Books on Military Medicine?

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schrizto

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Are there any books on military medicine that are a good read? I don't mean reference books, I mean more like a doctor's autobiography or memoir. If there aren't any, someone should write one! I'm also looking to get familiar with some of the terms used in military medicine.

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Are there any books on military medicine that are a good read? I don't mean reference books, I mean more like a doctor's autobiography or memoir. If there aren't any, someone should write one! I'm also looking to get familiar with some of the terms used in military medicine.

On Call in Hell
Rule Number 2
Doc: Heroic Stories of Medics, Corpsmen, and Surgeons in Combat
 
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Thanks for the book suggestions! I just picked them up from my local library.


On Call in Hell
Rule Number 2
Doc: Heroic Stories of Medics, Corpsmen, and Surgeons in Combat
 
Here are some blogs that you may find interesting. They're written by Navy docs in Afghanistan.

http://dochsia.blogspot.com/ (FP as an Individual Augmentee in Afghanistan, interesting how he was trained to use an M4, M9, M2, M240, and a Mk 19, clear houses, call in air support and do other Army tasks)

http://mountainsailor.blogspot.com/ (LCDR FP, as an Individual Augmentee in Afghanistan, again trained at Ft. Riley to do the above)

http://452days.blogspot.com/2008_07_01_archive.html (another Navy doc sent to Afghanistan but for 452 days)

http://danieljmt.blogspot.com/ (Navy anesthesiologist in Afghanistan, also went to Ft. Riley for the above training)
 
Thanks for the interesting Blogs! It is hard to imagine a NAVY anesthesiologist going through all that combat training. The training looks exciting!

Here are some blogs that you may find interesting. They're written by Navy docs in Afghanistan.


http://danieljmt.blogspot.com/ (Navy anesthesiologist in Afghanistan, also went to Ft. Riley for the above training)
 
It is hard to imagine a NAVY anesthesiologist going through all that combat training.

Haven't read the blog, but I'd like to think the Navy's ahead of the curve by NOT sending anesthesiologists off for combat training.

And FWIW, there's a branch of the US Armed Forces known as the "Marine Corps" that gets all of its physicians from the Navy. Plenty of Navy doctors get all the guns & ammo infantry time they want ... and then some. :)
 
Thanks for the interesting Blogs! It is hard to imagine a NAVY anesthesiologist going through all that combat training. The training looks exciting!

There is probably a very good reason why AF, Navy, and Army doctors are undergoing combat training at Ft. Riley. Perhaps the more doctors are able to defend themselves, the fewer armed escorts they will need when they're deployed somewhere in Afghanistan?

Perhaps there is some truth to this poster's claims. The body armor alone is over 40 pounds of gear.

http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=656831
 
There is probably a very good reason why AF, Navy, and Army doctors are undergoing combat training at Ft. Riley. Perhaps the more doctors are able to defend themselves, the fewer armed escorts they will need when they're deployed somewhere in Afghanistan?

Perhaps there is some truth to this poster's claims. The body armor alone is over 40 pounds of gear.

http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=656831

In my battalion doctors garnered an inordinate amount of security because we only had two and Marines view them as their lifeline. Regardless of how much combat training they receive this fact will not change. Even as a corpsman--having received the same small-arms and MOUT training as my Marines--I was never left unprotected by my Marines. I think this training is for the unfortunate situations when the **** hits the fan and you are forced to defend yourself.
 
In my battalion doctors garnered an inordinate amount of security because we only had two and Marines view them as their lifeline. Regardless of how much combat training they receive this fact will not change. Even as a corpsman--having received the same small-arms and MOUT training as my Marines--I was never left unprotected by my Marines. I think this training is for the unfortunate situations when the **** hits the fan and you are forced to defend yourself.

Yes, it's good to prepare for the worst. The training is infrequently used in the field according to these blogs. Even manning the gun turret is a very infrequent occurrence.


An excerpt from blog 452 Days:

It isn’t often that I am the guy up in the turret of the Humvee...especially if the weapon on top of it is loaded. Sure, I qualified and learned how to shoot these weapons when I was at Ft. Riley and honestly I wasn’t a half bad shot. However, since Ft. Riley I have spent little time up in the turret. I think the Army realizes that sticking a doctor up in the turret is probably not the wisest use of its assets.

Yesterday afternoon, however, I found myself in enemy territory, up in the turret, watching and waiting for the bad guys to come my way. Alright, I may be dramatizing this story some. I actually was sitting in a very secure compound (the Herat Police Headquarters) and had little to no chance of actually running into any “bad guys”. Honestly, the only reason I even was up there was to relieve the poor guy who had been baking in the sun for the previous few hours. I felt bad for him and figured even the doctor could spend a few minutes up in the hot seat (no pun intended).

Although my time in the turret was uneventful, it was interesting to sit there and just think. I thought about what a horrible thing it would be if someone actually broke through the gate in the distance and I was required to use this weapon in front of me. I reflected on other “gunners”, who on a routine basis, sit in this seat, the most dangerous and exposed in the whole vehicle, to defend themselves, their friends, and their country. I thought of the few who have started a mission sitting in this seat, but have never made it home. I reflected on how blessed I have been that this is as close to the “fight” as I have ever been.

It was a nice few minutes of reflection. And the best part of all was that after about thirty minutes, right when it was starting to get really hot, my relief showed up and I was able to crawl back down to my shaded and softly padded seat below.
 
On Christmas.

The insurgents were probably targeting the officers' living quarters the whole time.

It's unfortunate but it's war.
 
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search Rhonda Cornum as an author...
I believe her book is "she went to war"

it is about her life as a flight surgeon and prisoner during the first gulf war.
She was actually on the cover of newsweek the week before 9/11 or august sometime of 2001.

she is now a general in the army.
I know her well and she is very interesting and motivating person.
 
search Rhonda Cornum as an author...
I believe her book is "she went to war"

it is about her life as a flight surgeon and prisoner during the first gulf war.
She was actually on the cover of newsweek the week before 9/11 or august sometime of 2001.

she is now a general in the army.
I know her well and she is very interesting and motivating person.

She was essentially a GMO when she was held captive?
 
The insurgents were probably targeting the officers' living quarters the whole time.

It's unfortunate but it's war.

A group of terrorists, unaffiliated with any government, firing on medical personel in a medical facility, is not war. It's crime. Which is why, when we catch the insurgents, we treat them as criminals and not POWs.
 
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