Dismiss Notice

Interview Feedback: Visit Interview Feedback to view and submit interview information.

Interviewing Masterclass: Free masterclass on interviewing from SDN and Medical College of Georgia

Basic science vs. clinical years

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Benjo, Apr 28, 2004.

  1. Benjo

    Benjo Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2003
    Messages:
    249
    Likes Received:
    0
    Everybody seems to say that the basic science years matter very little in residency placement (aside from Step 1 scores, of course), but isn't it logical to deduce a correlation between performance during the basic science years and clinical rotations? Part of this is surely because the students that bust their asses in the first two years will, by continuation, do so in the third and fourth years, but there also must be some relation between degree of knowledge garnered from high performance in basic science and success in rotations, right? Just a thought. Interested to know what others think.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  2. W222

    W222 2K Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2003
    Messages:
    4,244
    Likes Received:
    1
    Those people who say that it matters very little are looking to far ahead, would you say? You must learn to crawl before you can walk.
     
  3. DrJ2B

    DrJ2B Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2003
    Messages:
    760
    Likes Received:
    0

    I think it can be argued that that may not be the case. Many people who do well in basic sciences are perhaps more geared to book knowledge. It is a whole other ballgame when you are dealing with real people. Social interaction is just as important and being able to treat someone. Also, some people cannot readily apply what was learned in basic science to clinical rotations. Although, some people who work hard at the basic sciences and do well can certainly be great at clinical rotations. I just do not think it is a given.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  4. rxfudd

    rxfudd 1K Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2001
    Messages:
    1,343
    Likes Received:
    4
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Although there is some overlap b/w basic science and clinical years, people often do better in one over the other. Some people just cannot remember all of these stupid little details that have absolutely no bearing on patient care, treatment, or diagnosis. Others can do that easily, but have a hard time presenting to attendings or are uncomfortable /awkward doing a full H/P or dealing with certain types of patients (elderly, cancer, etc). Different people will shine in different things, and they are not necessarily related. Remember, patients never present with "Hi, I'm a 48 yo white female with a history of hypertension and diabetes presenting with crushing substernal chest pain, diaphoresis, and shortness of breath for the past 4 hours." Depending on the case, it can be really tough to put it all together and certain people can do this much better than others. Much different than exams, which kind of guide you towards the right answer (if you're taking a path exam on skin and GI, you know you'll be seeing path questions regarding skin and GI).

    Also remember that in med school, you will not use about 30-40% of the information you actually learn - literally, gone as soon as you start year 3. Much of it is just not clinically relevent and no one really cares if you know it or not. Residency programs generally could care less if you know the biochemical pathways of gluconeogenesis or the target gene of follicular lymphoma. Conversely, you had better know what drugs are indicated (and contraindicated) for your patient's symptoms/disease as well as the top three most common and/or most deadly diagnoses for their signs and symptoms. And you had better show that you know everything about your patient's presentation (labs, images, history, overnight changes, etc) and be able to do one hell of a workup. Think about it - if you're a hospital, do you want someone who knows obscure facts or has shown that he/she can handle the actual practice of medicine?
     
  5. Benjo

    Benjo Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2003
    Messages:
    249
    Likes Received:
    0
    DrJ2B,
    I understand what you are saying, but your patients are not grading you during rotations--depending on the school, it is some sort of mixture of residents/attendings. So, I would contend that demonstrable application of book , as well as ability to demonstrate knowledge of procedures, etc. is more important than personality. Although, a team that likes you will be more likely to give you a higher grade. Who knows--but, I would be interested to see if basic science performance correlates with grades during clinical years.
    On an unrelated note, did anybody know that the VR section of the MCAT demonstrated the strongest correlation to Step 1 scores out of all the MCAT sections?
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...

Share This Page