Can pharmacist specialize?

Discussion in 'Pre-Pharmacy' started by oae, Nov 19, 2009.

  1. oae

    oae New Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2006
    Messages:
    407
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Dental
    Hey everyone,

    I tried to search information about specializing as a pharmacist, but failed to find anything solid.

    Im new to considering pharmacy as a career and need answers?

    I was wondering if there are any specialities in pharmacy (sort of like how Dentists can specialize to become Orthodontists/Endodontists)?

    If so, can you please describe them, and also the benefits associated with specializing, including the avergae $$ salaries? How competitive is it? How much longer does it take after pharm school?

    Thanks alot
     
  2. Passion4Sci

    Moderator Emeritus 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2009
    Messages:
    7,504
    Likes Received:
    12
    Status:
    Pharmacy Student
    There are some specialties, including BCPS, or Board Certified Pharmacotherapy Specialist (http://www.bpsweb.org/specialties/pharmacotherapy.cfm), but nothing steadfast like "Orthodontist." Pharmacy as a practice in its current iteration is very new especially when compared to dentistry!

    From my experience in a hospital, specialists don't make a whole lot more money starting off than do standard-issue RPhs (Staff, clinical). All right around ~$60/hr.

    The BCPS doesn't require residency or anything, but I personally believe a PGY residency will really make you a stronger applicant for positions in the future when Pharm.Ds are a dime-a-dozen. You'll be looking at an extra year (or two, for some schools) after your didactics end. Some schools, like Touro-CA, have 2 years didactic and then 2 years clinical practice.

    In other words, there are no rules with pharmacy since it's in its infancy. Climb aboard the crazy train.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  3. rycetrix

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2008
    Messages:
    395
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Yes, pharmacists can specialize and some specialties are needed. Specializing often requires a PGY-2 residency (so basically 2 years after pharm school to specialize). You can specialize in Cardiology, Infectious Disease, Hematology/Oncology, Surgery, Transplant, Pediatric, Geriatric, etc. The list is endless. It all depends on what you want to. Most people are undecided until they actually get into pharmacy school and are exposed to the various options. You'll learn them soon enough, but it wouldn't hurt to read up on different specialties now. As far as salaries, I am not sure how it compares. Often, hospital pharmacy tends to get paid less than retail, but I am sure there are some cases where hospital does get paid more. But in any case, we're not doing this for the $$ right? :rolleyes:
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  4. Farmercyst

    Farmercyst From the shadows
    Pharmacist Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2006
    Messages:
    7,860
    Likes Received:
    6
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    In all your searching, did you come across the FAQs. There used to be quite a bit of info on areas/niches in pharmacy. pharmacist.com also has a tool called the "pathway program" . If you go to pharmacist.com, click on careers (upper-left), the click on "pathway program" It should help.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  5. OP
    OP
    oae

    oae New Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2006
    Messages:
    407
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Dental
    thanks everyone for responding.

    Its interesting to hear that pharmacy is in its "infancy". I always thought pharmacists have been around forever or atleast a long time.


    Also, it seems like specializing simply enhances a pharmacist's resume and ensure better job security over "Regular pharmacists". There seems to be no significant salary increase associated with specializing (not that $$ matters, but just to know for my informational purposes)

    I guess a final question would be: How successful can a pharmacist be with opening a private pharmacy (assuming a strong business plan, a good location, and innovative approach (ie. a Holistic component)).
     
  6. tcid

    tcid Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    You are right that pharmacy has been around a long time, but it's more like the practice of pharmacy is evolving to more than just dispensing drugs. It's the clinical aspect of pharmacy that's in its infancy.

    Independent pharmacies can be very successful if you have a good business plan, and I must emphasize IF. Times are getting very tough for independents, especially with the $4 generic programs that chain stores are running to draw people in. Independents are left with no choice but to match those prices at a loss, and they usually don't have a larger store with lots of other products and services to make up those losses. You would need to offer some services that are very unique or innovative to draw people in.
     
  7. pharmRxn

    Joined:
    May 18, 2009
    Messages:
    174
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Pre-Pharmacy
    pharmacists specialize to get a better life style and the salary is actually lower for specialists. do it only if you enjoy it.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  8. IrishRxMan

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    669
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Pharmacy Student
    By specializing you will also enable yourself to be a professor at a school of pharmacy if that is what you think you may want to do. Specializing may not pay much better, but it gets you into a different area of pharmacy besides dispensing. Most pharmacists will have a couple of jobs for the first few years if they go the clinical route so they can pay off loans and start saving for retirement. There is a long list of specialties out there that is growing for you to choose from.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  9. njac

    njac Senior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2005
    Messages:
    11,647
    Likes Received:
    6,037
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    clinical pharmacy is in its infancy?
     
  10. tcid

    tcid Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2006
    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    I guess what I meant was that it's in its infancy in community pharmacies. I should have known better since I'm planning to be working in a hospital!
     
  11. hornblower

    Removed

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Pre-Pharmacy
    Dude, even chiros can specialize.

    A bone cruncher near me titles himself as "Neuro-Cervical Rehabilitation Specialist".
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  12. socalpharm86

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2009
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    4
    At least he's humble enough not to call himself a "Neuro-Cervical Rebilitation Physician"!
     
  13. smartpharmacist

    Removed

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2009
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    u can specialize in the quality control by prepraring a pharmacy master in analytical chemistry or idusTrial pharmacy to be able to work in drug factories
     
  14. Farcus

    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    826
    Likes Received:
    28
    Status:
    Pharmacist
    Is on the ball of things

    Yes, pharmacist can specialize, people doesn't realize it because like the quoted, clinical pharmacy is in the infancy. There are at least 5 recognized board certified specialty right now. As the profession grows, more board certified specialty will be recognized.
     

Share This Page