well, if you have been through the orientation, you were presumably paid for that and are an employee. So even though you technically haven't started working yet, you should give 2 - 4 weeks notice, whatever the employee guide asks for in your position. Most likely you will be told that is not necessary (since there is no point in them training you for 2 weeks), and your employment will be terminated at that point. You may not be out and out put on their "do not rehire" list (but you could be), but know there will definitely be a note in your personal file that makes it unlikely you would be rehired by them in the future. Which is a risk, because in the future you may want to work for them. Still, the future is unknown, if you are certain the new job offer is better for you, I'd go for it now.
 

awval999

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Oct 30, 2005
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As others have said...

It's your life. You owe them nothing. They would do the same to you if they had to to make budget, etc.

But remember, if this is a large health system or whatever, you may be blacklisted. If the other place is truly your dream job, then I would go.
 

kwakster928

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Backing out on an already accepted offer is highly unprofessional. You should have contacted the other hospital for offer when you had a competing offer in your hand. If you decide to leave, you must give them a proper notice. However, you will find or already know that pharmacy is a small world. Stuff like that will follow you if you are not careful.
 
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rph3664

7+ Year Member
Jul 5, 2010
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Backing out on an already accepted offer is highly unprofessional. You should have contacted the other hospital for offer when you had a competing offer in your hand. If you decide to leave, you must give them a proper notice. However, you will find or already know that pharmacy is a small world. Stuff like that will follow you if you are not careful.
To the OP: Unless there are big fat red flags regarding the job you have now that you didn't recognize beforehand, you should stay there. If you hadn't started the job (and yes, doing orientation counts as "starting a job") I'd say take the new offer, but you're already there.
 
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npage148

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May 2, 2005
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Highly unprofessional is ghosting on you're new job. Giving notice is just going to make some people grumpy. Also, pharmacy is not that small of a world. That's what bosses and schools tell naive people to make them fall into line.

If you really like the new job then take it. The hosp you're at now is owed nothing and the will have no loyalty to you. Your may gain loyalty from your direct suprivpsor but never from the company. You're just a number on a personal file so why stick it out when something better presents itself
 
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BMBiology

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15+ Year Member
Feb 26, 2003
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Take the new offer. Tell them you are going to donate the money you made from orientation to save the sea turtle foundation (then secretly keep the money and buy yourself a snake skinned wallet or purse or both).


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile app
 
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BenJammin

No Apologies
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Jun 29, 2011
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Tell your old employer that you've accepted a new position at a different company and you appreciate the offer but today is your last day. Don't give a two week notice, you'll be laughed at.
 

kwakster928

A Legal Drug Dealer
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Highly unprofessional is ghosting on you're new job. Giving notice is just going to make some people grumpy. Also, pharmacy is not that small of a world. That's what bosses and schools tell naive people to make them fall into line.

If you really like the new job then take it. The hosp you're at now is owed nothing and the will have no loyalty to you. Your may gain loyalty from your direct suprivpsor but never from the company. You're just a number on a personal file so why stick it out when something better presents itself
I disagree. I am not certain of what conspired the OP's decision but there were plenty of avenues for OP to avoid this situation from ever taking place. As I stated before, if you had one offer from a hospital, you could have leverage that to get a decision from the hospital the OP wants to go. Maybe the OP tried all this but it was a result of unfortunate timing. I don't know.

What I do know is that when I accept an offer or say something, I stand behind it. If I committed to do something, I do it 100%. If a situation arise that I cannot fulfill that commitment, I fess up and exit as professionally as possible. Yes. Working there knowing that you will leave is also unprofessional.

About the pharmacy being a small world. I am not sure what's the proximity of two hospitals that the OP applied at. If you don't think that the pharmacy directors or the managements are not talking or networking each other, you are delusional. If you spit on someone, you will eventually get spit on.

At the end, do what's best for you. It is your life. But if you decide to take the other job, exit gracefully (whatever that means.)
 

CUpharmD2013

7+ Year Member
Mar 20, 2010
301
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Pharmacist
We don't know how long the "orientation" period was. I was in a very similar situation recently. Accepted position at one hospital 1 hour and 15 minutes from my home. Position opened up at small hospital 15 minutes from home (which I never would have expected), 3 months after starting at other hospital and pretty much at the end of my "orientation" period. I met with my supervisor, explained to her why I was leaving, she understood, and I offered to stay on for the standard 2 weeks. They were glad to have me for that 2 weeks since they would have to hire someone else in the meantime. I also offered to stay on contingent to help them out in any way that I could. If you're open and honest with the place that you are leaving, it should be a professional separation.
 
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