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Blood glucose

soccrwz

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Oct 12, 2007
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This has been discussed before, but what to see what people are currently doing. How many people routinely getting FSG prior to procedures?

Myth #1: Epidural steroid injections do not affect blood glucose levels. Fact: Administration of epidural glucocorticoids results in temporary hyperglycemia. This usually does not result in any serious consequences. Although catastrophic complications might be imaginable, the literature is limited to a few case reports. Precautions can be taken to reduce risks.

 
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paindoc007

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This has been discussed before, but what to see what people are currently doing. How many people routinely getting FSG prior to procedures?

Myth #1: Epidural steroid injections do not affect blood glucose levels. Fact: Administration of epidural glucocorticoids results in temporary hyperglycemia. This usually does not result in any serious consequences. Although catastrophic complications might be imaginable, the literature is limited to a few case reports. Precautions can be taken to reduce risks.


I check it for anyone who is a diabetic
 
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Baron Samedi

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I use an A1C > 8 as a cutoff for stim trials/implants. I've never seen any actual published guidelines, but this study talks about complication rates for other surgeries based on A1C. As a fellow I occasionally did cases higher than that if the patient showed a downward trend and was highly reliable/motivated.


I have declined a few ESIs due to poorly controlled diabetes, but I kind of take those case by case. The last thing I want to do is put someone in a diabetic coma for temporary partial relief of chronic low back pain. I probably wouldn't do an ESI in someone >9(correlates with average BG of 212) unless they were in extremis, had strong social support, and already had a sliding scale.
 
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