Botox

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LADoc00

Gen X, the last great generation
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Curious if anyone has even rough numbers as to how much dermies are pulling down on botox injections? Say on a per face level, net income.

Second ? is where are people going to learn this? Is it taught in residency?

I do tons of aspirations and am debating wading into this.

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technically for cosmetic botox you can charge anything you want... the cost of botox 100 Units from the pharmacy is about 500$ cash (and the patient should pay for it) and then you charge them for the injections...

because of the risks involved it is best to do 3-5 workshops before venturing on your own.... i only do botox for cervical dystonia, chronic myofascial pain and migraines - sometimes insurance covers it, other times it is just cash.
 
Tenesma said:
technically for cosmetic botox you can charge anything you want... the cost of botox 100 Units from the pharmacy is about 500$ cash (and the patient should pay for it) and then you charge them for the injections...

because of the risks involved it is best to do 3-5 workshops before venturing on your own.... i only do botox for cervical dystonia, chronic myofascial pain and migraines - sometimes insurance covers it, other times it is just cash.

You have a link for botox workshops, who does them?? I am completely serious about this.
 
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LADoc00 said:
You have a link for botox workshops, who does them?? I am completely serious about this.

Try workshops for cosmetic surgeons, oculoplastic surgeons and dermatologists. Allergan might also be a source of referral as they are the manufacturer of Botox and they have a substantial marketing department.
Most of Allergan's products are made for the ophthalmic market, so you may find information from sponsors of large ophthalmology meetings
where presentations and courses are usually offered. I suggest contacting the American Academy of Ophthalmology for their 2006 Annual Meeting prospectus. It takes place in the late fall, this year in Las Vegas. Non-ophthalmologists are able to attend for a fee.

I have been using Botox in my practice for about 10 years now. If you are thinking of adding its use in your practice, a course is a good idea.
 
I've heard of non-derm/plastics docs (like internists and FP) doing botox on the side to help supplement their income. Other than taking the workshops, do you need certification or some kind of licensure?
 
Are there any side effects?
Yes

Side effects may include:

Droopy eyelids, which can last for a few weeks
Feeling like you have the flu
Headache and upset stomach
Risk of botulism (a life or death illness that makes it hard for a person to move the arms and legs or to breathe) is low with Botox™, if used the right way
REMEMBER- Botox™ is a drug, not a cosmetic.

What should I do if I want to try Botox™?
Ask about how Botox™ could help or hurt you
Make sure your doctor is trained in the use of Botox™
Make sure you get treatment in a doctor's office or clinic
Emergency equipment should be on hand in case of a problem
Do not use if you are pregnant or think you might be pregnant
Do not use if you are breast feeding
Tell your doctor if you are taking antibiotics
Tell your doctor if you have any problems with nerves or muscles
 
quidnunc said:
I've heard of non-derm/plastics docs (like internists and FP) doing botox on the side to help supplement their income. Other than taking the workshops, do you need certification or some kind of licensure?


i've seen f.p's do all of it...botox etc.

can be done by taking a CME.
 
marcus_aurelius said:
i've seen f.p's do all of it...botox etc.

can be done by taking a CME.

My malpractice insurer told me adding any cosmetic procedures to ANYONE's practice (including derm, optho, surgery etc) adds to your premium bigtime. And you have to list each procedure you would ever do as well. As it is right now, I pay very very little for coverage. Anyone have similar experiences? Is my insurer trying to put one over on me?
 
LADoc00 said:
My malpractice insurer told me adding any cosmetic procedures to ANYONE's practice (including derm, optho, surgery etc) adds to your premium bigtime. And you have to list each procedure you would ever do as well. As it is right now, I pay very very little for coverage. Anyone have similar experiences? Is my insurer trying to put one over on me?
Its common practice for malpractice insurance companies to ask specifically about procedures you will be doing in your office.They want to know about cosmetic procedures because claims experience for these is high.It depends on each carrier how they do it but some may surcharge for various types of procedures.I dont think they would lie to you.Why dont you ask them how this would impact your rates.They deal with this stuff everyday and should be able tell you.You dont want surprises down the line.
 
Tenesma said:
.... i only do botox for cervical dystonia, chronic myofascial pain and migraines - sometimes insurance covers it, other times it is just cash.


Botox for migraines is awesome!!!! It helped me get off some of my migraine meds. Unfortunately my insurance stopped covering it :confused: :eek:
Damn those insurance companies!
 
so for an internists, which courses/certification could u take to do some common comestic procedures like botox, treating acne beyond the retin-a/antibiotic/benzamycin products, etc?
 
LADoc00 said:
My malpractice insurer told me adding any cosmetic procedures to ANYONE's practice (including derm, optho, surgery etc) adds to your premium bigtime. And you have to list each procedure you would ever do as well. As it is right now, I pay very very little for coverage. Anyone have similar experiences? Is my insurer trying to put one over on me?

Not true for Botox. But if you start doing full facelifts as a dermatologist or ophthalmologist, and especially if you do a lot of them, then you should expect to pay premiums similar to general plastic surgeons who do the same.
 
Ophthalmologists can offer botox treatments as well?
 
LADoc00 said:
My malpractice insurer told me adding any cosmetic procedures to ANYONE's practice (including derm, optho, surgery etc) adds to your premium bigtime. And you have to list each procedure you would ever do as well. As it is right now, I pay very very little for coverage. Anyone have similar experiences? Is my insurer trying to put one over on me?


maybe it's because you're a pathologist....?!

how come you want to do cosmetic procedures when you're training is non-clinical?
 
fomites said:
maybe it's because you're a pathologist....?!

how come you want to do cosmetic procedures when you're training is non-clinical?

I can answer that question with no words.

$$$$$

It's the basic driving force behind most career moves :)
 
cdql said:
I can answer that question with no words.

$$$$$

It's the basic driving force behind most career moves :)


ok, yeah agreed, lots of moolah in cosmetics, especially botox. BUT, what I was getting at in a round about way was this: pathologists deal with tissue and dead people....not exactly the kind of person anyone wants treating actual living patients, even if it's simple botox injections. Pretty common sense. I don;t see how a pathologist can markey himself as a patient care type person....unless the pathologist is deceptive in advertising or omits the whole path thing altogether.
I just don't think pathologists should be doing clincial work or cosmetic work. Just like Dr.90210 should not be doing autopsies. However, I think it's perfectly fine for clinical doctors to branch out into clinical cosmetics.


ya know?
 
Many pathologists do lots of FNA's. That seems just as "clinical" as Botox.
 
trent05 said:
Many pathologists do lots of FNA's. That seems just as "clinical" as Botox.

I was thinking the same thing (and I think LADOC was too)
 
Dunce said:
I was thinking the same thing (and I think LADOC was too)


if you can do botox injections without screwing up, people don't care if you're BC/BE in plastics, derm, or pooping. if the dermatologist down the street is charging $100 a treatment and you're charging $50 for the same end result, guess who gets the business? rent a small doctors office in a medical building, put up a sign and a coupon in the paper and you're set for life- a "Botox specialist"
 
To all people who are considering opening their own botox shop, the key phrase in that post is WITHOUT SCREWING UP!!!

When people walk out of your office unable to use their muscles for the purposes of breathing, that's a no-no!
 
cdql said:
To all people who are considering opening their own botox shop, the key phrase in that post is WITHOUT SCREWING UP!!!

When people walk out of your office unable to use their muscles for the purposes of breathing, that's a no-no!


no joke. :) but if you're dumb enough to inject botox into a vein, you got some work to do. :)
 
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