Trowell

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What states are the more psych friendly in terms of payment etc. I heard the South East is a good area to practice medicine as a whole due to less managed care problems etc.

Also I am still waiting on response to my thread on Sleep Fellowships.

Thanks
 

OldPsychDoc

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Trowell said:
What states are the more psych friendly in terms of payment etc. I heard the South East is a good area to practice medicine as a whole due to less managed care problems etc.

Also I am still waiting on response to my thread on Sleep Fellowships.

Thanks
The "best place to practice" is the place where you want to live and raise your family (if that fits in to your plans).

Managed care is a fact of life--if there are fewer "managed care problems" in the SE, it's probably because they're somewhat behind the curve--better to go somewhere where docs and hospitals have adapted to the modern marketplace instead of pointing fingers at "managed care" as the problem.

How did managed care become a "problem"? Because health care has to be paid for by _someone_--and since there is no political will for goverment to raise taxes and foot the cost (or institute a single-payer system), and since workers demand full coverage health insurance with full choice and access, and because we (doctors and nurses and pharmacists, etc..) don't work for free--the US has evolved a system which relies on administration of costs by a combination of government, private non-profit, and private for-profit organizations. You can't pay out to providers and hospitals more than is being brought in by premiums, fees, and other revenue. Someone has to define the limits somewhere.

Sleep fellowships...I don't think there's such a thing "officially"--but there are probably interdisciplinary (neuro, pulmonary, psych, IM) programs which give you extended clinical experience, or academic programs that make you into a sleep researcher. I don't know how "lucrative" it is. If that's your first concern, you might think about something else...
 

john182

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OldPsychDoc said:
How did managed care become a "problem"? Because health care has to be paid for by _someone_--and since there is no political will for goverment to raise taxes and foot the cost (or institute a single-payer system), and since workers demand full coverage health insurance with full choice and access, and because we (doctors and nurses and pharmacists, etc..) don't work for free--the US has evolved a system which relies on administration of costs by a combination of government, private non-profit, and private for-profit organizations. You can't pay out to providers and hospitals more than is being brought in by premiums, fees, and other revenue. Someone has to define the limits somewhere.
THat's a great answer!