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Best way to prepare for MCAT CARS?

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cuphea

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First I would like to say I have terrible reading comprehension skills. I have about 1 year to prepare myself for MCAT CARS. I have read a lot of tips/advice on improving in CARS, but they are geared towards improvement in a few months. For someone who has about a year to prepare what do you recommend? Do you recommend I ..

-read tons of ny times/ economist articles and ask my self questions

-read novel after novel,

-master the SAT reading section and practice from GRE prep books

Or do you have any other suggestions?
 

Govols22

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It's simply practice. Read passages and answer problems. As you practice, your reading comprehension will increase. Make sure to pay attention to the first and last sentences of every paragraph, and get an understanding of the argument that the author is making. Understanding the first paragraph is crucial in my opinion. 9/10 times the key sentence is pretty obvious in the first paragraph, and everything after that is support for their argument. When you are reading, highlight key words such as people, dates, and opinionated words and transition words and anything in quotations.

Highlighting transition words such as "however, but, etc", will give you a feel for their true opinions. A lot of the times they regurgitate an outside argument, and then use a transition word and create an argument to combat it, in favor of their true belief. People who tend to skim too quickly do not recognize this pivotal cue, and wrongly assumes that this is the others opinion. In time, you may not have to highlight these transition words, as it can take time, but it is great practice to be on the lookout for them.

I regularly highlight names and dates so when they ask about a person in the passage, I can quickly go to their highlighted name rather than skimming the passage. This is useful for passages where the author decides to mention everyone and their mother and when there are simply too many names to remember.

Also, anything in quotations is usually relevant, and is more common to be in a "what did the author mean by "X" word" kind of question.

As you practice, you will not only gain reading comprehension, you will also notice tendencies in the type of questions. Practice is everything when it comes to CARS.
 

Chromium Surfer

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It's simply practice. Read passages and answer problems. As you practice, your reading comprehension will increase. Make sure to pay attention to the first and last sentences of every paragraph, and get an understanding of the argument that the author is making. Understanding the first paragraph is crucial in my opinion. 9/10 times the key sentence is pretty obvious in the first paragraph, and everything after that is support for their argument. When you are reading, highlight key words such as people, dates, and opinionated words and transition words and anything in quotations.

Highlighting transition words such as "however, but, etc", will give you a feel for their true opinions. A lot of the times they regurgitate an outside argument, and then use a transition word and create an argument to combat it, in favor of their true belief. People who tend to skim too quickly do not recognize this pivotal cue, and wrongly assumes that this is the others opinion. In time, you may not have to highlight these transition words, as it can take time, but it is great practice to be on the lookout for them.

I regularly highlight names and dates so when they ask about a person in the passage, I can quickly go to their highlighted name rather than skimming the passage. This is useful for passages where the author decides to mention everyone and their mother and when there are simply too many names to remember.

Also, anything in quotations is usually relevant, and is more common to be in a "what did the author mean by "X" word" kind of question.

As you practice, you will not only gain reading comprehension, you will also notice tendencies in the type of questions. Practice is everything when it comes to CARS.
How are you scoring in CARS if you don't mind me asking?
 
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