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Can a non-DO learn OMT?

Discussion in 'Medical Students - DO' started by carc2023, Mar 28, 2001.

  1. carc2023

    carc2023 Junior Member
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    I was curious to know if it was possible for a non-DO to learn OMT. If anyone who knows the answer to this could please post a response it would be greatly appreciated.
     
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  3. M00se

    M00se Member
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    At my school there are a couple of docs who regularly attend our OMM class. One of our table trainers is excellent and he's an MD.

    ------------------
    Jim
     
  4. Liquid_Tension

    Liquid_Tension Senior Member
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    Of course a non-DO can learn OMT! I really think that anyone can learn and apply the principles of OMT to their patients. The key is practice and practice. If you want to be good at anything, you have to work at it, and OMT is no different. It takes a lot of practice to get good at it.
    -your most manipulating Liquid
     
  5. drusso

    Physician Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

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    Absolutely! It might be expensive though. Check with the American Academy of Osteopathy for continuing medical education classes.
     
  6. turtleboard

    turtleboard SDN Advisor
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    MSUCOM has a course for MDs and dds/dmds. [​IMG]

    I'm hoping to get out there to take it some day after I gradaute.




    ------------------
    Tim Wu.
     
  7. carc2023

    carc2023 Junior Member
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    Thanks for the replies. I will look at some of those courses for continuing medical education courses.
     
  8. ewagner

    ewagner Senior Member
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    What's funny is that the best practitioners of myofascial release that i have seen have been PT's.
    Muscle Energy is called PNF in PT, and is actually far better researched as PNF.
    Anyone can learn to "rack and crack"...ask a chiropractor.
    Some of the best at understanding biomechanics have been Exercise Physiologists and some academic ortho PT's that I have met.

    I think the real challenge is to understand that a medical diagnosis has a rehab component to it...I am not talking about "rib raising" or "counter nutating my occiput" but rather, pt's need to move to be healthy. They can't lay in a hospital bed, with the curtains shut, and watch Ricky Lake on the TV. Healing takes effort. That is a very "osteopathic" philosophy shared by MANY professions!
     
  9. ewagner

    ewagner Senior Member
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    Hope2001, with regards to PT's and OMT...they are easily qualified to manipulate, to do soft tissue (Rolfing etc), PNF/Muscle energy, etc...all the physical aspects of rehab. All of those techniques are learned in school, not just CME (actually more hours than ANY DO school).
    The medical aspect is what makes osteopathic physicians unique and how it intertwines with physical medicine.
     

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