Blue Top Tubes

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Beeftenderloin

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My hospital is critically short on blue top tubes. They’ve already put limits on coag orders for floor patients. For cardiac cases we routinely send coags/fibrinogen coming off pump. I know we’re not the only ones dealing with this issue. Anyone have any clever work arounds they’re using at their shop?

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Unfortunately to hear this, and I hate "I was syndrome" which means to compare things in different circumstances.
In Iraq, we have lots of shortages, we buy sometimes our own drugs, but if I were you, will buy a brand blue top tubes out of my pocket. They are 60 USD 2 pack of 100 tubes... See Amazon and presented as a gift to your lab!
 
We don’t check anything a majority of the times after a routine cardiac case. Just make sure the ABG and ACT looks good and that surgeons are doing their job. Same for our livers as well. We dont check coags or TEG unless surgeon thinks so after the new liver is in and seeing how things go. Also, the TEG we use just sends off in a plain 3cc syringe sending it off ASAP. But lately they also have been making us send it with the blue top. Not sure if it’s made much difference?
 
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Why? We just give products if the field looks bloody. Isn't that what matters in the end?
 
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If you want to get real podunk, You can buy sodium citrate off Amazon.

Interestingly, the same way citrate binds calcium to prevent blood from clotting, can be used in cooking to make a creamier fondue, by chelating the calcium in cheese and preventing it from ‘coagulating’.
 
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If you want to get real podunk, You can buy sodium citrate off Amazon.

Interestingly, the same way citrate binds calcium to prevent blood from clotting, can be used in cooking to make a creamier fondue, by chelating the calcium in cheese and preventing it from ‘coagulating’.
Answering the questions I didn’t even know I needed answers to. Thank you.
 
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For cardiac cases we routinely send coags/fibrinogen coming off pump. I know we’re not the only ones dealing with this issue. Anyone have any clever work arounds they’re using at their shop?
Don't send coags routinely? Just wondering if when the coags come back out of whack enough to treat, how often is that a surprise for a given patient?
 
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