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biomedical engineering

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gmcsierra

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what is biomedical engineering? what do they do? can they be employed in small communities? do they get to study calculus based physics, statics, dynamics..........?
 
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i minor in bioengineering so i can answer some questions. first yeah they do have to take all those courses, its really like chemical engineering, but more biology based.

they design medical instruments, like the artificial lion heart, they could work in a school(research), in a hospital (clinical research) or in a company(making instruments).

this answers ur questions? yes?
 

Gleevec

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Originally posted by gmcsierra
what is biomedical engineering? what do they do? can they be employed in small communities? do they get to study calculus based physics, statics, dynamics..........?

Yup. Biomedical engineers are predominantly (like 75%) engineers. They design electrical equipment used by hospitals and researches, they do some mechanical organ design, and they work on some aspects of organ/tuissue design. The bulk of their study is actually in physics, math, and electrical engineering. They can get employed in smaller communities., though the bigname companies are Siemens, GE, and some others that I forget. You can always work for a biotech company as well.

Biomedical Engineering and Computer Science has become popular because of the new computational methods used in biology.
 

beanbean

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I am a biomedical engineer and worked as a clinical engineer at a hospital. I was responsible for the installation, repair, training, and safety of all electrical equipment involved in patient care. In addition, my department designed specialized systems and interfaced and networked various equipment systems together. Fascinating work! I was able to observe all types of procedures throughout the hospital and was often called to troubleshoot problems during procedures.

My undergrad is in Biomedical Engineering from Boston University (1990). The coursework is similiar to electrical engineering; however, classes such as electronics and controls are focused on biomedical and physiological systems. Other classmates of mine went to work for biomedical companies which manufactured and designed a variety of devices. Some undergrad programs emphasize more materials and mechanical engineering than electrical engineering. This is useful if you are interested in areas such as implant or prosthetic design.

It is a very tough major at most universities because you have numerous engineering as well as biology requisites.

Best of luck!
 
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