OpalOnyx

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Aug 15, 2008
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"Well rounded" seems to be a term used on the pre-med forum a lot. People making sure they're "well rounded" as they apply to medical school.

But sometimes I feel like I'm not as "well rounded" as I WANT to be because of being pre-med, having invested all that time with school school school. Which I'm thankful for. But with more years of studying ahead, I just want to experience more of life ya know?

Anybody else felt this way? And how to do you deal with it or try to feel more complete/whole/well rounded?

I've had a lot of trouble coming to terms with medical school and the time... just my life being completely engulfed. And especially feeling it now that second year is beginning with boards and all.
 

xanthomondo

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"Well rounded" seems to be a term used on the pre-med forum a lot. People making sure they're "well rounded" as they apply to medical school.

But sometimes I feel like I'm not as "well rounded" as I WANT to be because of being pre-med, having invested all that time with school school school. Which I'm thankful for. But with more years of studying ahead, I just want to experience more of life ya know?

Anybody else felt this way? And how to do you deal with it or try to feel more complete/whole/well rounded?

I've had a lot of trouble coming to terms with medical school and the time... just my life being completely engulfed. And especially feeling it now that second year is beginning with boards and all.
I became much more well-rounded during med school.....stupid 25 lbs :(


But seriously I felt the same way as you. I used my pre-med time to stay as far away from biology/medicine as I could because I knew I'd be doing that for the rest of my life.

What was the end result? I got rejected from medical school.
 
Dec 16, 2009
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I'm just about to start MS-II and I definitely feel that life can become pretty one-dimensional at times, with the focus being on medical school to the exclusion of other things. I go back and forth between embracing it and hating it - I feel lucky to have this path and subject matter I truly find interesting.

For me, what has helped is forcing myself to explore outside interests and hobbies with the same dedication as classes (although spending much less time on them) - tried out sailing, rock climbing, running, cooking, and other stuff and found some interests. Still trying to find out what I enjoy and who I want to be - but that's part of this time in life.

Biggest adjustment for me has been going from a kid who didn't care about anything drinking and hanging out to having a serious goal I'm working towards - I'm struggling to not feel uneducated and foolish.
 
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For top specialties, medical school is a huge competition for residency spots. There will always be a tendency towards imbalance to remain competitive.
 

D elegans

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The "well-rounded" mantra is overplayed and overrated. The great irony to me is that since medical schools apparently value well-roundedness, then pre-meds will attempt to be the most well-rounded to be admitted. :smack:

Who cares if you're well-rounded? If what you want to do is spend every waking moment studying medicine, do it.
 
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May 27, 2011
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The "well-rounded" mantra is overplayed and overrated. The great irony to me is that since medical schools apparently value well-roundedness, then pre-meds will attempt to be the most well-rounded to be admitted. :smack:

Who cares if you're well-rounded? If what you want to do is spend every waking studying medicine, do it.
The profession rewards those individuals. AOA, higher Step scores, more knowledge yielding better evals in rotations, these outcomes are more likely alongside more time spent studying intelligently.
 

OpalOnyx

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The profession rewards those individuals. AOA, higher Step scores, more knowledge yielding better evals in rotations, these outcomes are more likely alongside more time spent studying intelligently.
To each their own. I would rather have those outcomes happen in the process of mastering the material rather than for their own sake. I just want to be happy I guess. Getting AOA or not frankly doesn't add that much to my happiness or self worth. But knowing my ***t (vs feeling clueless or not doing my best) definitely makes a heck of a difference. It's just that I question the amount of time I spend studying away, but I just have to get over my ego and realize I have a job to do and that's for now to learn what's required of me. Or what I chose to require of me.
 

isoquin

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I find this topic interesting in relation to specialization. Back in the day, there were lots of generalists. Then there was a giant push to be super-subsubsubspecialized. In many areas, it's gotten to the point where docs are just cornering their capabilities, doing only one main thing over and over every day, and so there's been a more recent push for a more well rounded expertise.

My personal advice would be this: be you. Do what you like. It's better to get paid less and be happy during the 80+ hours that comprise your professional life.
 

2012mdc

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The profession rewards those individuals. AOA, higher Step scores, more knowledge yielding better evals in rotations, these outcomes are more likely alongside more time spent studying intelligently.
Study efficiently and you can be well rounded and do well. You don't have to be a studying machine to succeed in medical school
 

D elegans

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My personal advice would be this: be you. Do what you like. It's better to get paid less and be happy during the 80+ hours that comprise your professional life.
:thumbup: And people who love doing nothing else other than medicine shouldn't be made to feel bad because of their lack of "roundedness."
 
Jul 3, 2011
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In my opinion, a lot of the time this well-roundedness is nothing more than a cardboard front put on to get past admission process in med school. Doing something for the sake of ticking a box on a form is not well roundedness.

I agree with previous orators, you should do what you like doing because otherwise you will be miserable. Medical career is counted in decades, not simply years. So if you are not 100% happy with your lifestyle, be it medicine only or 1001 things alongside, you are heading for trouble.
 

adaptation1

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May 29, 2010
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Agree with above. if i play sports, play 2 instruments, paint, engage in various interest groups and do well in med school, am I well-rounded?

maybe on paper, when i'm applying to med school, but not necessarily in real life. and in your inner life, you are the only person you have to answer to.

the point is being content with your life, avoiding unnecessary stress, and doing what you need to do to make med school work for you. for some that may be studying all day. i ain't mad at them. for others, it may be a partying and getting drunk every other day. you aren't a nerd for studying all day. nor are you party animal for getting drunk all day. putting people and yourself in a box of "well-roundedness" or "unroundeness" is efficient for interviews and applications, but degrading to everday existence and individuality,
 

isoquin

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:thumbup: And people who love doing nothing else other than medicine shouldn't be made to feel bad because of their lack of "roundedness."
except for gunners. gotta hate on the gunners :p
 
Aug 2, 2011
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The key is to do what is neccessary for success and then add what you enjoy. Some are overloaded and unsucessful by striving to be well rounded.

Focus on the important and then eliminate the rest.
 

OpalOnyx

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I became much more well-rounded during med school.....stupid 25 lbs :(


But seriously I felt the same way as you. I used my pre-med time to stay as far away from biology/medicine as I could because I knew I'd be doing that for the rest of my life.

What was the end result? I got rejected from medical school.
I'm getting "well rounded" too... hehe. Food is yummy
 

OpalOnyx

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Aug 15, 2008
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The key is to do what is neccessary for success and then add what you enjoy. Some are overloaded and unsucessful by striving to be well rounded.

Focus on the important and then eliminate the rest.
I like this :thumbup:
 
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