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Best order to take upper bio classes

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by AWhitehair, Dec 14, 2005.

  1. AWhitehair

    AWhitehair EM PA-C. MD wannabe
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    Hey guys-

    I was putting together my next few semesters before graduation and I thought I would ask for some advice. I have four upper bio courses to take before I graduate... biochem, immunology, histology, and physiology. I know that any of these courses can be taken first, but what order would be the best order to take them in if I am trying to build on previous knowledge? For example, would knowledge in biochem help me better in immunology or would knowledge in immunology help me better in biochem? Keep in mind that I will have already taken the MCAT so, it should not affect the order. Also, this is being done over two semesters and a summer, so some of them will be taken together. Which ones would be best to take together? Sorry for the long post, just trying to make my point clear.

    AWhitehair
     
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  3. TX515

    TX515 Senior Member
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    Immunology is about the immune system, and is pretty hardcore. Biochem is more biology, proteins, acid/base, enzymes, etc. The order you take them won't really matter, but I'd say don't take them at the same time to make it easier on yourself. You might consider taking biochem with histology, then take immunology with physiology. Biochem should help you with physiology, and visa versa.
     
  4. So long as you've taken any required prerequisites for any given class, it does not matter what order you take them. The 4 classes you list don't build on each other in any way significant enough to justify a certain order -- biochem is not needed for physiology in my opinion.

    Take them in the order they are offered, or however they best fit into your schedule.
     
  5. 75969

    75969 Guest

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    My advice is the same as above!!!

    DONT take immunology with biochem.....DO take histology before physiology.
     
  6. AWhitehair

    AWhitehair EM PA-C. MD wannabe
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    Thanks for the advice. I guess my rough draft is out then, because I paired biochem and immunology in the same semester...yikes. No prob, just a little switch-a-roo.

    Thanks again,
    AWhitehair
     
  7. chandelantern

    chandelantern MSI at Mayo in August!
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    I think biochem and physiology are the basics and are good ones to take first (I don't think order matters here.) Then take immunology and histo together. I never took histo, but there was some basic immunology covered in my phys class, so I had a general grasp before going into immunology. I've never taken histo, but my guess would be physiology would be beneficial for that too.
     
  8. AWhitehair

    AWhitehair EM PA-C. MD wannabe
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    Okay, so how does this sound... Immunology in the summer, biochem and histo in the fall, and physio in the spring? Any switches?
     
  9. dajimmers

    dajimmers Hedgehog!
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    Sounds good to me!

    Understand, however, that we all have different experiences (if any) with these classes. Biochem at one school may be basic "amino acid alphabet" stuff, or hardcore analysis of the space between consecutive nucleotides at another. Same goes for the others. Talk to students at your school to see what the classes are like.
     

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